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Thread: FOS - Fructooligosaccharides SAFE?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    FOS - Fructooligosaccharides SAFE?

    I would like your opinion. Do you think it's safe to take FOS which helps all bacteria GOOD or BAD grow in your intestines?

    FOS - Fructooligosaccharides
    Making a Case Against FOS and Inulin

    Have you heard about Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) or Inulin yet? If not,
    you will. These are the latest and greatest refined chemicals that
    probiotic and yoghurt manufacturers are adding to their products for "your
    health". It seems that only a few probiotic manufacturers are against
    using them, with Natren leading the charge. But we like to ask, why is
    this? Why would Natren be against using FOS in yoghurt and probiotic
    supplements? What kind of financial gain is involved in not using the
    latest and greatest chemicals in your products? None that we could think
    of. So we decided to investigate this matter further.

    1. What is FOS and Inulin?
    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin are types of
    fructo-polysaccharides, comprised of -(glucose-fructose)- subunits. The
    only difference between FOS and inulin is polymer chain length. Inulin/FOS
    also goes by the name of Neosugar, Alant Starch, Atlanta Starch, Alantin,
    Dahlin, Helenin, and
    Diabetic Sugar. Inulin tastes sweet, cannot be
    digested by humans, and is soluble (unlike cellulose).


    continued..............

    http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.i...accharides.htm

  2. #2
    It's probably safe, just a waste of money if you eat a good diet with lots of fruit, vegetables and beans.

    I wouldn't take it after antibiotic therapy though- rely on the probiotics and a good diet to recolonize your gastrointestinal tract with the 'good' bacteria.
    http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supple...IGOSACCHARIDES

  3. #3
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inulin

    they can cause just a lot of gas in large quantities but for probiotics blends in pill form, they arent a problem
    "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
    http://www.elportavoz.com/

  4. #4
    Can't say I've heard of this, but I also am not privy to your medical records and know your history.
    I hope it is not an expensive supplement to purchase. Make sure and let your provider know what supplements you are taking.
    Here is the website and a little blurb on FOS:



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructooligosaccharide



    FOS has been a popular dietary supplement in Japan for many years, even before 1990, when the Japanese government installed a "Functionalized Food Study Committee" of 22 experts to start to regulate "special nutrition foods or functional foods" that contain the categories of fortified foods (e.g., vitamin-fortified wheat flour),[4] and is now becoming increasingly popular in Western cultures for its prebiotic effects. FOS serves as a substrate for microflora in the large intestine, increasing the overall gastrointestinal tract (GI Tract) health. It has also been touted as a supplement for preventing yeast infections.
    Several studies have found that FOS and inulin promote calcium absorption in both the animal and the human gut.[5][6] The intestinal microflora in the lower gut can ferment FOS, which results in a reduced pH. Calcium is more soluble in acid, and, therefore, more of it comes out of food and is available to move from the gut into the bloodstream.
    FOS can be considered a small dietary fibre with (like all types of fibre) low caloric value. The fermentation of FOS results in the production of gases and acids. The latter provide some energy to the body.


    Side effects


    All inulin-type prebiotics, including FOS, are generally thought to stimulate the growth of Bifidobacteria species. Bifidobacteria are considered "friendly" bacteria. This effect has not been uniformly found in all studies, both for Bifidobacteria and for other gut organisms.[7][unreliable source?] FOS are also fermented by numerous bacterial species in the intestine, including Klebsiella, E. coli[8] and many Clostridium species, which are considered less-friendly bacteria in the gut. These species are responsible mainly for the gas formation (hydrogen and carbon dioxide), which results after ingestion of FOS. Most people can eat 5-10 grams of FOS without gaseous discomfort, whereas others have problems with 1 gram. The estimated optimal dose for adults is around 5-10 gram/day.[9][citation needed]


    pbr

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mona~on~wheels's Avatar
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    This effect has not been uniformly found in all studies, both for Bifidobacteria and for other gut organisms.[7][unreliable source?] FOS are also fermented by numerous bacterial species in the intestine, including Klebsiella, E. coli[8] and many Clostridium species, which are considered less-friendly bacteria in the gut.These species are responsible mainly for the gas formation (hydrogen and carbon dioxide), which results after ingestion of FOS. Most people can eat 5-10 grams of FOS without gaseous discomfort, whereas others have problems with 1 gram. The estimated optimal dose for adults is around 5-10 gram/day.[9][citation needed]
    Thanks pbr!

    That's what scares me!
    I'm not worried about gas. I have a strong system. But I don't want to add fuel to the fire to help grow bad bacteria such as Klebsiella, E. coli[8] and many Clostridium species, which are considered less-friendly bacteria in the gut.

    Should I be concerned about that?

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