Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 59

Thread: The Meaning of Flaccidity and Muscle Atrophy after Spinal Cord Injury

  1. #11
    Originally posted by Kenney:

    Thanks Wise
    Kenney, you are welcome. Wise.

  2. #12
    Wise, how far are we from human clinical trials with stem cells?

    Jan

  3. #13
    SEP's are activated by stimulating a peripheral nerve and recording the response in the brain and spinal cord. If one sees a sensory volley heading into the spinal cord through the peripheral nerve in question, it means that the peripheral nerve is intact. Since both motor and sensory fibers travel in the peripheral nerve, the only places where the damage can be is at the ventral root or in the spinal cord.
    Hello Wise,
    Thanks for talking about SEP. I've done that in 1983, they stimulated both posterior tibial and sciatic poplite nerves and they recorded signals at the ear lobe at a speed of 37.6 ms, so they said my injury is incomplete. Anyway, I'm still ASIA A - level T12... What does that mean?...
    Thank you very much.
    George

    Check out my little carecure forum in french at http://www.paratetra.net

  4. #14
    Originally posted by FellowHawkeye:

    Wise, how far are we from human clinical trials with stem cells?

    Jan
    Jan, I don't know. As you know, everything depends on having an available source of stem cells. While there has been a lot of work done on bone marrow and umbilical cord blood stem cells, there is also a lot of controversy concerning some of the early reports that these cells stimulate regeneration or improve recovery in spinal cord injury models. Although there have been studies as far back as 1999 or even earlier suggesting that fetal or embryonic stem cells are beneficial in animal models of spinal cord injury, neither of these sources of cells are readily available in the United States. Fetal cells are available in China and Russia and consequently that is where there are some clinical trials.

    Finally, there is the problem of funding. I am sorry to always return to this subject. At the present, with no federal funding of fetal or embryonic stem cell trials allowed, the only source of funding would be private or industry. With the exception of a handful of biotech companies, industry is afraid of having anything to do with embryonic or fetal stem cells. Furthermore, they really do not see a business model with adult stem cells. Therefore, funding of both embryonic and adult stem cells has simply not be available.

    Given this situation, I think that we are now farther away from human clinical trials with stem cells than we were in 1999. This was predicted by many people in 2001 when President Bush quashed all possibilities of using embryonic stem cells for therapy. My hope is that adult stem cells will develop faster and be ready for clinical trials in the next several years.

    Wise.

  5. #15
    Originally posted by George du Chesne:

    Hello Wise,
    Thanks for talking about SEP. I've done that in 1983, they stimulated both posterior tibial and sciatic poplite nerves and they recorded signals at the ear lobe at a speed of 37.6 ms, so they said my injury is incomplete. Anyway, I'm still ASIA A - level T12... What does that mean?...
    George,

    I am not sure. I suspect that they did not record the potentials from your earlobes... perhaps they used those as the ground points. When you mentioned that you have a T12 level, are your referring to the vertebral injury level or to the neurological level? Do you have any sensation in your feet?

    Wise.

  6. #16
    George,
    I am not sure. I suspect that they did not record the potentials from your earlobes... perhaps they used those as the ground points. When you mentioned that you have a T12 level, are your referring to the vertebral injury level or to the neurological level? Do you have any sensation in your feet?
    Wise.
    Wise,
    No sensation in my feet, I'm full ASIA A, T12-L1 vertebral injury, sensory L2, with following motors scores on both sides: psoas=2+, sartorius=3, adductors=2, quad=1. I guess it shows that something is passing on L3. But concerning the positive SEP recorded at 37.6 ms from both tibial and sciatic nerves, I've never had any clear explanation about the meaning of that. They said too that I have an active conus medullaris... All my muscles are working either with brain command or electrostim. Wise, what do you think I should do ?... Do you think I should go to OEG or else ?...
    Thanks
    George

    Check out my little carecure forum in french at http://www.paratetra.net

  7. #17
    george,

    I think that you would be be a candidate for OEG transplant. As you know, I have been suggesting to people that they be patient for at least six more months. I hope that by that time there will be more data concerning the long-term recovery of the patients, whether administration of methylprednisolone at the transplant is useful, and whether or not repeated transplants produce sequential improvements in function. In addition, as you know, there is several therapies that are coming into clinical trials probably in the coming year.

    Wise.

  8. #18
    Thanks Wise !...
    I agree to wait for the next year. I'm now 45 yo, within the next 5 years I think I have to go...
    George

    Check out my little carecure forum in french at http://www.paratetra.net

  9. #19
    "My hope is that adult stem cells will develop faster and be ready for clinical trials in the next several years."

    I hope so too, Wise! Thanks.

    Jan

  10. #20
    Jan, fortunately, I don't think that we have to wait for stem cells to begin to produce some recovery in people. While stem cells are important and provide an important option, particularly in people who have had neuronal loss, a number of the therapies that are being carried out do not involve stem cells at all. For example, the olfactory ensheathing glial (OEG) cells are not stem cells. There have been several reports that bone marrow cells or umbilical cord blood transfusions will improve recovery in stroke and spinal cord injury, as well as myocardial infarcts. However, there is much controversy concerning the ability of these cells to produce neural cells when transplanted. Wise.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •