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Thread: Detethering Spinal Cord

  1. #1

    Detethering Spinal Cord

    Is detethering (untethering, the same?) a promising therapy for removing scar tissue, cyst and neurogenic pain?
    Are there other procedures for removing scar tissue?
    Could adhesion release of cauda equina bring about the risk of neurologic function deterioration?
    Last edited by Ah Lun; 06-05-2012 at 02:33 AM.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Lun View Post
    Is detethering (untethering, the same?) a promising therapy for removing scar tissue, cyst and neurogenic pain?
    Are there other procedures for removing scar tissue?
    Could adhesion release of cauda equina bring about the risk of neurologic function deterioration?
    If the spinal cord is tethered, untethering may restore some function, collapse syringomyelic cysts, and reduce neuropathic pain. If you have progressive loss of function, it may stop the progression but may not restore function. Much of course depends on the injury. Removal of adhesions of the cauda equina does carry a risk of function loss.

    For the above reasons, most neurosurgeons don't operate to untether the spinal cord or cauda equina unless there is evidence of progressive neurological loss. MRI's are not reliable indicators of the extent of adhesions or tethering. Much of the time, the extent of adhesions can only be determined upon surgical exposure.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    If the spinal cord is tethered, untethering may restore some function, collapse syringomyelic cysts, and reduce neuropathic pain. If you have progressive loss of function, it may stop the progression but may not restore function. Much of course depends on the injury. Removal of adhesions of the cauda equina does carry a risk of function loss.

    For the above reasons, most neurosurgeons don't operate to untether the spinal cord or cauda equina unless there is evidence of progressive neurological loss. MRI's are not reliable indicators of the extent of adhesions or tethering. Much of the time, the extent of adhesions can only be determined upon surgical exposure.

    Wise.
    I had untethering and the remomoval of an arachnoid cyst because they believed that to be the basis of the neuro pain, spasticity, and clonus. It worked for a few mobths and then it all came back inlcuding the tethering (and I also lost feeling that I had regained). Now they're hesitant to do it again.
    But thanks for the tip about the MRI. The doc says it's not so big, but now I realize that the only way to see that is by opening it up. Will a myelogram tell the story?
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  4. #4
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    I'm losing sensation and movement, my spine curves seem worse, pains always get worse, but the surgeon doesn't see any ascending changes in MRIs, just change between C-4 and C-6 where (he said) ongoing scar formation between two stable syrinxes has squashed what was left of spinal cord in that area. He doesn't want to operate.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  5. #5
    Based on the above stories, the benefits brought after detethering could be temporary, couldn't they?
    Last edited by Kheng; 06-07-2012 at 07:55 AM.

  6. #6
    Here is a very interesting article with the experiences of a few people with cysts, tethering, and even syringomyelia.

    http://www.newmobility.com/articleView.cfm?id=11376
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  7. #7
    Since untethering possesses some unwanted risks, is the best way to solve tethering/adhesion is to dissolve the scar tissue?

  8. #8
    Shockwave is used in physiotherapy. Can it be used for removing glial scar and solving tethering in spinal cord?

  9. #9
    Ah Lun, I am not sure that there is any drug that "dissolves" adhesions. Surgery is actually quite safe. The problem is that adhesions can recur. Likewise, I would be nervous about "shock wave" treatments of the spinal cord.

    SCAB, good article. I agree with most of what is said in it.

    Alan, I have long been at a loss to explain what is going on with your spinal cord. Your neurosurgeon's explanation seems to be as good as any.

    Kheng, it is true that the adhesions and tethering can recur. However, in 80% of the time, they do not recur.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Dr Young,

    Shockwave is used in physiotherapy for removing scar tissue and adhesion of certain parts of body. I wonder whether anybody has ever used and tested it for resolving sc's tethering. But i somewhat read that it cannot be used when there is metallic implant and that it produces heat. Am i mistaken? I wonder whether, if it is used on sc, it will bring harm to sc. But it all depends on scientist's work.

    I read from somewhere that during untethering, an expansion graft is placed to enhance the dural space and decrease the risk of re-scarring. What is expansion graft? Made from what? Is it a good way to avoid re-scarring? What is dural space?

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