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Thread: What about chronic incomplete spinal cord injuries?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by moneymaker View Post
    I gotta question can these muse cells grown into large populations? Say if we needed 10 million cells for a transplant?
    Hey, Romel. I am sending students to Mari Dezawa's laboratory in Japan to learn how to grow these cells. Scaling of cell culturing from laboratory procedures designed to produce hundreds of thousands of cells to millions of cells take time and work. I understand that it can be done. We are currently injecting a maximum of 6.4 million umbilical cord mononuclear cells into the spinal cord. By the way, we are using that many cells because only about 5% of the cells are so-called stem cells. Since Muse cells are all stem cells, we may not need to inject that many. Much depends on animal studies and how difficult the expansion procedure is. We shall see.

    Wise.

  2. #12
    By the way, I have to come to Norway soon to discuss these issues with the investigators in Norway. I just got back from China last week and will be heading back this coming week. It will be my third trip in six weeks. Sigh.

    Wise.

    Thank you and God bless you, Wise.

  3. #13
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    i know we are in different fields of research, but i want to extend my congratulations to you dr wise!!! this is indeed very exciting!!! keep posting the updates. i've thought about it, but as an incomplete, some function like just being able to stand and reach things would be super nice despite my 4'9" frame lol but the pain is definitely worrisome as in pt it hurts and i get AD if my legs are being moved in some sort of locomotion.

    do you think the use of these cells would help minimize any pain experienced?
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    less than two years? wow.
    jody, from your lips to God's ear. We have been working on these trials since 2007, if one excludes the observational trial which was to show that ChinaSCINet can do the trials. I had originally hoped to get the phase 3 trials going in 2012 but not all the phase 2 data has been collected yet. So, the phase 3 was pushed to 2013. It has been a long haul and hardest part is yet to come. Wise.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by crypticgimp View Post
    i know we are in different fields of research, but i want to extend my congratulations to you dr wise!!! this is indeed very exciting!!! keep posting the updates. i've thought about it, but as an incomplete, some function like just being able to stand and reach things would be super nice despite my 4'9" frame lol but the pain is definitely worrisome as in pt it hurts and i get AD if my legs are being moved in some sort of locomotion.

    do you think the use of these cells would help minimize any pain experienced?
    Cryptic,

    We found (to our surprise) that lithium appears to reduce neuropathic pain (but not actual pain). One of the requirements of the trial is that people must be able to stand at least an hour a day (in a standing frame). If you get AD when weight-bearing or your legs are moved, you should get some x-rays of your hips. I worry that you may have a dislocation or other orthopedic problem that causes you pain when standing and moving your legs.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 06-14-2012 at 10:22 AM.

  6. #16
    Rather than expanding the phase 3 trial, perhaps an additional phase 1/2 trial could be run concurrently with a small cohort of 10-20 patients to confirm that the risk of neurological loss is negligible. This may assuage any apprehension that surgeons may have.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by KofQ View Post
    Rather than expanding the phase 3 trial, perhaps an additional phase 1/2 trial could be run concurrently with a small cohort of 10-20 patients to confirm that the risk of neurological loss is negligible. This may assuage any apprehension that surgeons may have.
    Good idea. We have been hoping to use that phase 2 approach to answer the question of whether the treatment would be safe in older patients (65-80 years old), in children (8-17 years old), and high quads (C1-C4). Wise.

  8. #18
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    Hello Dr.

    I have been absorbing all the information like a sponge and Its been a great read. I learned much about the therapy and everything that goes with it. Anyway, this thread is a bit worrisome. I hope it wont come as a selfish but maybe few on our forum share the same concern.

    My situation is a bit uncommon and bizarre and many have been poking with a stick at me during my stay at hospital. I am a C4/C5 Brown sequard syndrome and I recovered a lot of function on 1 side of my body. Not so lucky on the other side. As a consequence I am fully functional and I have bowel/bladder. I can walk but with one crutch and only small distances. I wonder how that might effect the possibility of taking part in a therapy such as the one in trials. From what I could learn there are still many questions regarding this issue but I would appreciate some of your thoughts. I know its impossible to know for sure but what would be your impression so far. Could it be that the surgery with such highly functional individual would not be advised ? What can I hope for, given that I have a lot of connections back already? Logically thinking I assume that if this therapy is proved to be successful in complete injuries it will be even more so in highly functional incompletes.

    I feel bad even asking as I know I am the lucky one here and there are people in much more difficult situations but I would still greatly benefit from possible "cure" since half of my body is paralyzed to some degree.

    Anyway, thank you for restoring hope in us. I cannot express my gratitude.

    Thank you in advance. Regards, Bart.
    Last edited by BSgimp; 06-14-2012 at 02:40 PM.

  9. #19
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    From my mouth to Gods ear. yes God has heard from me on this matter.

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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Cryptic,

    We found (to our surprise) that lithium appears to reduce neuropathic pain (but not actual pain). One of the requirements of the trial is that people must be able to stand at least an hour a day (in a standing frame). If you get AD when weight-bearing or your legs are moved, you should get some x-rays of your hips. I worry that you may have a dislocation or other orthopedic problem that causes you pain when standing and moving your legs.

    Wise.
    yes, my hips are out of their sockets for the majority of the time. the right hip especially. been that way since was a child. but no surgery to correct as the cons outweighed the benefits especially in terms of flexibility. ty for your response! it was in line with what i was thinking.
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
    http://www.elportavoz.com/

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