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Thread: Vinyl covering Activeaid padded seats.

  1. #1
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Vinyl covering Activeaid padded seats.

    http://activeaid.com/products/raised...ats/model-202/



    I have an activeaid 202 raised toilet seat, just like the one above. I've totally babied it trying to get as much life out of it as possible as it works really well for me. After 18 months the vinyl has started to split. It really seemed like it would last much longer the vinyl seemed way better than 18 months. Very annoying to say the least. Everything else about the seat is great. Activeaid want $190 for the replacement seat portion !!!!!!!!
    That is just the seat, no legs, no back rest, no arm rest.

    My question does anyone know of a company that does seamless vinyl covering? I'd be happy to pay just to get it recovered, but haven't had any luck finding anywhere. Activaid say they outsource the vinyl covering to a 3rd party, of course they won't tell me who. May be a company in Indiana?

    Figure it's worth a try.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    I found a product that may work just great for these types of seats. It is actually sold to repair vinyl covered foam pool lounge chairs and floats. The product is called Super Soft Repair Kit. Search for it on the internet. I know of at least one outliet:
    http://www.poolcenter.com/pooltoys_f...air_floats.htm

    When you visit this page, scroll down about 3/4 of the page to the product (pictured below)

    All the best,
    GJ

  4. #4
    I posted with your same question/problem a few years ago.

    Our seat started breaking down within 6 months! My father is a big guy, so I suspect his weight (and long bowel times seated...) was a reason. We were really shocked how quickly it broke down. We called Activeaid to complain and they were quick to say there was no warranttee that covers this.

    The only advice we had from our physiatrists nurse was using electrical tape.

    The breakdown will start to spread fast...

    Tape actually works fairly well... initially.... but then starts rolling up on the edges and if you aren't careful can be irritating to the skin. We find we have to replace the tape at least every 3 or 4 months, and the splitting continues to spread (worsened by taking off the tape each time). You need to use long pieces of tape that go from underneath... across the entire portion of the cushion... and underneath on the other side. This stays intact the longest.

    We finally bought another chair (one for each bathroom) and we rotate them every 6 months or so (one is used a lot less). This also gives the foam some time to "recover".

    My Dad also really likes this chair otherwise, and the padding is really comfortable otherwise.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ~Lin's Avatar
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    Electrical tape is waterproof?

    I know years and years ago when I waitressed, we used duct tape to repair vinyl booth seats.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

  6. #6
    Sorry! You are totally right..... Duct tape is typically what we use.

    I just bought some electrical tape recently, so that was on my mind... although that would work as well but is pricier. It is usually made of vinyl. It folds a little bit nicer then the duct tape, and leave less debris behind when you peel it off.


    I do like the idea of using a liquid patch, if you could catch a tear early. It's hard because the tears like to hide in the folds/wrinkles....

  7. #7

    great

    Looks great

  8. #8
    I have the same problem- I tried the plastidip- it lasted about a week. I have already purchased 2 replacement seats in the last 4 years,so I am looking for something that will work long term too... I thought about silicone caulking, but have not tried it yet.

  9. #9
    The picture below is of a vinyl covered pool float. I thought I would post a picture of the floats I referenced in my post above (#3) just in case some of you aren't familiar with them. The "Soft Repair Kit" is especially made for vinyl covered foam and while I have no experience with it, I would think it would work just great.

    All the best,
    GJ

  10. #10

    Same problem with my Guardian 99000 shower chair.

    Guardian makes a stainless steel shower chair model number 99000 which is now discontinued. The complete parts department for this model was sold to another company. I have the same problem with the shower chair seat. After a period of time the vinyl seat starts to crack. Normally I would buy a new one for $148 which is a quick fix because you just pop the cushion off and pop the new one on and your ready to go!

    Now that all the cushions are bought up I made my own cushion for less than $50 dollars. I first purchased a 3/8" thick piece of lexan 18" x 18" which is a strong clear plexiglass material from a glass store; a store that sells or fixes glass windows and doors. A padded toilet seat from Sears Hardware, white silicon rubber and four stainless steel blots, washers and nuts.

    I tore apart the old cushion because the base is made of plywood. Using that as a template for the bolt holes and seat hole. Using a hand drill, I drilled a large hole in the center of the lexan and using a small hand saber saw cut the seat hole out. You have to be careful for the saw's speed because lexan needs a certain speed to cut it other wise you will melt the lexan and it start to become gummy.

    Once the hole is cut out I sanded the sharp edges. Removed the round seat bumpers and the hinge hardware and siliconed the tiolet seat to the lexan. Let the seat dry for a day then bolt and nut it to the shower chair. You're ready to go!

    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

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