Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: From Reeves foundation

  1. #1

    From Reeves foundation

    this is an old reply I got from the Reeves foundation. I reread it thsi weekend and thought it was appropriate for for the forum.
    Tony:

    The field of spinal cord injury (SCI) research is young, really only about 30 years old. In the early 1980s, the accepted dogma was that once injured, the spinal cord could not be repaired. In the decades since then, there have been numerous breakthroughs in our understanding of how the uninjured spinal cord works and what happens at the cellular and molecular levels after a traumatic injury to the cord. These breakthrough studies are the foundation upon which the current field of spinal cord research is built and they give us confidence that the promise of effective treatments for spinal cord injury is real.

    The spinal cord is an extraordinarily complex tissue. When it is injured, many different kinds of cells die, first as a result of the actual trauma to the cord and then later, over days and weeks and perhaps months, as a result of chemical and immune system
    responses to the original injury. In addition to paralysis, there are other health-related consequences of SCI, including possible loss of bowel, bladder and sexual function, cardiovascular and pulmonary malfunctions, loss of bone density and the risk of decubiti, pain and spasticity.

    There is research being done around the world on all of these issues related to SCI. We understand that because of its complexity, there cannot be a single "cure" for spinal cord injury. There will be carefully orchestrated cocktails of treatments, tailored to the individual patient. These combination therapies will be determined by things like the age and medical condition of the patient; the kind and level of injury, when the injury occurred and other factors as well. Scientists, clinicians and many patients themselves no longer think in terms of a single cure (i.e., recovery of walking) but rather speak about a continuum of incremental "cures." Weaning a patient from a ventilator, promoting recovery of bowel or sexual function, preventing life-threatening pressure sores and the dangerous havoc unleashed by autonomic dysreflexia - all are "cures," treatments that will improve the health, quality of life and independence of individuals who are spinal cord injured. These kinds of effective therapies are within our reach.

    The Reeve Foundation invests in research that ranges from very basic discovery science (neuroprotection, regeneration, rehabilitation, secondary consequences of SCI) to clinical networks that deliver certain kinds of intense exercise therapies to patients and that test promising SCI therapies in human clinical trials. We are more committed than ever to our goal of helping to develop treatments that will profoundly change and improve the lives of people living with spinal cord injury.


    Rob


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pakistan
    Posts
    1,166
    Dear Anthony still nothing for sexual and bladder bowel function anywhere.

  3. #3
    JaWAID, dR SILVER SAYS THAT HIS TRIALS WITH ANIMALS show significant responses to bowel, baldder, breathing adn othere fundtions. the meeting that I'm waiting for is on April 7th. I don't know what to expect. We need some fast track trials with good potential to start soon; perhaps this one will fit the bill.

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Anthony, what is the meeting you mention on April 7th?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by keeping on View Post
    JaWAID, dR SILVER SAYS THAT HIS TRIALS WITH ANIMALS show significant responses to bowel, baldder, breathing adn othere fundtions. the meeting that I'm waiting for is on April 7th. I don't know what to expect. We need some fast track trials with good potential to start soon; perhaps this one will fit the bill.
    I thought you might find this of interest: http://www.christopherreeve.org/site..._the_Chase.htm
    Every day I wake up is a good one

  7. #7
    Cheese, thanks. Silver has said all along that breathing, bowel and bladder and perhaps sexual function might be repaired with his strategy. Wise Young is the on ly one to talk walking at thsi time. Perhaps Stem Cell Inc could provide it if their theory works. Slow, painfully slow, but moving. I hope that Wise and Silver, who both have 30+years at this, want to see success in their lifetime.

    anthony

  8. #8
    If anyone wants the entire issue of Progress in Research, send me an email and I will send you a PDF copy.
    Every day I wake up is a good one

  9. #9
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lutz, Fl USA*********C456
    Posts
    2,288
    cheesecake, hook me up please


    lunasicc42@
    Last edited by cheesecake; 03-19-2012 at 07:57 PM. Reason: prevent spam to lunasicc
    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    cheesecake, hook me up please


    lunasicc42@
    Done. I responded to the PM as well. Others can also feel free to send a PM vs. posting your email for spam bots
    Every day I wake up is a good one

Similar Threads

  1. The Reeves’ legacy still shines
    By Leif in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-21-2006, 11:21 AM
  2. Christopher Reeves Paralysis Foundation Donates to Tri-Cities Hospital
    By Max in forum Funding, Legislation, & Advocacy
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-22-2005, 01:58 PM
  3. Rusty Reeves
    By marco25 in forum Life
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-30-2004, 04:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •