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Thread: Pain victims find ray of hope

  1. #1

    Pain victims find ray of hope

    I was asked to post this.


    The pain was so bad that Donna Elliot couldn't stand the sheet touching her toes at night. Her muscles were twisted in knots, and it felt as if sharp needles were piercing her feet.

    For Duane Axelton, burning pain was part of his life, 24 hours a day. He couldn't sleep, eat or walk without being reminded of his debilitating disease.

    Both Elliot and Axelton had been diagnosed with diabetic neuropathy. In diabetics, high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, causing decreased blood flow to the extremities. The resulting nerve damage, called neuropathy, can leave its victims with little or no sensation in their feet -- and sometimes, as for Elliot and Axelton, with burning, constant pain.

    Doctors prescribed medication for Axelton, which did little to help his sleepless nights. But in 2003, a diabetes educator told Axelton about an innovative new form of technology called monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE), which causes a release of nitric oxide from the bodies red blood cells, and in turn creates better blood flow and circulation.

    Infrared had been used to help heal the legs of injured racehorses, and it was believed it could have the same effect on humans. Axelton was the first person in Coos County to receive the infrared treatment for his neuropathy -- a disease that doctors once told him would plague him for the rest of his life.

    'Within one week the pain was a little less intense," he said. 'After two weeks I noticed a little less pain. After a couple months there was a big difference, and today I am pain-free."

    Elliot is also pain-free today because of infrared.

    'The first time I went in for treatment, I came out pain-free for over a day," she said. 'It was amazing to me the difference it made. After a couple of months, nothing bothered my feet."
    Full Article


    What it's approved for

  2. #2
    From what I understand of diabetic neuropathy and how it differs from neuropathic pain from SCI, in DN the neurons are damaged by decreased blood flow. It sounds like it may be helpful for someone with DN (which can certainly include some people with SCI), but I don't see where it would help with the neuropathic pain from a traumatic event that most people here are dealing with.

  3. #3
    I read it as having other benefits also:
    infrared is FDA cleared to increase circulation and decrease pain. It is used to treat conditions including repetitive strain injuries, broken bones, sprains, fibromyalgia, frozen shoulder, plantar fasciitis, diabetic neuropathy, contractures, trigger finger, carpal tunnel, tarsal tunnel, sciatica, ruptured disks, degenerative disks, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, neuralgia, gait imbalance, postural deviation and erectile dysfunction.

    Read more: http://theworldlink.com/news/local/w...#ixzz1r6mqKDna
    Helga

  4. #4
    I don't see how it could help CNS pain which has no "mechanical" aspects like poor circulation or muscle pain but rather is pain caused by the brain and spinal cord nerves being scrambled up like with a spinal cord injury. If id did I am sure pain clinics would be using it for SCI patients treatments.
    Lu

  5. #5
    Senior Member ColonusFan's Avatar
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    Question Spend two hours in the tanning bed...

    ... and call the doctor in the morning?

    I am a sprinkle of doubtful. I would like to be wrong about my doubt, but I have more inkling towards E-STEM {Electrical Stimulation} with a direction of pain relief as well as prevention of muscle atrophy. For IR {infrared} to work I think more research might be warranted. These are similar wave lengths that all the tanning bed critics have been pointing the cancer finger towards. If it can just give relief to some one else whom struggles with chronic pain, like myself, ALL THE BETTER.

    Who knows Microwaves might be next.

  6. #6
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    I am highly skeptical. I don't think any of us with pain who can't even stand a bed sheet at times would be able to undergo something being placed directly on the skin.

    I tried some braces that were supposed to stimulate the muscles and I have never ever felt so much pain. Bio something or other they were called. I could only take five minutes and it took two weeks for the burning to subside.

    Like others are saying ours is not caused by circulation which is the case in diabetic neuropathy and I would question if it was even the same kind of pain. Not that one pain is worse than the other. I have never had diabetic neuropathy but I am sure it is painful.

    But the tanning bed does feel wonderful LOL
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  7. #7

    to dark eyed daisy

    I wrote in a while back looking for info on neurostimulation. Aside from not reading a single good review, no one wrote back. I have a compression fracture at L-2, have harrington rods from L-1 to L-3. I have some motor to my knees, use afo's for ankles and feet, and cane for walking and standing. I'm going on 8 yrs. New doctor put me on Oxycodone, 10-325 up to 5 per day.
    I'm just a half a bottle through but don't see a huge difference other than wanting to sleep more. He took me off neurontin and norco. Upped my cymbalta from 60 to 90 mg and kept me on zanax.
    I get a little relief from the Oxycondone, but only for a hour or so.
    New doc suggested if the drugs didn't work, going for the neurostimulation.
    I go back to him tomorrow, but am going to decline the surgery, there just wasn't enough info to go through such a drastic undertaking. If i had read where people here were getting relief from SCI pain,i would have considered it.
    You seem to be very knowledgeable here, could i get some in put from you?
    I have the massive burning on butt, and sometimes clear to my feet.
    Any ideas before i go back in tomorrow?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by springville girl View Post
    I wrote in a while back looking for info on neurostimulation. Aside from not reading a single good review, no one wrote back. I have a compression fracture at L-2, have harrington rods from L-1 to L-3. I have some motor to my knees, use afo's for ankles and feet, and cane for walking and standing. I'm going on 8 yrs. New doctor put me on Oxycodone, 10-325 up to 5 per day.
    I'm just a half a bottle through but don't see a huge difference other than wanting to sleep more. He took me off neurontin and norco. Upped my cymbalta from 60 to 90 mg and kept me on zanax.
    I get a little relief from the Oxycondone, but only for a hour or so.
    New doc suggested if the drugs didn't work, going for the neurostimulation.
    I go back to him tomorrow, but am going to decline the surgery, there just wasn't enough info to go through such a drastic undertaking. If i had read where people here were getting relief from SCI pain,i would have considered it.
    You seem to be very knowledgeable here, could i get some in put from you?
    I have the massive burning on butt, and sometimes clear to my feet.
    Any ideas before i go back in tomorrow?
    I don't have any answers on the neurostimulation other than if it were me and my legs, I don't think I would NOT do it either.

    Have you tried other drugs lyrica, Topamax, gabapaentin? Topamax works better for me but it doesn't take all the burning away. It makes it tolerable most days. Narcotics work for some and not for others. There are other narcotics that work better for others. Amytryptaline @20 mg is another one that is discussed here but if you are already on Cymbalta, they may not combine the two.

    I weened off Cymbalta back in December when it stopped working.

    You can read some posts by Arndog and Dejerine in the Pain forum.
    They are much better with the different Medicines and treatments than I am. However our injury levels are very similar so I do understand your pain, anxiety, and frustration when not finding relief.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

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