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Thread: Footplate bumper wheels

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    2

    Footplate bumper wheels

    I dropped into the local rehab hospital today to pick up a brochure about a fitness program.

    It was late on a Friday afternoon and the place was like a ghost town. I was driving my new to me Quickie Rhythm. New since November to me. I think it's actual manufacture date is 2006. It's a terrible power chair, universally despised by local DME suppliers as unsuitable for our salty climate + a Delphi controller. Oh well. I had to beg for it. There is no universal health care in Canada when it comes to DME. Every province has their own standard and my province is probably one of the worst.

    But I digress. While at the rehab I saw a empty mid wheel drive PC with a foot plate that had what looked like two inline skate wheels mounted horizontally at the leading corners of the plate. It was brilliant. I have a healthy fear of spazzing my way through a plate glass door [Saw it happen to someone when I was young. It's not something you forget].

    I use my chair like a pickup truck that has a 10-15 block radius. That puts the local farmer's market, grocery stores, hospitals, library, etc. in my sights but it also means that I come home with cloth bags full of food, books, etc. hanging off the back of the chair. I have to pass through 2 plate glass doors in an airlock arrangement and my apartment door to get in and out of my building. Seeing those wheels on that chairs footplate was a revelation.

    I have been using manual chairs since the mid 80's and have had to rent PC's occasionally when I couldn't use my manual, usually after surgery. I have never driven something as squirrelly as my current chair whether its under load or not.

    If anyone has done this to their footplate and has documentation I would love to see it. It seems like it could be a DIY proposition. If you have done it do you believe it makes a difference?

    Sorry to be so verbose. It's my first post and there is so much I want to talk about.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Welcome to the Care Cure Community "soneil,"

    I hope I am understanding your request. Is this what you are looking for?

    There are instructions here:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Wild...ds-and-bumper/

    All the best,
    GJ

  3. #3
    As above-->>
    There is a guy here who has wheels on the outside corners of his footplates to push doors open. I need some too because my foot plates are sharp and are gouging a groove in my wooden door.

    I have been forgetting to look in thrift shops. I know I'll find an old skate board, roller skates or razor scooter in one. I have all the drills, tools etc parts already.

    It is for sure an outstanding idea.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW View Post
    As above-->>
    There is a guy here who has wheels on the outside corners of his footplates to push doors open. I need some too because my foot plates are sharp and are gouging a groove in my wooden door.

    I have been forgetting to look in thrift shops. I know I'll find an old skate board, roller skates or razor scooter in one. I have all the drills, tools etc parts already.

    It is for sure an outstanding idea.
    Wheels as bumpers may help, but I would guess the wheels may still cause gouges in a wooden door.

    All the best,
    GJ

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    2
    Question asked and answered, with illustrations!

    You know this internet thing might help people share knowledge. It could catch on eventually.

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Welcome to the Care Cure Community "soneil,"

    I hope I am understanding your request. Is this what you are looking for?

    There are instructions here:
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Wild...ds-and-bumper/

    All the best,
    GJ
    Actually, the most important thing to keep the footplates from bending inward or outward after making contact with walls, doors, or obstacles is that seemingly insignificant anti-rattle collar that has slid down to the bottom of the extension tube. It serves a much more important purpose than most people realize. The only way to properly seat it so that it won't quickly come off again is to remove the extension tube, put the anti-rattle collar back on, and firmly tap the legrest on the floor.

    I always try to do this on a new chair. It would be nice if the manufacturers used some sort of adhesive during assembly at the factory. If the collar slides down and isn't put back, the number days that the footplates stay straight will be numbered.


  7. #7
    If you never flip your footplates up when you transfer, Bodypoint's extension tubes are extremely durable (the gray section has splines which fix the angle once tightened down).

    On this Torque SP, I used them with the angle adjustable foot platform and hardware used on the Quickie GT to make a fixed front end. The extension tubes are extremely strong--evidenced by the pic of my feet while I was standing on the footplate.

    Combine those extension tubes with rollers at the front corners of your footplates and you will probably have a legrest that can withstand opening doors.


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