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Thread: Hi guys, I'm new and have a few question.

  1. #1

    Smile Hi guys, I'm new and have a few question.

    Hi,

    My name is Stuart and I'm a newbie. I've heard many good things about these forums though, so I am looking forward to getting involved.

    I'm not really sure if anyone can help me with this, as I'm not sure if this site is exclusive to issues associated with spinal injury but anyway, I thought I'd give it a shot.

    I have Cerebral Palsy (specifically spastic diplegia) and I am currently looking to upgrade my 7 year old Quickie GPV - I've heard good things about the Tilite Zra but my question is: does anyone know of a way to stop my legs shooting off the footrests whenever I put effort into my propulsion? When I play basketball, I strap them back but it's not the most practical solution for the long term, since it causes a lot of pain in my quads after an hour or so. My current front frame angel is 70 degrees to try and 'catch' the spasms as much as possible but I would ideally like something closer to 90 to make the chair more practical.

    Has anyone heard of anything like guards on the footrest to wedge my feet behind? If not, do you think it would be possible to do?

    If anyone has ideas or knows of solutions already out there, I would be so grateful to hear about them.

    Stu

  2. #2
    Get industrial velcro put the fuzzy stuff on your shoes and the hookie stuff on the footrest (I am not joking)

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ipenguin View Post
    Hi,



    Has anyone heard of anything like guards on the footrest to wedge my feet behind? If not, do you think it would be possible to do?

    Stu
    That is used in some sport chairs, so i don`t see where is the problem to do a footplate for your needs.

    I can see you are from England, so contact Spokz for some special footplate.
    Last edited by totoL1; 04-01-2012 at 12:42 PM.

  4. #4
    Thank you t8burst & totol1...Like I said, I've just tried to make the best of it up until now but since the new chair will be a significant upgrade, I want to get everything planned to the last before committing

  5. #5

    General Set-up Advice

    First of all, can I say sorry for asking this if it comes up a lot but I've searched the forums and while I see a lot about specifics, there isn't really anything on general 'first' daily chair.

    I suppose I should give a little background. I have Cerebral Palsy and since I can walk short distances, in the past I have used a chair if going on long trips or if I have specific muscular issues. However, over the last year or so the strain on my body has reached a point where I need to use a chair most days. If I don't, it's highly likely I would have to leave work for an extended period and perhaps all together.

    As you might imagine, this is NOT something I want to happen, so I'm looking to get a chair to use everyday. I've been looking at Tilite chairs; people on here seem to like them. But beyond that, I really don't have a clue what to look for.

    I'm particularly unsure about things like casters, rear wheel types and tires (both in terms of makes and sizes) & axle types (for example is Aluminum strong enough to last for say 5 years plus?).

    I'm from the UK and our wheelchair provisions are frankly terrible (hugely expensive compared with the states) - So I don't really have anywhere for advice.

    I am fully mobile in my core and upper body. I'm 5ft 7 and weigh 160lbs. I will be using the chair for between 6-7 hours a day for at least 5 days a week.

    What would your general advice be in terms of what to look at including but also what might not be needed. I want a solid, practical chair that isn't going to be too heavy but also something that's ok value for money. General starting point advice

    Sorry guys for the super long ramble but I could really do with some advice as I really don't know what I'm talking about and don't want to make any big mistakes.

    Stu

  6. #6
    Skateboard deck tape works for some people.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ipenguin View Post
    . . . I'm particularly unsure about things like casters, rear wheel types and tires (both in terms of makes and sizes) & axle types (for example is Aluminum strong enough to last for say 5 years plus?). . . .
    Everything depends on personal preference, so you need to decide some things. But before that, Let's introduce you to "adjustability" so you'll have a better idea of what you can adjust/configure/change on a chair to suit your preferences after you own it.

    A "hospital" chair is heavy and non adjustable; stay away from them.

    "Ultralight" chairs (in the USA, coded as K0005 or K0009) are available in varying degrees of adjustability from fully-welded, non-adjustable (potentially very light, but for users who know exactly what they want) to super adjustable/configurable. So you'll need to decide how much adjustability you want.

    You'll also need to decide whether you want a folding or rigid ultralight. TiLite makes both. (Disclaimer - I like my TiLite chair, but it's my first chair; I've owned no other.) And you'll need to decide what frame material you want (common choices are aluminum (6000 or 7000 series) and titanium - less common are magnesium and carbon fiber). (note: hospital chairs are made of steel.)

    The ZRA you mentioned is exactly like my AeroZ except for frame material (titanium versus 6061? aluminum) and some hardware (I have a Series 1, which is no longer available). The ZRA is a typical "fully adjustable" ultralight (COG, RSH, backrest height, backrest angle, and footrest length are readily adjustable within given ranges; FSH is minimally adjustable, and often requires minor hardware changes. Different manufacturers have different approaches to achieving adjustability.

    The Icon wheelchair (introduced last fall) is "configurable": COG, RSH, backrest height, backrest angle, FSH, wheelbase, caster position (wide, narrow, front, back, up, down), seat width, seat depth, etc., etc. are readily adjustable within ranges. To my knowledge, it's the only configurable chair on the market. It has a very long development history by two wheelchair-user friends - a sport enthusiast (JeffAdams - the previous poster) and a machinist (ChristianBagg).

    That said . . .

    casters: what terrain will you be on most frequently? Diameter, width, hub material, and type of tire are all choices depending on terrain and personal preference.

    rear wheel: again terrain is important, but here personal preference carries more weight, and handrim choices come into play, as do spoke types and configurations and desired camber. 24" (540mm) wheels are ubiquitous; some users prefer 25" (559m); 26" (590mm) are also available (generally for sports).

    Tires: solid, pneumatic, solid inserts. With solids and inserts, flats will never be an issue, but pneumatics typically roll easier, and they're lighter. Again terrain is a factor regarding tire width and tread. Pneumatics require regular maintenance (weekly inflation).

    Axles: rigid chairs have continuous axles; folders have two axle tubes (one for each side). Do you curb hop or descend stairs regularly? That puts extra stress on axles, and you may want to consider an Oracing or Lasher chair (like CCC user totoL1). If you don't often hop or descend stairs, a continuous aluminum axle should last you 5+ years.

    If power assist is in you future, it raises some special considerations, too.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by chasmengr; 04-02-2012 at 12:09 PM.
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by chasmengr View Post
    Everything depends on personal preference, so you need to decide some things. But before that, Let's introduce you to "adjustability" so you'll have a better idea of what you can adjust/configure/change on a chair to suit your preferences after you own it.

    A "hospital" chair is heavy and non adjustable; stay away from them.

    "Ultralight" chairs (in the USA, coded as K0005 or K0009) are available in varying degrees of adjustability from fully-welded, non-adjustable (potentially very light, but for users who know exactly what they want) to super adjustable/configurable. So you'll need to decide how much adjustability you want.

    You'll also need to decide whether you want a folding or rigid ultralight. TiLite makes both. (Disclaimer - I like my TiLite chair, but it's my first chair; I've owned no other.) And you'll need to decide what frame material you want (common choices are aluminum (6000 or 7000 series) and titanium - less common are magnesium and carbon fiber). (note: hospital chairs are made of steel.)

    The ZRA you mentioned is exactly like my AeroZ except for frame material (titanium versus 6061? aluminum) and some hardware (I have a Series 1, which is no longer available). The ZRA is a typical "fully adjustable" ultralight (COG, RSH, backrest height, backrest angle, and footrest length are readily adjustable within given ranges; FSH is minimally adjustable, and often requires minor hardware changes. Different manufacturers have different approaches to achieving adjustability.

    The Icon wheelchair (introduced last fall) is "configurable": COG, RSH, backrest height, backrest angle, FSH, wheelbase, caster position (wide, narrow, front, back, up, down), seat width, seat depth, etc., etc. are readily adjustable within ranges. To my knowledge, it's the only configurable chair on the market. It has a very long development history by two wheelchair-user friends - a sport enthusiast (JeffAdams - the previous poster) and a machinist (ChristianBagg).

