Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: What about chronic incomplete spinal cord injuries?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Good idea. We have been hoping to use that phase 2 approach to answer the question of whether the treatment would be safe in older patients (65-80 years old), in children (8-17 years old), and high quads (C1-C4). Wise.
    That would be fantastic to open the criteria. Thank you for your continued communication and dedication to us and our families.

    I'd love to see children included.

  2. #22
    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Coastal Virginia
    Posts
    1,671
    Thank you for your time and commitment Dr. Young. Reading this thread boosts even the hopes of an old timer like myself ( 34+ post SCI) for the possibilities of an improved quality of life in whatever form that might be.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    So. California
    Posts
    1,063
    Dr. Young, thank you for all that you do for us! Because of you, I am more hopeful now than I have ever been and for that I am forever grateful!!

  4. #24
    Dr Wise Young I've been reading all this and I am excited
    Thank you
    Sincerely ;
    GL

  5. #25
    Senior Member mj23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    490
    Dr. Wise Young, I don't know to much about stem cellls, etc. but do you think this would improve drop foot in an incomplete walking quad?
    C-5, 6 SCI. Took about 6 months to walk. Walking full time. Without any assistance since Nov. 2003 and will make a full recovery

  6. #26
    “For the vision is yet for an appointed time...though it tarry, wait for it...”(Habakkuk 2:3, KJV)

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by BSgimp View Post
    Hello Dr.

    I have been absorbing all the information like a sponge and Its been a great read. I learned much about the therapy and everything that goes with it. Anyway, this thread is a bit worrisome. I hope it wont come as a selfish but maybe few on our forum share the same concern.

    My situation is a bit uncommon and bizarre and many have been poking with a stick at me during my stay at hospital. I am a C4/C5 Brown sequard syndrome and I recovered a lot of function on 1 side of my body. Not so lucky on the other side. As a consequence I am fully functional and I have bowel/bladder. I can walk but with one crutch and only small distances. I wonder how that might effect the possibility of taking part in a therapy such as the one in trials. From what I could learn there are still many questions regarding this issue but I would appreciate some of your thoughts. I know its impossible to know for sure but what would be your impression so far. Could it be that the surgery with such highly functional individual would not be advised ? What can I hope for, given that I have a lot of connections back already? Logically thinking I assume that if this therapy is proved to be successful in complete injuries it will be even more so in highly functional incompletes.

    I feel bad even asking as I know I am the lucky one here and there are people in much more difficult situations but I would still greatly benefit from possible "cure" since half of my body is paralyzed to some degree.

    Anyway, thank you for restoring hope in us. I cannot express my gratitude.

    Thank you in advance. Regards, Bart.
    Bart,

    Don't feel bad about asking. You are asking on behalf of many people who also have Brown-Secquard Syndrome. As you have already described, many people with Brown-Secquard syndrome recover walking, as well as bowel-and-bladder function. This, however, doesn't mean that you will not benefit from the therapies that are being developed. The more incomplete people are, the more function they will have.

    I just met with a young man who is a Brown-Secquard and he can't walk more than 10 minutes without having to sit down. He has to use some transportation device when he is attending classes at UC Irvine. I asked him why he doesn't use a Segway. He says that the university will not allow him to do so and forces him to use a golf-cart. He asked essentially the same question as you did, whether any of the therapies would be applicable to people like him.

    Until we try, we of course will not know. This kind of study also has to be done in humans, sooner or later. As long as we are reasonably sure that the therapy is safe and is unlikely to cause any loss of function, if umbilical cord blood and lithium improves function in people with "complete" spinal cord injuries, I think that it will be worthwhile trying the treatment in chronic "incomplete" patients to see if it will improve function. That is just my opinion and I have to convince my colleagues to go ahead to do this in trials.

    Wise.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    c4/c5 Incomplete - NYC
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Bart,

    Don't feel bad about asking. You are asking on behalf of many people who also have Brown-Secquard Syndrome. As you have already described, many people with Brown-Secquard syndrome recover walking, as well as bowel-and-bladder function. This, however, doesn't mean that you will not benefit from the therapies that are being developed. The more incomplete people are, the more function they will have.

    I just met with a young man who is a Brown-Secquard and he can't walk more than 10 minutes without having to sit down. He has to use some transportation device when he is attending classes at UC Irvine. I asked him why he doesn't use a Segway. He says that the university will not allow him to do so and forces him to use a golf-cart. He asked essentially the same question as you did, whether any of the therapies would be applicable to people like him.

    Until we try, we of course will not know. This kind of study also has to be done in humans, sooner or later. As long as we are reasonably sure that the therapy is safe and is unlikely to cause any loss of function, if umbilical cord blood and lithium improves function in people with "complete" spinal cord injuries, I think that it will be worthwhile trying the treatment in chronic "incomplete" patients to see if it will improve function. That is just my opinion and I have to convince my colleagues to go ahead to do this in trials.

    Wise.
    Thank you Dr.

    Its interesting cause that is exactly my situation. I also can only walk for around 10 minutes.. more or less and then the fatigue in my legs wont allow me to walk further .. the spasms are kicking in but after taking some rest I can continue. I was fortunate that my University provide us with disability buss that takes me where I need to go. I just need to call them up =]
    Anyway, thank you for your response. I hope you can convince your team. I am sure they understand SCI is not only a complete injury but a long array of all kinds of incomplete types. We are all different but we all share the same hopes and dreams.

    Have a good weekend. Regards,Bart.
    Last edited by BSgimp; 06-16-2012 at 02:02 PM.

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Numurkah, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    jody, from your lips to God's ear. We have been working on these trials since 2007, if one excludes the observational trial which was to show that ChinaSCINet can do the trials. I had originally hoped to get the phase 3 trials going in 2012 but not all the phase 2 data has been collected yet. So, the phase 3 was pushed to 2013. It has been a long haul and hardest part is yet to come. Wise.
    Sorry Dr Wise but I would have thought that the trials themslves would be the hardest part? Especially the costs involved.

    So whats happens or is required to happen after trial phase 3, if you don't mind explaining or at least point to a document for me to read thats a super dumb layman like myself can understand.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by CAS View Post
    Sorry Dr Wise but I would have thought that the trials themslves would be the hardest part? Especially the costs involved.

    So whats happens or is required to happen after trial phase 3, if you don't mind explaining or at least point to a document for me to read thats a super dumb layman like myself can understand.
    CAS,

    I was referring to the phase 3 trials being the hardest part. We will be starting them in 2013.

    After phase 3 trials, the next step is to obtain regulatory approval. The time it takes depends on the results. If the results are truly spectacular and it is a multinational and multicenter, once one regulatory agency approves than there is a domino effect. If one or more countries declines to approval, then it may take a year or more to gather all the evidence to answer questions and hope that they will approve.

    One regulatory approval occurs, one has to get insurance company approval. In many countries, the decision is made by the government. In the United States, that decision is only partly up to the government. Even if Medicare approves of the therapy, private insurance companies may take a while to adopt the therapy. If the therapy is inexpensive compared to the costs that it will save, that approval will not be difficult.

    Finally, in the United States (and many countries are adopting a similar approach), phase 4 trials are required. These are long-term safety trials that occur after regulatory approval.

    Wise.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-24-2003, 01:24 PM
  2. Chronic Pain with Spinal Cord Injuries
    By paintrials in forum Pain
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-22-2003, 11:31 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-19-2002, 05:30 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-02-2002, 07:46 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-04-2001, 12:00 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •