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Thread: Best base boards for a wheelchair?

  1. #1

    Best base boards for a wheelchair?

    I'm buying a house soon with really pretty laminate flooring, but I'm thinking about replacing the base boards since I have an unfortunate habit of scraping them up. I was thinking about 6 inch knotty pine or some other hard wood that hides scratches well. I saw something similar in a restaurant that looked nice. What do you guys think?

  2. #2
    I've got six inch cypress baseboards unstained and they have held up well. Good luck finding something that will work for you!

  3. #3
    We have 8 inch stained pine - I love them! They look good, and stand up well to the wheelchair.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by BoyFallDown View Post
    I'm buying a house soon with really pretty laminate flooring, but I'm thinking about replacing the base boards since I have an unfortunate habit of scraping them up. I was thinking about 6 inch knotty pine or some other hard wood that hides scratches well. I saw something similar in a restaurant that looked nice. What do you guys think?
    What kind of baseboards are in the house you are buying?

    All the best,
    GJ

  5. #5
    Just the standard thin, 3-4 inch white baseboards. Something like this http://www.runwaydaily.com/.a/6a00e5...3769970c-popup

  6. #6
    See profiles at:
    http://www.invitinghome.com/baseboar..._molding.htm#1

    Shock resistant baseboard is 20% stronger than pine wood. All baseboard molding from this collection manufactured of High Definition Polymer System (HDPS). This amassing material is not just extremely durable but environmentally safe as well. Environmentally friendly Microcellular material does not contain any PVC, CFC, or Formaldehyde. Baseboard made of this material is fully recyclable, hypoallergenic and have outstanding moisture-resilient qualities.

    A comparative baseboard molding study was conducted on the moisture-resilient capabilities of molding made from wood, MDF, and HDPS. All the various types of moldings were immersed in 92°F water for 180 hours. On the left-side picture (lower image) you can see that the baseboard made from our High Definition Polymer System did not change it's dimensional qualities, on other hand baseboard made from MDF almost doubled in size due to water absorption and swelling (the upper image). To learn more about this experiment click on following link - molding's moisture resilient qualities study

    Our high quality baseboard offers maximum long-term protection against scratches and dents. This baseboard is ideal for high traffic areas and commercial applications.


    A friend used limestone. It looks great, but can be pricey.

    All the best,
    GJ

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    See profiles at:
    http://www.invitinghome.com/baseboar..._molding.htm#1

    Shock resistant baseboard is 20% stronger than pine wood. All baseboard molding from this collection manufactured of High Definition Polymer System (HDPS). This amassing material is not just extremely durable but environmentally safe as well. Environmentally friendly Microcellular material does not contain any PVC, CFC, or Formaldehyde. Baseboard made of this material is fully recyclable, hypoallergenic and have outstanding moisture-resilient qualities.

    A comparative baseboard molding study was conducted on the moisture-resilient capabilities of molding made from wood, MDF, and HDPS. All the various types of moldings were immersed in 92°F water for 180 hours. On the left-side picture (lower image) you can see that the baseboard made from our High Definition Polymer System did not change it's dimensional qualities, on other hand baseboard made from MDF almost doubled in size due to water absorption and swelling (the upper image). To learn more about this experiment click on following link - molding's moisture resilient qualities study

    Our high quality baseboard offers maximum long-term protection against scratches and dents. This baseboard is ideal for high traffic areas and commercial applications.


    A friend used limestone. It looks great, but can be pricey.

    All the best,
    GJ

    I didnt think about this option. I'll have to look into this. Stone would be ideal i think, but like you said, very expensive.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by BoyFallDown View Post
    I didnt think about this option. I'll have to look into this. Stone would be ideal i think, but like you said, very expensive.
    You aren't limited to limestone, there is marble and granite. It all comes down to how much linear feet you need to cover and your budget. I've seen pics in architectural mags with stainless steel base shoe applications as well. Then there is always putting in Formica base shoe and a quarter round or any baseboard product and quarter round that acts as a bumper and helps keep you away from the baseboard itself.

    All the best,
    GJ

  9. #9
    I just got home from an appointment with a new doctor. While I was waiting in the consultation room, I noticed the baseboard material. The baseboards were about 6 inches high and made from a dense, short pile carpet. The strip of carpet had been finished with a fabric tape (to match the color of the carpet material) on the top and then applied to the wall. The flooring was finished with commercial carpet squares that had a pattern. The carpet baseboard was a dark color to match one of the colors in the patterned carpet squares.

    http://www.daltonhospitalitycarpet.c...-installations

    All the best,
    GJ

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    We put Saime porcelin tile in our newly renovated bath and the walk in closet. This paticular style looks and really feels like stone complete with ridging and swirl relief. But being porcelin the cleaning is a breeze. It is offered in several colors and they sell bull nosed tiles for baseboards. We used the tile baseboard in the bath and kept the original cherry baseboards in the walkin closet to go with the door between the two areas. Cheaper than real stone, more than wood. My problem is next to the bed where I back my powerchair tip bars into the wall above baseboards. And no, no way to remove the tip bars.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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