Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: So what does an architect usually cost?

  1. #11
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    9,722
    Sue, so a slab is not good regarding frostlines? I kind of envision some sort of semi-rural property with a junky old place on it. Tear it down and build a one-level place that is completely accessble for maintanance/repair, etc. I do want a big lot so I can play Farmer Brown on a lawn tractor or something, lol. And the space would do good for my other hobbies. But the main thing is one level, right now I have a 3 flat that you can imagine is not too good for a wheelchair. I have a backyard lift for my place, and dragging myself up a flight of stairs to inspect something on another floor isnt too cool. Right now I have a guy that plays building super for a roof over his head, but I'm really thinking of getting out of the income property scene and bail on the city life. Timeframe is TBD...waiting to get laid off still.

    I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch. Oh yeah, not a lot of rooms for the sake of rooms, real open floorplan.

    One can dream . The whole sticking point is employment...as long as I have it I'm pretty much stuck here. And doing something like this closer to work is useless IMO as it is downtown, so reasonable seed property would make for a horrendous commute.

  2. #12
    Caveat!!! Not all architects understand universal design or designing space with various levels of disability in mind. You may need to do a lot of homework to bring an architect on board with your ideas. Keep that in mind...how much work you have to do to bring the architect up to speed...how much the architect brings to the table...how much the architect is really worth. If you have a great grasp on your needs, codes, and the type of design you are seeking, you may only need a draftsman to alter plans and ideas you like and prefer.

    All the best,
    GJ

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch.
    depends how much coin you want to drop... check this...

    http://www.us.kohler.com/bold-indepe...wAll=false&go=

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Caveat!!! Not all architects understand universal design or designing space with various levels of disability in mind.
    this is true.

    my wife and I are working on a new project that addresses this very issue.

  5. #15
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    11,007
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Sue, so a slab is not good regarding frostlines? I kind of envision some sort of semi-rural property with a junky old place on it. Tear it down and build a one-level place that is completely accessble for maintanance/repair, etc. I do want a big lot so I can play Farmer Brown on a lawn tractor or something, lol. And the space would do good for my other hobbies. But the main thing is one level, right now I have a 3 flat that you can imagine is not too good for a wheelchair. I have a backyard lift for my place, and dragging myself up a flight of stairs to inspect something on another floor isnt too cool. Right now I have a guy that plays building super for a roof over his head, but I'm really thinking of getting out of the income property scene and bail on the city life. Timeframe is TBD...waiting to get laid off still.

    I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch. Oh yeah, not a lot of rooms for the sake of rooms, real open floorplan.

    One can dream . The whole sticking point is employment...as long as I have it I'm pretty much stuck here. And doing something like this closer to work is useless IMO as it is downtown, so reasonable seed property would make for a horrendous commute.
    http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatal...n=3&nitem=cat0 Second row, middle. It's not much space but if I had the balance the bubble version would be a dream. And bubbles are easy self cleaning as they blow out when done. A lift is easier to add while building but you don't need it now just plan for it. Good ones are anchored in the above ceiling. Later you can add tracking that is actually kind of sculpture like then medical looking.

    Yea, deep freeze and slabs don't get along and that slab will settle and in 5 to 10 years you'll be redoing tiles or wood flooring. Actually a realtor friend has seen a lot of laminate on slabs even in Maryland and they tend to warp. Have an emergency basement only with your furnace and stuff in a first floor utility room. With a flip down, emergency battery back up stair ramp to the basement for tornado season you're set for both caring for your utilities and have a safety cubby.

