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Thread: Who Will Pay for Tomorrow's Medical Breakthroughs? Ron Cohen CEO Acorda Therapeutics

  1. #1

    Exclamation Who Will Pay for Tomorrow's Medical Breakthroughs? Ron Cohen CEO Acorda Therapeutics



    Speakers:
    Ron Cohen, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Acorda Therapeutics, Inc
    Michael Rawlins, Chairman, National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence
    Ellen V. Sigal, Ph.D., Chair and Founder, Friends of Cancer Research
    Reed Tuckson, M.D., Executive Vice President and Chief of Medical Affairs, UnitedHealth Group
    Brook Byers, Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
    Moderator:
    Margaret Anderson , Executive Director, FasterCures/The Center for Accelerating Medical Solutions

    Even if we are successful at getting new treatments through the R&D and approval process, the question remains whether payors will be willing to pick up the tab for them. As the U.S. moves to significantly reduce healthcare costs, concern abounds that the scientific trajectory towards more personalized treatments will be squelched by the countervailing pressure to pay only for treatments deemed most effective in large populations of patients. What role are insurance coverage decisions - and insurers themselves - playing farther upstream in the R&D and investment process? Can patient groups bring harmony to the marriage of comparative effectiveness research and personalized medicine?

  2. #2
    This is a very good topic and why I think that a cure for paralysis, even though it has scientific barriers, is more of a political and economic question.
    We will have to decide how healthcare is paid for in the future. One way, which seems like the more current way of thinking, is to give out healthcare with an eyedropper, thus the question which is posed in your blurb. The other way is to rethink the whole thing.
    In America Senator Bernie Sanders is sponsoring the Medical Prizes Innovation Act.
    Instead of summarizing the bill, I'll leavve you with an interesting article. Actually, if you do a google search for 'prizes not patents' (I often confuse this with prizes not profits, you'll get a lot more information.
    http://www.pharmalot.com/2011/06/pri...g-discovery-2/

    Joseph Stiglitz, a nobel laureat in economics, has also written extensively about this topic. Here's a little taste.
    http://www.project-syndicate.org/com...s--not-patents

    My concern is that in our current world, where private interests are rewarded with profits, usually from the public purse, researchers who actually come up with the stuff (and are often funded by the public purse until a company picks up their work because they smell profit) are often the least rewarded.

    Both articles actually show the lack of any real need for big pharma.
    Last edited by StemCells&AtomBombs; 03-23-2012 at 12:26 AM. Reason: made a mistake
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  3. #3

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by StemCells&AtomBombs View Post
    Both articles actually show the lack of any real need for big pharma.
    FasterCures Hosts Town Hall with NCATS Leadership
    On February 27, 2012, approximately 1,000 people joined NCATS Acting Director Dr. Thomas Insel for a virtual town hall meeting about the new NIH Center. Participants from the academic, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, nonprofit, advocacy and patient communities had opportunities to ask questions about NCATS. Hosted and moderated by FasterCures Executive Director Margaret Anderson, the forum focused on the role of the new center and how it would collaborate with these groups to advance translational science.

    View the archived webinar, presentation materials and FasterCures' related blog for the full story. Visit FasterCures to learn about future webinars.

    NCATS was established Dec 23, 2011. Click on the archived webinar from last month.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 03-23-2012 at 01:03 AM.

  4. #4
    I still have to watch this webinar but I will as it sounds very interesting.

    Here is something interesting that I was reading in the paper (yes, the real paper made of paper) just now.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...109128,00.html

    Very interesting figures on healthcare delivery throughout the world.
    I was most shocked at the price difference of a simple MRI in America and France. I guess I watch too much American TV because I always thought that MRIs were really really expensive and wondered why my doctor gave them out like candies. I guess it's just in America the high price of MRIs.
    So if an MRI is so expensive (and not because MRIs are intrinsically expensive as per the French example), how are we going to pay for cure.
    What I would hate more than anything is a division between the haves and the have nots on walking, BandB, etc.
    I'm not naieve (spelling??) And know that this already exists in all areas of healthcare already, but don't find any need to expand this inequality.
    Anyhow, healthcare has always been very interesting to me since I am from Canada and in Japan we had to fight like hell just to get foreign workers on public health insurance, and because of this could go on for hours.
    Maybe this forum isn't the best place for this discussion, but on the other hand, maybe it's the most appropriate place. What will we do when the cure comes and no one will pay for it. You all can't move to Canada and Japan (even here this problem will arise but I think will be less of a factor).
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  5. #5
    I still have to watch this webinar but I will as it sounds very interesting.

    Here is something interesting that I was reading in the paper (yes, the real paper made of paper) just now.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...109128,00.html

    Very interesting figures on healthcare delivery throughout the world.
    I was most shocked at the price difference of a simple MRI in America and France. I guess I watch too much American TV because I always thought that MRIs were really really expensive and wondered why my doctor gave them out like candies. I guess it's just in America the high price of MRIs.
    So if an MRI is so expensive (and not because MRIs are intrinsically expensive as per the French example), how are we going to pay for cure.
    What I would hate more than anything is a division between the haves and the have nots on walking, BandB, etc.
    I'm not naieve (spelling??) And know that this already exists in all areas of healthcare already, but don't find any need to expand this inequality.
    Anyhow, healthcare has always been very interesting to me since I am from Canada and in Japan we had to fight like hell just to get foreign workers on public health insurance, and because of this could go on for hours.
    Maybe this forum isn't the best place for this discussion, but on the other hand, maybe it's the most appropriate place. What will we do when the cure comes and no one will pay for it. You all can't move to Canada and Japan (even here this problem will arise but I think will be less of a factor).
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

  6. #6
    I think we'll need to be working with the groups that are negotiating and working with the providers. They'll need the data to show the expense of sci as opposed to the price of any therapy that's brought to the market. It's a huge piece. Maybe less of a problem if we get some of the groundwork laid in advance with some of the other orgs that are seeing this coming.

  7. #7
    I think it's like your signature says:

    "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizen can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." Margaret Mead
    Dennis Tesolat
    www.StemCellsandAtomBombs.blogspot.com

    "Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom."
    Martin Luther King

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