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Thread: Medically induced stress test?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Medically induced stress test?

    Are they safe? Has anyone had one?

    I'm having surgery to remove stones & they gave me a EKG pretest to ck me out. They sent the report to my cardiologist. He said I had to have a medically induced stress test 1st before he would clear me for surgery. I've never had such & have had this same surgery 4 times, plus another to remove polyps.

    It sounds like it could be dangerous. Stressing my heart w/chemicals. My pulse rate is 40 - 55 highest ever for yrs. You do imaging with stress. Then eat a big meal & imaging again. Strange test!

    Could it cause ad?

    Any info appreciated.

  2. #2
    Hi Mona,
    When I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, the cardiologist needed to know if there was heart damage and if so, what was the extent of the damage. Since I could not take an exercising stress test, he prescribed a Cardiac Nuclear Persantine Exercise Stress Test. Below is the information the doctor gave me to read before the test.

    WHAT IS A CARDIAC NUCLEAR PERSANTINE EXERCISE STRESS TEST?
    This test uses a radioactive material (isotope) that is injected into the bloodstream and allows the Nuclear Medicine technologist to take pictures of your heart. For patients who are unable to exercise, the nuclear imaging material may be combined with a medication called Persantine. The test will produce images/pictures that will help your doctor to determine if there is an area of your heart that is not receiving enough blood. The nuclear imaging material is not a "dye." It is widely used and has been shown to be safe.

    HOW DOES THE PERSANTINE WORK ON THE HEART?
    The Persantine is injected into an intravenous (IV) line and produces a slight widening of the arteries. Arteries that are healthy will respond more to the Persantine than arteries that are diseased. The scan done following the infusion will show the areas of the heart that are supplied by healthy arteries and those with blockages or areas of possible disease.

    WHAT WILL THE PICTURES SHOW?
    After the injection, the nuclear imaging material travels through the bloodstream to the heart. The nuclear imaging material gives off a small amount of radiation that can be seen with a special camera. The areas of the heart that are diseased (because of blocked or narrowed arteries) will not pick up as much nuclear material as those with healthy arteries. The computer will process the images to show areas of decreased blood flow, called "defects." The Cardiologist will analyze these pictures.

    HOW IS IT DONE?
    The test is done in two parts, resting and stress. The first part is done after an IV is started in your arm and the nuclear imaging material is injected into your vein. This will be allowed to circulate for 30 minutes while you rest comfortably on a bed or in a chair.

    Following this circulation time, the first scan will be done. For both scans, you will be asked to lie flat with your left arm above your head. This scan takes about 15 minutes. After completing this scan, the second part of the test will begin.
    The second part of the test involves resting on a bed or chair while the Persantine is injected through your IV. This will be followed by a second injection of nuclear imaging material. After the Persantine infusion, you will be asked to perform moderate exercise for approximately 4 minutes. Once again, this imaging material will circulate for 30 minutes while you rest and then the final scan will be done under the same camera. You will be allowed to eat or drink during this wait. This scan time is about 15 minutes.

    It is important that you lie still for each scan while the camera rotates around your chest. The two scans will help to determine if any defects or blockages are temporary, or if they are permanent as a result of earlier heart damage.

    HOW DO I PREPARE?
    1. Bring all of your signed doctors' orders and referrals with you.
    2. Bring a list of your medications with you.
    3. Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before.
    **NO caffeine for 12 hours before your test and NO tobacco the day of the test.
    4. Notify your doctor if you have asthma or any chronic lung disease.
    5. Should I take my medicine on the day of the test?
    CONSULT THE DOCTOR who ordered the test about your medications. Medications containing THEOPHYLLINE are very important to ask about. Get specific instructions about medications for blood pressure and diabetes. For patients taking oral Persantine (dipyridamole), this must be stopped 48 hours prior to the test and only after consulting with the doctor who ordered the test.
    6. Dress in comfortable clothing for the test.

    HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE?
    Allow 3-1/2 to 4 hours for the test

    HOW WILL I GET THE RESULTS?
    Results are generally available in about 48-72 hours. Contact the doctor who ordered the test to obtain the results.

    All the best,
    GJ

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Thank you! Was it scary? Hurt your heart?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Mona~on~wheels View Post
    Thank you! Was it scary? Hurt your heart?
    No and No.

    All the best,
    GJ

  5. #5
    mona, i had one before colonoscopy 5 or 6 yrs ago. EKGs don't work for me. the one thing i hated about stress test is the drug given to accel heartrate made me feel very panicky but they were right there w/me whole time. to my knowledge, other than it being pretty uncomfortable, no damage is incurred. having a sci, we can't do treadmill, so drugs simulate stress on heart. don't worry. but be prepared for panicky feeling.

    i respectfully disagree w/GJ. it was scary as my heart was racing and it was not pleasant. that feeling only lasted maybe 15 or 20 minutes so just expect it and don't let it worry you. also, i dunno where GJ's description is pasted from, but it calls for moderate exercise. this, obviously, didn't apply to me or to most sci, i would think. i was lying down for the entire test.

    btw, my results were given to me right after by the dr.
    Last edited by cass; 06-19-2012 at 11:50 PM.

  6. #6
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    just had one. It is not a lot of fun, they don't use as much on the stress test as they do on the tilt table. for me, they wanted to induce the passing out thing and see if that was it. It was exactly the same feeling.

    the tech doing the test pays very close attention to your vital signs. Im not going to lie, I was a yucky test to have. it is no fun to pass out, but I think with the heart monitor,and blood pressure monitor, and the other screen they look onto with vital signs, that the test is pretty safe, and important to take.

    It did not hurt my heart, but was like passing out from heat.

  7. #7
    i came no where near passing out, mona. never felt like that. just, racing heart. you'll be fine. the doc, tech and nurse were with me whole time. not sure what jody's analogy to tilt table means as, for me, it was nothing like tilt table experience in early rehab, which used no drugs. the stress test is not aimed at a passing out mark at all.
    Last edited by cass; 06-19-2012 at 11:59 PM.

  8. #8
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    I had a test like the one described above. I felt something like car sick too. very strong during the test, and mild for a day. shaky knee'd for a few hours.

    It is nice to know some folks don't feel that. I commented during the test watching people pass out all day must be a crappy job, and he said not everyone passes out, but that is sorta the point of the test. Maybe they gave me more of the stuff because I had passed out at home quite a few times.

  9. #9
    chemically induced stress test is not an unusual test and is standard for patients who cannot walk due to medical condition.

    keep us posted on the outcome of the test and your upcoming surgery

    pbr

  10. #10
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    Thank you all! I don't like to pass out or feel like I'm going to! They didn't mention that. So hopefully Jody I won't have that test. So sorry you had to go thru it.
    Thanks Cass I think that's what I'm worried about. Panic Attack. Also that my heart won't be able to take it. My pulse hasn't been over 50 in years.
    pbr does anyone have a heart attack from this test?

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