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Thread: DMSO 4.5 yrs post injury

  1. #1
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    DMSO 4.5 yrs post injury

    i've recently started intravenous dmso treatments 3x weekly. i searched the articles on this site, but i'm still wondering if anyone can share any experience they have w/dmso. any dangers i should watch out for...side effects (other than pleasant odor)...i've had three treatments thus far, and it seems to be helping with pain levels, recovery time...less pain in knee joints and lower back (maybe due to anti-inflamotory qualities) any input is greatly appreciated...thank you!
    dusty

  2. #2
    Hmmm, interesting, I did not realize dmso was even being used anymore except as an industrial strength floor cleaner, at least I was told it was actually a floor cleaner when I was given it.

    I was originally given dmso as part of a test for reduction of swelling of the spinal cord directly after my injury in 1981 (dmso is a steriod). It proved not to work for this purpose and was never approved. Have not heard up until this point of it being used in humans for other purposes, interesting.

    "Life is about how you
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    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  3. #3
    Hi Dusty, DMSO is chemically related to DMSO2 which is MSM, a suppliment commonly used for joint deterioration, pain reduction and as an anti-inflammatory which is probably why you've experienced some relief in these areas. Unlike MSM, however, DMSO is a chemical solvent. DMSO was found to cause a range of adverse reactions and is no longer approved as a supplement &mdash it can only be used on a limited basis under medical supervision.

    As Curtis said, this was used on acute SCI's in the 80's with little benefit. You can read Dr. Young's comments about it here.

    [This message was edited by seneca on 09-22-03 at 12:50 AM.]

  4. #4
    This website has alot of info about it... www.spinalrehab.com.au/Updates/DMSO%20-%20Information.htm

    It mentions that DMSO can cross the blood brain barrier, and that it can be used in combination to help transport other things through.

    We used it on a horse long before my husband was hurt. She had kicked an iron panel and her leg was extremely swollen. The vet told me to wear gloves and paint it on with a brush. He advised not to get it on my hand. I was putting it on a 1000 lb horse (much stronger solution than used on humans) and he said if it got on my hand, I would immediately taste it in my mouth! (It's a histamine) The vet told us they regularly use it on injured race horses to get them running as quickly as possible.

  5. #5
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    curtis, seneca, redneck...thank you for your input. we use dmso on horses, and my h.s. football coach used it on me for a broken bone in my hand with good results. i'm going to try it for a month or two...the effects of each treatment only last for a couple of days...my doctor is working with stanley jacobs (OHSU/jacobs laboratories) in portland...he's been researching dmso for years...as dr. wise said, this is a therapy that has been in limbo... due mostly to politics i think...may not help to regenerate nerves, but maybe it'll gobble up some free radicals! thanks again.
    dusty

  6. #6
    Junior Member rain's Avatar
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    Dusty, just out of curiosity, are you using straight DMSO or is it combined with something else? I know on the racehorses we do use it straight sometimes, but most of the time we use it as a carrier. You are brave, I just smell the stuff and can taste it and it ain't a pleasant taste!

  7. #7
    dusty, I don't know who is recommending DMSO treatment for your spinal cord injury. This was a hot area of research in the early 1980's and I know several studies that have tried it in animals and humans without finding any significant beneficial effects. Dr. Barth Green treated a number of patients with DMSO shortly after injury in the mid-1980's and found that it was not beneficial and may even be deleterious. The following are some of the published studies. I don't think that the results are sufficient to justify use of it to treat chronic spinal cord injury.

    Wise.


    • Cherian L, Kuruvilla A, Abraham J and Chandy M (1992). Evaluation of drug effects on spinal cord injury--an experimental study in monkeys. Indian J Exp Biol 30:509-11. Summary: Contusion injury is produced experimentally in anaesthetised monkeys by weight drop method. A group of animals having laminectomy alone served as sham controls. Drugs were administered 30 min after injury initially. Naloxone and nifedipine were administered as single dose administration immediately after injury. Dipyridamole and DMSO were administered daily for a period of 1 week. Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was estimated in 2 spinal tissue segments, S1-at the site of injury and S2-the segment above the site of injury, at the end of 1 week after sacrificing the animals. Contusion injury produced significant decrease in specific activity of AchE in the traumatised segment of the experimental animals. The non-traumatised adjacent segment did not show any significant change. Nifedipine, naloxone and DMSO produced a decrease in AchE activity in S1 and S2 segments. Monkeys developed paraplegia after contusion injury. A score 2+ was observed after 1 week as compared to the score of 4+ of sham controls. Single dose administration of naloxone seemed to reverse the motor deficit by getting a score of 3+; other drugs did not produce any beneficial effect on motor deficit. Department of Pharmacology, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, India.

    • de la Torre JC (1981). Spinal cord injury. Review of basic and applied research. Spine 6:315-35. Summary: This review examines, in a condensed manner, many of the major achievements related to spinal cord injury research during the last quarter century. Most of the advances have been made within the past 10 years. They include such basic and clinical tools as evoked potentials, regional and local spinal blood flows, neurophysiologic monitoring systems, and methods that detail the morphology and contents of cord tissue. Much of the experimentation conducted within the last 25 years has provided a better understanding and clinical therapeutic approach to the injured spinal cord than at any time before. Such work has exposed significant aspects in the biochemistry and vascular mechanics associated with trauma to the cord. A growing and intriguing area of spinal injury research lies in probing the factors related to neuronal plasticity and regeneration of the cord tissue. This review also examines the role of experimental animal models as well as the clinical and experimental therapies available for acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    • De La Torre JC, Johnson CM, Goode DJ and Mullan S (1975). Pharmacologic treatment and evaluation of permanent experimental spinal cord trauma. Neurology 25:508-14. Summary: Permanent paralysis was induced in dogs by a 500 gram centimeter force injury on the spinal cord, and drug treatments were given 1 hour after injury and were continued for 3 days. Dogs were evaluated for 90 days. Isotonic saline or mannitol administration were ineffective in reversing the paralysis. In dogs receiving either dimethyl sulfoxide or dexamethasone, six of eight animals in the former and two of eight in the latter group regained partial or full recovery. The presence of somatosensory evoked responses taken before and at various intervals following trauma showed a good correlation in the prognostic recovery of each animal. It is concluded that dimethyl sulfoxide and dexamethasone can reverse a permanent experimental injury to the spinal cord when given within an hour after trauma.

    • de la Torre JC, Kawanaga HM, Johnson CM, Goode DJ, Kajihara K and Mullan S (1975). Dimethyl sulfoxide in central nervous system trauma. Ann N Y Acad Sci 243:362-89. Summary: Dimethyl sulfoxide has been tested in various experimental injuries of the central nervous system in relation to other therapies. It appears to be a useful drug in acute extradural mass-forming lesions, middle cerebral artery occlusion, respiratory anoxia, and spinal cord injuries, in rhesus and squirrel monkeys, dogs, and rats. The data from these studies suggest that in the experimental models used, DMSO is clearly superior to no treatment, and appears to be more generally effective than other comparable treatments. No satisfactory answer has yet been found to explain the beneficial effects of DMSO, but several hypothetical suggestions are offered; their validation hinges primarily on further confirmatory evidence. Further experiments with our present models and alternative research lines are discussed.

    • Gelderd JB, Fife WP, Bowers DE, Deschner SH and Welch DW (1983). Spinal cord transection in rats: the therapeutic effects of dimethyl sulfoxide and hyperbaric oxygen. Ann N Y Acad Sci 411:218-33. Summary:

    • Gelderd JB, Welch DW, Fife WP and Bowers DE (1980). Therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen and dimethyl sulfoxide following spinal cord transections in rats. Undersea Biomed Res 7:305-20. Summary: Thirty adult, male, Long-Evans hooded rats underwent spinal cord transections at the T5 vertebral level. Following surgery, animals were separated into three groups: Group I received only normal postoperative care; Group II received daily hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments for 47-54 consecutive days; Group III received the same HBO treatment as Group II in addition to subcutaneous injections of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 10 consecutive days. All animals were killed 60-70 days postlesion. The lesioned area of spinal cord was removed and prepared for light and electron microscopy. Group I animals showed typical scar reduction of cavitations, increased scarring, and more nerve fibers within the lesion. Three animals in this group exhibited coordinated hindlimb movement, with one animal showing weight-bearing ability. The lesion sit in group III animals revealed a reduction in collagen formation and a further increase in the number of nerve fibers. Six animals in Group III showed coordinated hindlimb movements; among these two displayed weight-bearing ability and sensory return.

    • Goodnough J, Allen N, Nesham ME and Clendenon NR (1980). The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on gray matter injury in experimental spinal cord trauma. Surg Neurol 13:273-6. Summary: The possible effect of dimethyl sulfoxide upon the development of lesions in the gray matter after experimental spinal cord trauma has been investigated with the use of cytochrome oxidase assay and quantitative histologic measurement of total liquefaction necrosis. Observations were made in 17 unconditioned dogs receiving an impact trauma of 400 gm cm force. Experimental animals were given 2.5 gm/kg of dimethyl sulfoxide in 40% solution intravenously one hour prior to trauma, and control animals received a similar volume of saline. No reduction could be found in the degree of loss of cytochrome oxidase at one hour after trauma, nor in the extent of acute necrosis. A slight but non-significant increase in the amount of hemorrhage was noted in gray matter at the trauma site following treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. The agent resulted in an increase in cytochrome oxidase activities in nontraumatized control gray matter.

    • Hill PK, de la Torre JC, Thompson SM, Rosenfield-Wessels S and Beckett ML (1983). Ultrastructural studies of rat fasciculi gracilis unmyelinated fibers after contusion and DMSO treatment. Ann N Y Acad Sci 411:200-17. Summary:

    • Kajihara K, Kawanaga H, De la Torre JC and Mullan S (1973). Dimethyl sulfoxide in the treatment of experimental acute spinal cord injury. Surg Neurol 1:16-22. Summary:

    • McCallum JE (1983). Improvement in somatosensory evoked response amplitude and neurologic function following DMSO in a cat model of chronic spinal cord compression. Ann N Y Acad Sci 411:357-60. Summary:

    • Muther RS and Bennett WM (1980). Effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on renal function in man. Jama 244:2081-3. Summary: To ascertain the clinical significance of dimethyl sulfoxide-induced pigmenturia, we evaluated renal function and indicators of systemic hemolysis in stable quadriplegic patients receiving the drug intravenously (IV) for spinal cord injury. Despite a dose-dependent transient hemolysis with resultant hemoglobinuria, no alteration of renal function could be appreciated. Other than the presence of urinary hemoglobin, there were no changes from baseline in the urinary sediment and all patients remained without severe hematuria. Our results indicate that patients treated with IV dimethyl sulfoxide for severe cerebral edema could serve as donors for renal transplantation.

    • Park YK and Tator CH (1998). Failure of topical DMSO to improve blood flow or evoked potentials in rat spinal cord injury. J Korean Med Sci 13:638-44. Summary: Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a well-known hydroxyl radical scavenger, which is readily absorbed through biological membranes. We studied the effects of locally applied DMSO on acute spinal cord injury. Either 10% DMSO in saline (n=8) or saline alone (n=7) was applied directly to the exposed cervical spinal cord of rats 1 hour after clip compression injury of 26 g force for 1 minute. The outcomes measured were spinal cord blood flow and evoked potentials. Spinal cord blood flow was not significantly different between these two groups. Although the evoked potentials showed spontaneous recovery after injury, there was no significant difference between the groups. In this study we failed to show any beneficial effects from topical application of high-dose DMSO on spinal cord blood flow or evoked potentials after acute spinal cord injury. Department of Neurosurgery, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul. ykapa@ns.kumc.or.kr

    • Parker AJ and Smith CW (1979). Lack of functional recovery from spinal cord trauma following dimethylsulphoxide and epsilon amino caproic acid therapy in dogs. Res Vet Sci 27:253-5. Summary: The spinal cords of 20 normal dogs were exposed via dorsal laminectomies at L1 and damaged with a direct impact force of 440 g cm. One hour later treatment with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) was started on 10 dogs and with epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA) on the other 10 dogs. Administration of the DMSO ceased at 41 h after trauma and EACA at 49 h. The results showed that neither drug had a significant beneficial effect on the functional recovery of the spinal cords, when compared to a control group of similarly traumatised dogs.

    • Shi R, Qiao X, Emerson N and Malcom A (2001). Dimethylsulfoxide enhances CNS neuronal plasma membrane resealing after injury in low temperature or low calcium. J Neurocytol 30:829-39. Summary: The inability to repair the damaged membrane may be one of the key mechanisms underlying the severe neuronal degeneration and overall functional loss seen in in vivo spinal cord injury and traumatic axonal injury in blunt head trauma. Promoting membrane resealing following damage may therefore constitute a potential effective therapeutic intervention in treating head trauma and spinal cord injuries. In our previous studies, we have shown that the axolemma failed to reseal following transection in clinically related situations, such as low extracellular calcium and low temperature. Our current studies indicate that DMSO is capable of rendering significant improvement in guinea pig axonal membrane resealing following transection in both 0.5 mM [Ca(2+)](0) and 25 degrees C situations. This was demonstrated physiologically by monitoring membrane potential recovery and anatomically by conducting HRP-exclusion assays 60 minutes after injury. Further, we have shown that the addition of DMSO in normal Krebs' solution (2 mM [Ca(2+)](0) and 37 degrees C) resulted in a decrease in membrane repair following injury. This indicates that DMSO-mediated membrane repair is sensitive to temperature and calcium. This study suggests the role of DMSO in axonal membrane resealing in clinically relevant conditions and raises the possibility of using DMSO in combination with other more established therapies in spinal cord injury treatment. Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Institute for Applied Neurology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. riyi@vet.purdue.edu

    • Zileli M, Ovul I and Dalbasti T (1988). Effects of methyl prednisolone, dimethyl sulphoxide and naloxone in experimental spinal cord injuries in rats. Neurol Res 10:232-5. Summary: The effects of methyl prednisolone (MPD), dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and naloxone were examined in 38 albino rats after making an impact spinal cord injury on the midthoracic segments with a modified Allen's weight dropping trauma method. Somatosensorial evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded before and 12 h and 14 d after the injury from epidurally inserted electrodes on the parietal cortex with sciatic nerve stimulations. Lower extremity motor functions of the animals were also examined. It may be concluded that in this study model, DMSO has a moderate effect which can be demonstrated clinically and through SEPs. Naloxone has no effect on the clinical outcome but causes reasonable improvement electrophysiologically. Aegean University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey.

  8. #8
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    rain,
    i'm taking 5cc (99.9%pure)dmso mixed with 100ml IV juice per treatment. as far as my bravery...might have more to do with intelligence(lack of... i mean)

    thanks for the info. dr. wise...i emailed dr. green concerning deleterious effects...i'm wondering what they might be. i sure appreciate the help.
    dusty

  9. #9
    Junior Member rain's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by dusty:

    as far as my bravery...might have more to do with intelligence(lack of... i mean)

    LOL, I just read on your profile that you are a retired bullrider. I have always wondered about you bullriders. (just teasin, I grew up rodeoing myself)

    I do not have any expertise in this other than using it on the horses, and have seen a few adverse reactions, though admittedly very few. Just be careful with this and really research the effects that this can have on your body, both positive and negative. Good luck!

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