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Thread: What do you do when you get a flat?

  1. #11
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    Dale you must have all your Boy Scout badges. Good to have a pump with you. I just trust I will be able to get back to the vehicle, put in a new tube and find a gas station with a compressor and a GoodSamaritan willing to pump it up for me... Hasn't happened yet. <knocks on side of head>

    my worst-case scenario is handcycle. I rip around un-burdened because even with a full complement of tools I'd still never get the long-stem presta valves out with my somewhat gimpy fingers. Never leave home without my cellphone and some cash.

    Maintenance goes a loooong way, though.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by 47+years View Post
    LOL

    My sister and I decided to take a stroll down the 1/2 mile lane to our family farm. When we got to the end of the road we looked down and saw my tires were full of goatheads! We left them in, so got back okay, but my husband spent his evening patching 70+ holes.
    Oh, no, you're reminding me of my year traveling to Albuquerque. Talk about goatheads!

    In my book, 70+ holes = new tubes.

  3. #13
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    I carry a tire patch kit and a spare tube in my car. One thing I strongly suggest is checking the tire yourself after it's been repaired, I had a vendor that would just slap in a new tube but never actually examined the tire to see what was causing the flat-ended up with repeated flats, after changing two tubes within 45 minutes he finally got his act together. Also had blowouts because tubes were not installed correctly by friends. If you take care of your tires/tubes and watch where you're wheeling you really shouldn't have to worry too much about flats. Personally I wouldn't consider the worry of flat tires as a reason to switch to solids unless you were ending up with a flat every other week or something. Between medical supply dealers, bike shops and friends/family being stuck with a flat isn't very high at all on my list of thngs to worry about.

  4. #14
    Senior Member brian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Them Bones View Post
    Sure you can reduce the risk of a flat, but the impact is huge if you get one. What if you're in the rain, or with a group of people, or any of a million other really uncomfortable situations.
    If you're in the rain you'll get just a little more wet than you would otherwise. If you're with a group of people you'll all make a joke and they'll help push you. It's only as big of a deal as you make it.


    Quote Originally Posted by canuck View Post
    One thing I strongly suggest is checking the tire yourself after it's been repaired, I had a vendor that would just slap in a new tube but never actually examined the tire to see what was causing the flat-ended up with repeated flats, after changing two tubes within 45 minutes he finally got his act together. Also had blowouts because tubes were not installed correctly by friends.
    If you have decent use of your hands it's sooooooooo easy to change your own tire. It only takes 5 minutes and that way you know for sure it's done right.

  5. #15
    Senior Member canuck's Avatar
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    That's the problem Brian, I'm a para but because of Spina Bifida my motor skills really suck, I'm uncordinated to the extreme

  6. #16
    I was getting monthly flats... desert + no pavement = flats. I switched to solids 3 years ago and have no desire to go back. Little harder to push, but that just gives me a better workout all day long. I change my tires once a year, using shox 110 psi. My life is unpredictable enough as it is with bowel, bladder and skin issues... taking back a small amount of that by eliminating flats is not so much about fixing flats, but piece of mind and quality of life.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Them Bones's Avatar
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    dr.zapp! Yes!

    Just one less thing to worry about!

  8. #18
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    I got my first flat the other day. It happened before heading in to a store from the parking lot. So turned around and my roommate reloaded the chair into the car and ran in to walmart to pick up a tube for me. He changed the tube without even removing the tire, and I had my air compressor in the car. Lucky I was with him. The heat caused it, 105 heat index.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  9. #19
    Neighborhood bike shop. Do not trust a DME to be able to change a tire. Trust him to charge you your firstborn for a shitty job. With regular pressure maintenance (once per week), flats are unlikely. I've had explosions with HP tires but I don't worry about my tires much beyond maintenance anymore since switching to 37-540s @ 80 PSI.

    I can't change my own tires so I do the best I can to watch where I'm going and keep tabs on the condition of my chair.

    Can't control everything.

  10. #20

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