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Thread: Aqua Therapy

  1. #1
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
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    Aqua Therapy

    Starting aqua therapy with my son on Wednesday. Really looking forward to him being able to feel some freedom again. After these rehab session we will be installing a lift in our pool so he hopefully can enjoy the summer somewhat.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
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    k we had our first session yesterday, my son was as angry as a hornet's nest going there (think he was uptight). water was about 90 degrees, he got a great workout and his PT told him that he should be able to swim on his own without floatation devices by the end of our sessions(Mid July). The most remarkable thing though was after he got home his mood was noticeable upbeat. We have not seen a smile on his face that was not induced by some beers in a long time. He ate his dinner outside with a friend and was in such a good mood. Good enough to make fun of the 25+ pounds I have gained since his accident. I really don't like be called rolly-polly but he made me laugh so it ain't all bad. His girlfriend swears it was the aqua therapy. Maybe just the knowledge that he will gain some mobility without being in a chair

    All in all maybe our first good day since the day before he was injured
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  3. #3
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    I recently started going to the pool, it really loosens up a stiff body. As he does it more, he might find a cooler pool works better and doesn't wear him out as quickly. I have a lot of spasms after using a therapy pool @90 degrees. The 85 is better and even the lap pool @80 is better yet. I've never ever learned to swim or float. 6th lesson in and I can float/swim on back and turn myself over in water. I can also tread water for a little over a minute with no assistance. I think getting in a pool seems just as good as a good stretching if not better.

  4. #4
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
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    Sounds great we have a heated in ground pool in our yard. My son was injured as a lifeguard so he absolutely loves the water. So we can wait until all the home mods are done so we can open the pool
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  5. #5
    It would appear as though your son got some benefit from the Endorphin Effect: http://www.naturaltherapypages.com.a...ise_Endorphins
    Exercise decreases the stress hormones such as cortisol and increases endorphins. Endorphins are the body’s natural feel good chemicals, and when they are released through exercise, your mood is boosted naturally. As well endorphins, exercise also releases adrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine. These chemicals work together to make you feel good.

    Endorphins are defined as hormone-like substances that are produced in the brain and function as the body’s natural painkillers. During exercise, these endorphins are released, and this can produce feelings of euphoria and a general state of wellbeing. The endorphins produced can be so powerful that they actually mask pain. Physically active people recover from mild depression more quickly and physical activity is strongly correlated with good mental health as people age.


    Hope swimming (I prefer, "hey, lets go swimming" to "Aqua Therapy" which sounds like mandatory, boring, rehab work) continues to help him.

    All the best,
    GJ

  6. #6
    Muskie... I wish your son has great progress..the pool will help him in manys ways that the rehab he can do on land.

  7. #7
    Senior Member jschism's Avatar
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    if he could swim before, he should be able to now. it's not like our legs have turned in to a brick causing us to sink, it just a matter of relaxing, just like learning to swim for a healthy able bodied person. Now learnig to balance himself and building up some core strength might take time. depending on his level of injury he may have a hard time turning his head to get air while swimming face in water, this might require use of a snorkel.

  8. #8
    Muskie, I'm very glad to hear how much your son enjoyed the pool!

    Regarding the water temperature, 90 degrees sounds very high to me - over time, it might rob him of energy. Here's what SCI-Nurse KLD had to say about it in another thread:

    How warm is the pool where you are working out? If it is over 80F, that is too warm for someone with a SCI or MS. 75F is recommended. Often "therapy" pools are kept at around 85F for people with arthritis and other orthopedic conditions, which is too warm for someone with SCI or MS. You no longer have the ability to regulate your body temperature normally, so you can get too warm in a too warm pool. The same goes for hot tubs, which should not be over 104F for someone with an SCI or MS, and should be limited to no more than 5-10 minutes of use (and never alone). Weakness can be an early sign of overheating and even early heat stroke.

    (You can read the entire thread here)

  9. #9
    Senior Member muskie's Avatar
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    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Muskie, I'm very glad to hear how much your son enjoyed the pool!

    Regarding the water temperature, 90 degrees sounds very high to me - over time, it might rob him of energy. Here's what SCI-Nurse KLD had to say about it in another thread:

    How warm is the pool where you are working out? If it is over 80F, that is too warm for someone with a SCI or MS. 75F is recommended. Often "therapy" pools are kept at around 85F for people with arthritis and other orthopedic conditions, which is too warm for someone with SCI or MS. You no longer have the ability to regulate your body temperature normally, so you can get too warm in a too warm pool. The same goes for hot tubs, which should not be over 104F for someone with an SCI or MS, and should be limited to no more than 5-10 minutes of use (and never alone). Weakness can be an early sign of overheating and even early heat stroke.

    (You can read the entire thread here)
    Thanks for the info folks, I was starting to sweat thinking of heating 15,000 gallons of water to 90 degrees. We went away for a week once and left my daughter in charge of the house of course she had a party and one on her genius friends heated the pool to 95 for a week it only cost me 2 grand that month for gas usage
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  10. #10

    any tips on preventing bowel accidents in pool?

    Muskie, I'm so glad your son is enjoying the pool and I hope it helps his recovery -- so many PTs I know swear by the benefits of hydrotherapy.
    My son (C5-6 incomplete) also loves the water and has done a bit of hydrotherapy with instructors. There is a pool in our apartment complex and he has been in it a few times but he is terrified of having a bowel accident while in the pool so this is preventing him from using it more. He does the bowel programme (suppositories) every second day, and bowel accidents have so far been very rare (twice in two years I would say). However, if something happened in the pool it would be completely humiliating for him and it would be the end of him being allowed to use the pool. I was wondering if there's an adult equivalent of the swimming diapers used by kids? (My kids never used them so I'm not really sure how they are designed or how they work.) We would be so grateful for any advice on this.

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