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Thread: Life Expectancy after Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Scaper1 View Post
    My point was that it didn't matter that they were awesome, happy, smiling kids, despite everything. They never had a chance against their SCI.
    I apologize for missing that.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leo View Post
    sounds quite selfish to me

    even if i don't see the cure

    i don't want my kids or grandkids to experience sci

    and if we with sci don't make it happen no one will
    your spot on - unless you enjoy being a bum or a drain on others including the system then fine. But I for one like the prospect of being able to have the real choose of a career whether it's manual or not. The point is there are more options as a physical normal than not.

    i for one would like to get out of the chair soon or know no other will be confined to the shit of a thing (life sucks), being disablied.

    I would really like to enjoy sex agian like it was.

    before flaming this i am not against those that support cure and enjoy life just those that will not help by suppoorting the concept or doing something for cure like bagging it.

  3. #23
    I work at one of the VA, Spinal Cord Hospitals and I have the honor of being around the oldest living SCI patients in the world. These are men that were hurt back in WWII and have been living with SCI for 66 years. These are not men that are in their 80's and 90's that have been recently hurt, these are the original SCI patients who were not expected to live. Two years was what they were told they might survive. They did not have anything you have at your disposal including hope. These aren't men who have been stuck in the hospitals or nursing homes. They have lived long and productive lives. Even when we bitch and complain about access and handicap parking they had to suffer without any of this 40 years prior to the ADA. Think of everything that has happened in the world the past 66 years and now think of it in a chair, one more reason they are the Greatest Generations..............I for one can't wait to grow old in this chair.

  4. #24
    "I for one can't wait to grow old in this chair. "

    While I respect and understand your admiration for these guys who have served their country and spent so long in wheelchairs, I find the above remark frankly ludicrous.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    "I for one can't wait to grow old in this chair. "

    While I respect and understand your admiration for these guys who have served their country and spent so long in wheelchairs, I find the above remark frankly ludicrous.
    Why? Currently the only other option is not growing old in a chair.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Them Bones's Avatar
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    Thanks for compiling, Doc.

    The main point that I got from it was that SCI hasn't been the dominant factor in life expectancy for a few decades now. And I am glad to hear it.

    I play basketball, ride a handcycle, and work out but still consider myself to be 100% sedentary. Seems like we keep hearing about studies on how sitting for too long each day makes you more at risk for some life-shortening disorder or another. I take the results you show to be an indication that long-term health is still very much in our control. With care, good diet, excercise, and diligence the SCI is only a perturbation for our health.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by POPO367 View Post
    I work at one of the VA, Spinal Cord Hospitals and I have the honor of being around the oldest living SCI patients in the world. These are men that were hurt back in WWII and have been living with SCI for 66 years. These are not men that are in their 80's and 90's that have been recently hurt, these are the original SCI patients who were not expected to live. Two years was what they were told they might survive. They did not have anything you have at your disposal including hope. These aren't men who have been stuck in the hospitals or nursing homes. They have lived long and productive lives. Even when we bitch and complain about access and handicap parking they had to suffer without any of this 40 years prior to the ADA. Think of everything that has happened in the world the past 66 years and now think of it in a chair, one more reason they are the Greatest Generations..............I for one can't wait to grow old in this chair.
    Right on. These guys are responsible for me being here today. I received encouragement and other help from a few of them back in the early years of my SCI.

    Getting to old can be an exciting trip. However, it is afterward that is not so much fun, as most elderly people know. I can best describe it as a slide back toward where I was on day 2 of my injury.

    I understand why people say that life with SCI sucks. However, they assume that they would not fall victim to cancer, other trauma, mental illness, or other calamity had the SCI not happened. In the end, we have to live with whatever life throws at us, and often it is not roses.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  8. #28
    I think this is great news and more and more therapies and medications are being developed. I had children prior to having a SCI. I do my best to stay healthy so that I can be around to watch them grow. Life is unexpected and I agree that if you did not have an SCI that some other ailment would not happen as well. Very few folks live their lives without misfortune. I am big fan of dealing with bad right away and lingering on the good part of life. More I dwell on the BAD SO TO SPEAK the more the GOOD passes. Just my own .02.

  9. #29
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isildur View Post
    Good info, but I don´t see the point in surviving for so long. Quad for 30-40 years? No thanks, is already a nightmare ending the first 10.
    My husband has a high level cervical injury. He can shrug his shoulders and turn his head, and that's it. He has sensation only from about 5 inches below the shoulders up. He would, and does on occasion, fight tooth and nail to survive and he has done so for 24 years. He wants to continue fighting and never giving up until the Grim Reaper somehow wins. We have an 11 year old and a great life. Yes, his SCI SUCKS, completely totally, it really does. But he wants to live as long as possible. So don't generalize to all high level quads.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    I debated whether or not to include it in the Care or Life forum but decided to include it in the Cure forum for the following reason. The main message of the post is that people live long times after spinal cord injury. A majority of people live 40 or more years after injury. That is a lot of time to regenerate and recover. Wise.
    Well, somewhat unusual, quite original and, I would say, rather intriguing bias; so what is your approximate estimate of how long we have to survive for reaching some regeneration (restoration) checkpoint now? In 1996 that was 7 years,-gullible dumb Superman honestly endured 8 years and, dying, unlikely glorified thee a kind word. Then you have suffered a broadly discussed fit of Catharsis and the main culprit was appointed a George-weak headed-twice elected-president imbecile-the great humanist-defender of the blastocyst-doltish cowboy-w. busH. OK, now this Mega Boss is out of the game and since Reev's passing it was anothet 8 years. Thus, "now what?", will we again discuss your another Catharsis and alleviate your paroxysm of grief or will celebrate Checkpoint reaching? Some rough estimation, of course, nothing specific,-thanks to this research work we now know for sure that we are very tenacious of life and have plenty of time before the meeting with the Grim Reaper, that in itself is a cause for rejoicing.

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