    Basically you're looking for an estate break up sale? That's when the grandparents left a decent farm in equal parts to their kids and now a kid has died and the grandkids want their cut. Those run 50-200 acreas. Or are you looking for something more like 5 acres in an area that is zoned for residential/small farmette? The first I'd talk to a friend in law and figure out where to find such listings. County Farm Agency types in your state would probably be a good place to start because they know the gossip. Up here I'd head to a BIG real estate company for the first. For the second, time for a road trip. They are turning cornfields into golf courses faster than I ever dreamt possible in the souther counties. I mean my last high school reunion was held in the middle of a place I know I corn detasseled during high school. But there are a lot of small places around the rather picturesque smaller towns we've been exploring with some rather old and decrepit farmhouses on them. If your hobbies include water front on even a creek watch prices rise. We had an Air Force friend who retired to something around maybe 20 acreas over in the Richland Center area. Happy guy until he needed to replace the little bridge over a small creek to get to his place. He had so many state agencies up his butt so nothing got polluted or was less than perfect I was surprised. With Walker in office that has probably changed. Nothing says you can't build a terrific one story out in the pasture land but I wouldn't do it without a basement. My guess is you're less likely to have pipes freeze too. Time to start googling, Dude. I'd start with the slab question. If they will work then try to find a place with a smaller concrete silo as your safety cubby and make it part of the house. Yes, with many of these farms that were split up between a lot of kids you can get a silo on 5 acres on occasion.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219
    why not look for a ranch style slab design and just modify it? theres plenty of those

  7. #17
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    9,722
    Thanks for the tips, so I'll be thinking a basement of some sort. Heck, a steep ramp going there might work instead of stairs/tracklift...just add a rope, lol. I'm not looking for a giant farm, just maybe a couple acres where I can grow a nice grass field on it and maybe surround the property line with evergreens to delineate it. A modified existing structure might work also...probably be cheaper too.

    I dont think a lift for the tub would be overly needed, IIRC just keeping the tub full for boyancy and going up a corner worked well.

    Ideally I'd love the property to be ajacent to a good size hill too...would be awesome to have a nice backstop on-site for another old hobby .

  8. #18
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    11,007
    I think a steep ramp of poured concrete would cost you more because of the rods to reinforce the concrete and you'd need a rail on the open side. The pan lifts I've seen have only been used for basements. They look rather easy to install and are very easy to use plus I'd bet one would be much cheaper overall. They also flip out of the way so it doesn't look 'gimpy' which is a biggy for me.

    If you really can handle a real hot tub then I'd plan in or renovate one into a glass sided 4 season room. You can make it private with those remote controlled Hunter Douglas blinds. ;-)

    LOL I'm not about to guess your hobbies. But if one includes growing certain plants the counties up here seem to have added detecting those plots into their county park ranger jobs. They call in the back up from their sheriff when they find one. Your own private target range is normally ok as long as you're a certain amount of yards out of an incorporated town or city. If you're into shooting feel free to invite me over. Well, after my radial nerve heals. The Madison Area Paralysis Group actually has some fun stuff you can try out with them from shooting, pontoons, the local concert venues and it seems some are young enough to camp on the ground. I'm up to cabins with beds and room service.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  9. #19
    How about finding a lot where you could have a walkout basement? They are very popular here in New England.Just a thought.

    Thanks for the tips, so I'll be thinking a basement of some sort. Heck, a steep ramp going there might work instead of stairs/tracklift...just add a rope, lol. I'm not looking for a giant farm, just maybe a couple acres where I can grow a nice grass field on it and maybe surround the property line with evergreens to delineate it. A modified existing structure might work also...probably be cheaper too.

    I dont think a lift for the tub would be overly needed, IIRC just keeping the tub full for boyancy and going up a corner worked well.

    Ideally I'd love the property to be ajacent to a good size hill too...would be awesome to have a nice backstop on-site for another old hobby .
    Tough Times Don't Last...Tough People Do!

  10. #20
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    9,722
    Hey, that is a good idea! Didnt think of that (things are real flat around here, but I hope to escape sometime, lol)

Similar Threads

  1. Home Modifications Architect???
    By Rrrrronnn in forum Life
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-21-2009, 10:20 AM
  2. Stem cell architect is knighted
    By Faye in forum Cure
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-31-2003, 08:58 PM
  3. Architect tries to improve safety
    By Max in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-14-2003, 09:56 AM
  4. Acclaimed architect stricken by spinal infection, paralysis
    By Leo in forum Spinal Cord Injury News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-13-2003, 01:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •