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Thread: Questions for crutch walkers....

  1. #71
    I am delighted to hear that your father's shoulders seem to less stressed with the SideStix, and that his hand numbness has stopped! Although it's still early, it sounds as if the SideStix might be a big help to him in crucial areas (once individual adjustments are made). And it's wonderful that the company is so supportive and helpful.

    You're right, it's a very good idea to have a PT watch your dad as he walks. That was a big help to me on several occasions, as my gait changed and the PT spotted some things I was doing to make ambulation much more difficult than it needed to be.

    My very best wishes to your dad as he works through this adjustment period, and to you as you accompany and help him!

  2. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    I am delighted to hear that your father's shoulders seem to less stressed with the SideStix, and that his hand numbness has stopped! Although it's still early, it sounds as if the SideStix might be a big help to him in crucial areas (once individual adjustments are made). And it's wonderful that the company is so supportive and helpful.

    You're right, it's a very good idea to have a PT watch your dad as he walks. That was a big help to me on several occasions, as my gait changed and the PT spotted some things I was doing to make ambulation much more difficult than it needed to be.

    My very best wishes to your dad as he works through this adjustment period, and to you as you accompany and help him!
    Thanks Bonnette. We really appreciate your input and support as well!

  3. #73
    For what it's worth. I first measured my sidestix according to the youtube video they have up, but have since lengthened it about an inch. Having the extra length allows me the option of lifting myself up high when I get tired and sloppy with my legs. When I'm tired and sloppy with my legs, I tend to hike up my hip rather than using the hamstrings to clear my foot through the stroke.

    If I'm well rested and attentive, I can just walk with the crutches a bit wider than usual and it brings it back down to the approximate height a perfect measurement would suggest.
    L2 incomplete with a pretty bad limp since 10/31/2011.

  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by shveddy View Post
    For what it's worth. I first measured my sidestix according to the youtube video they have up, but have since lengthened it about an inch. Having the extra length allows me the option of lifting myself up high when I get tired and sloppy with my legs. When I'm tired and sloppy with my legs, I tend to hike up my hip rather than using the hamstrings to clear my foot through the stroke.

    If I'm well rested and attentive, I can just walk with the crutches a bit wider than usual and it brings it back down to the approximate height a perfect measurement would suggest.
    That's very helpful, shveddy - I do the same thing when I'm tired. I'm going to put my crutches up a notch and see if it helps. Thank you!

  5. #75
    Thank you Shveddy. That is interesting, and just the sort of description we were looking for.

  6. #76
    Junior Member
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    I have a few questions myself.

    My daughter after 5 years is finally (at the moment) trying to walk a bit more, outside therapy. She uses Walk easy forearm crutches. I am thinking of getting her the tornado tips I see mentioned. Do the Fetherman tips work with walkeasy, are they better than the Walkeasy tornado tips?
    She isn't complaining of shoulder pain, yet. But, don't want her to either.

    What is the big difference between sidestyx or walkeasy forearm crutches?

    She can do 30 minutes on the treadmill, with her AFO's. Just an FYI.

    She is walking around house with AFo's and crutches, but then she can't carry her drinks etc.

    When are you walkers walking? I guess I want her to walk as much as possible, but when we go out, I don't really want to be pushing her chair behind her so she can have her personal items she needs at any given moment. She is a long ways from being ready for rough terrain. Still has trouble with the hip flexors being tight, not standing straight. I have quit nagging her a few years ago, and just now she is finally in the mood again , and has more time, which helps. Any suggestios here?

    Of course, no butt muscles, or much of hamstrings and no calfs at all. Bad drop feet.

    Thanks for any suggestions and for letting me share.

  7. #77
    Senior Member novanoin's Avatar
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    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana, USA
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    273
    I use walk easy crutches model 492 (www.walkeasy.com) and the tornado rain gel tips from Thomas Fetterman
    Mimi

  8. #78
    Junior Member
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    Where the wind blows and the air is fresh in Nebraska
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    novanoin,
    Do you find the Thomas Fetterman tornado tips on the walkeasy site? I was thinking it was a different brand?

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by mom23 View Post
    I am thinking of getting her the tornado tips I see mentioned. Do the Fetherman tips work with walkeasy, are they better than the Walkeasy tornado tips?
    They are the same product.

    Quote Originally Posted by mom23 View Post
    What is the big difference between sidestyx or walkeasy forearm crutches?
    Hopefully arndog will respond on that - price, weight, and interchangeable tips are the biggies.

    Quote Originally Posted by mom23 View Post
    She is walking around house with AFo's and crutches, but then she can't carry her drinks etc.

    When are you walkers walking? I guess I want her to walk as much as possible, but when we go out, I don't really want to be pushing her chair behind her so she can have her personal items she needs at any given moment.
    The whole carrying things problem is one of the reasons to use a wheelchair for daily activities and the crutches for therapeutic purposes. I don't have a good answer. When I used crutches on a day to day basis I carried a messenger bag (cross body strap, bag behind me resting more or less on my butt).

  10. #80
    It sounds like my father's injury is similar to your daughter's.

    He uses crutches pretty much all the time he is outside the house. He uses crutches a little inside, but on the main floor of his house he uses a wheelchair the most so that he can carry things. He also uses his walker when he wants to carry things in the house, and has trays, baskets and bags on his various walkers.

    So he doesn't get a lot of walking in unless he leaves the house. Of course, the more you walk, the better.

    For carrying things with crutches... it's hard. You need to have an assortment of carrying devices, and as you increase your core strength/skills, you can follow this video below on how to carry things short distances. We like this guy.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TEfM5Y8S5M

    My father uses at different times a back-pack, or a smaller "man-bag" crossing his shoulder/chest (that he carries all the essentials everywhere - wallet, calendar, meds, cath kits, emergency medical info, calendar etc...), and a phone holder around his waist (can find at sports stores - holds his cell phone, some money/credit cards, when he wants to carry the minimum). He also found these nice little "crutch wallets" and has one on each crutch. He keeps a little money in these, or keys.

    http://justwalkers.com/nova-ortho-me...lutch-bag.html
    http://www.juvoproducts.com/cane-caddy-pages-45.php

    But it's a little risky to have too much weight in a crutch wallet/purse, or it can totally throw off your balance.

    Definitely the Fetterman tornado tips are the best, and now even SideStix uses the tornado tips on their high-end crutches.

    My father had Walk-Easy crutches + tornado tips for many years, and now has SideStix (with tornado tips). You can read Arndog's posts for details on them, and please go to SideStix site and watch their videos (also on Youtube). Basically, the SideStix crutches are much more durable (carbon fiber, few moving parts to stretch and breakdown) with much better quality accessories (grips, cuffs) and ergonomically designed. They are helping my father's hands/carpal tunnel syndrome and shoulders. They have built in shock absorbers (if you buy the pricier pair) that can only be a good thing for long term crutch walkers.

    For my father, it doesn't make sense replacing a pair of Walk-Easy crutches every 2-3 years, cuffs 1-2x per year. Hopefully, one pair of SideStix will last him indefinitely.

    And they look nice.

    You will have to fight with your insurance company to pay for them, but if you spend some time building a good letter of medical necessity and convince them it will save the INSURANCE company money in the long run.... but needing fewer replacements, and saving your daughter's joints... then maybe you can get them covered. Talk with the SideStix owners (very very nice) about whether they have found an American distributor yet, which may facilitate insurance coverage.

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