    That said . . .

    casters: what terrain will you be on most frequently? Diameter, width, hub material, and type of tire are all choices depending on terrain and personal preference.

    rear wheel: again terrain is important, but here personal preference carries more weight, and handrim choices come into play, as do spoke types and configurations and desired camber. 24" (540mm) wheels are ubiquitous; some users prefer 25" (559m); 26" (590mm) are also available (generally for sports).

    Tires: solid, pneumatic, solid inserts. With solids and inserts, flats will never be an issue, but pneumatics typically roll easier, and they're lighter. Again terrain is a factor regarding tire width and tread. Pneumatics require regular maintenance (weekly inflation).

    Axles: rigid chairs have continuous axles; folders have two axle tubes (one for each side). Do you curb hop or descend stairs regularly? That puts extra stress on axles, and you may want to consider an Oracing or Lasher chair (like CCC user totoL1). If you don't often hop or descend stairs, a continuous aluminum axle should last you 5+ years.

    If power assist is in you future, it raises some special considerations, too.

    Hope this helps.
    Wow...Thanks for the amazing reply!

    I've had a Quickie GPV for about 7 years - It was already used but the person I brought it from was very similar sized so, at least for what I needed it for at the time, it was fine but now I'm using it daily, I need something a lot lighter and made to measure.

    Terrain I deal with most includes cambered sidewalks, also some road type surfaces. Occasionally some rougher terrains but certainly nothing 'off-road'

    The GPV has solid tires and while they're practical because you can take them everywhere, they're also very heavy. Can I ask...How long on average do pneumatic tires last? I know I won't be in the chair 24/7 but will still have to deal with fairly heavy use.

    Again, thank you for such a full reply

    Stu

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Get industrial velcro put the fuzzy stuff on your shoes and the hookie stuff on the footrest (I am not joking)
    I didn't realize you were a walker. My suggestion really isn't practical.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ipenguin View Post
    Terrain I deal with most includes cambered sidewalks, also some road type surfaces. Occasionally some rougher terrains but certainly nothing 'off-road'

    . . . Can I ask...How long on average do pneumatic tires last? I know I won't be in the chair 24/7 but will still have to deal with fairly heavy use.

    Again, thank you for such a full reply

    Stu
    With your terrain choice, I would choose 5" diameter with wide (1.25-1.5") softroll tires. I prefer aluminum hubs, but they cost more. Plastic hubs would work for you, but they're less durable IMO. If you're considering any type of power assist, aluminum hubs are a must as are double-sided forks. (If you never did rough surfaces, you would like 4" more. Offroad, you'd want 6-8" diameter and maybe a pneumatic tire. Mostly inside, smooth terrain = 3" diameter with court tire (hard & narrow).)

    Oh, and be aware the larger and heavier the caster is, the more prone to flutter it is. I loved how my 6" TiLite aluminum-hub casters rolled, but their propensity to flutter drove me to 5" FrogLegs, which I like much better.

    Pneumatic tire longevity depends greatly on the original tread style, on keeping them inflated properly, how often you skid to a stop, and the terrain.

    For a good all purpose tire I recommend the Schwalbe Marathon Plus Evolution (MPE). It's high-pressure (120-140psi), narrow (25mm) tire, with a puncture resistant liner. It's a bit heavy as narrow pneumatics go, but lighter than a solid. With average use and proper inflation (use Schwalbe tubes, too), they should last a couple years. Improper inflation can ruin them in 6 months or less. I love mine - I'm a light user (only use my chair outside the house, and I'm not employed), have had mine about 15 months, and they still have great tread (and I often skid to a stop). I weigh about 210#.

    If you want really easy rolling tires, try Schwalbe SpeedRuns (SR); If you want super easy pushing, and aren't concerned about an occasional flat, try Schwalbe RightRuns (RR). (If you haven't already noticed I'm a Schwalbe fan, too.)

    You're welcome.
    Last edited by chasmengr; 04-02-2012 at 03:41 PM.
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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