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Thread: Boston Life Sciences and Childrenâ–“s Hospital find molecule key to regenerating optic nerve

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Boston Life Sciences and Childrenâ–“s Hospital find molecule key to regenerating optic nerve

    Boston Life Sciences and Childrenâ–“s Hospital find molecule key to regenerating optic nerve
    09/04/2003 10:52 AM
    Boston Life Sciences Inc. announced that scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and BLSI have identified specific carbohydrates (sugars) capable of stimulating optic nerve regeneration.

    This discovery provides an explanation as to why fish and amphibians retain the ability to regenerate their optic nerves after injury and why mammals have lost this ability.

    Fish and amphibians are known to be capable of regenerating their optic nerves throughout life. In contrast, mammals are incapable of optic nerve (or other central nervous system; CNS) regeneration after injury. This lack of optic nerve regeneration in humans is responsible for the extremely limited ability to recover eyesight after optic nerve injury or after treatment for glaucoma.

    BLSI's collaborating scientists at Children's Hospital, have previously demonstrated that such regeneration is possible in mammals, provided that certain regenerative molecules are provided. Three such molecules have been identified by a Harvard team, led by Dr. Larry Benowitz, and licensed to BLSI for potential commercial development. The newly identified fourth molecule is a sugar called mannose.

    "These studies are not only important from a fundamental neuroscience prospective, they provide BLSI with a comprehensive and proprietary approach to the problem of optic nerve and other CNS nerve regeneration," said Marc Lanser, chief scientific officer of BLSI, in a statement. "We believe that these findings have implications far beyond optic nerve regeneration. We intend to incorporate these latest discoveries into our CNS development program in order to further expand the number of potential therapeutic molecules for the treatment of stroke, spinal cord injury and eye diseases."



    http://www.masshightech.com/displaya...p?Art_ID=63461

  2. #2
    Thatss great news. I love hearing about research that's not as invasive as surgery. Tthe question is, how long will it take for something likie this to reach the general population. 8-10 years?

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    Senior Member Leo's Avatar
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    Seem's like I'm seeing more and more of these types of reports, my guess is private enterprize is going to really speed this up.

    "All you have to decide is what to do with the time that is given you."
    Gandolf the Great

  4. #4
    "The newly identified fourth molecule is a sugar called mannose."

    Mannose? Is this the same mannose used to help prevent UTI's? Does mannose cross the blood-brain barrier?

    "We intend to incorporate these latest discoveries into our CNS development program in order to further expand the number of potential therapeutic molecules for the treatment of stroke, spinal cord injury and eye diseases."

    Same intentions as Inosine? Just wondering.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Life Sciences Identify Class of Molecules That Stimulate Optic Nerve Regeneration

    Scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Life Sciences Identify Class of Molecules That Stimulate Optic Nerve Regeneration

    Business Editors/Health/Medical Writers

    BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sept. 4, 2003--


    These and Other Molecules Previously Licensed to BLSI Appear to Provide for Optimal Optic Nerve Regeneration as Described in the Current Issue of Journal of Neuroscience

    Boston Life Sciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: BLSI) announced that scientists at Boston Children's Hospital and BLSI have identified specific carbohydrates (sugars) capable of stimulating optic nerve regeneration. This discovery also provides an explanation as to why fish and amphibia retain the ability to regenerate their optic nerves after injury and why mammals (including humans) have lost this ability. The findings are published in the current issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, and are the subject of a featured review in the Journal.
    Fish and amphibia are known to be capable of regenerating their optic nerves throughout life. In contrast, mammals are incapable of optic nerve (or other Central Nervous System; CNS) regeneration after injury. This lack of optic nerve regeneration in humans is responsible for the extremely limited ability to recover eyesight after optic nerve injury or after treatment for glaucoma.
    BLSI's collaborating scientists at Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, have previously demonstrated that such regeneration is possible in mammals, provided that certain regenerative molecules are provided (JNeuroscience;2003;23;6;2284). Three such molecules have been identified by a Harvard team, led by Dr. Larry Benowitz, and licensed to BLSI for potential commercial development. The role of a fourth molecule, mannose, is the subject of the current article by Dr. Benowitz and colleagues.
    "These studies are not only important from a fundamental neuroscience prospective, they provide BLSI with a comprehensive and proprietary approach to the problem of optic nerve and other CNS nerve regeneration," stated Dr. Marc Lanser, Chief Scientific Officer of BLSI and co-author of the article. "We believe that these findings have implications far beyond optic nerve regeneration. We intend to incorporate these latest discoveries into our CNS development program in order to further expand the number of potential therapeutic molecules for the treatment of stroke, spinal cord injury and eye diseases," added Dr. Lanser.
    Mannose is a simple carbohydrate closely related structurally to the glucose. While mannose was the only carbohydrate that stimulated optic nerve regeneration in mammalian retinal ganglion cells, goldfish cells were able to utilize other carbohydrates (including glucose) and were otherwise far less restricted in the specific conditions required for their optic nerve growth. Thus, the explanation as to why lower vertebrates (but not mammals) can regenerate their optic nerve appears to be that lower vertebrate nerve cells retain the ability to respond to a relatively wide range of readily-available carbohydrates, and additionally do not require other co-factors (also identified in the current article) that mammalian optic nerve cells require in order to grow their optic nerves.
    Boston Life Sciences, Inc. (BLSI) is a development stage biotechnology company engaged in the research and development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic solutions for central nervous system diseases (CNS) and cancer. BLSI's products in development include: ALTROPANE(R) and FLUORATEC(TM) radioimaging agents for the diagnosis of PD and ADHD; Inosine and AF-1, nerve growth factors for the treatment of acute and chronic CNS disorders; Troponin I, a naturally-occurring anti-angiogenesis factor for the treatment of solid tumors; and novel therapies for the treatment of PD and ADHD.

    Statements made in this press release other than statements of historical fact represent forward-looking statements. Such statements include, without limitation, statements regarding expectations or beliefs as to future results or events, such as operating results and financial position, the expected timing and results of clinical trials, discussions with regulatory agencies, schedules of IND, NDA and all other regulatory submissions, the timing of product introductions, the possible approval of products, and the market size and possible advantages of the Company's products. All such forward-looking statements involve substantial risks and uncertainties, and actual results may vary materially from these statements. Factors that may affect future results include: the availability and adequacy of financial resources, the level of operating expenses incurred, the ability to obtain intellectual property protection, delays in the regulatory or development processes, results of scientific data from clinical trials, the outcome of discussions with potential partners, regulatory decisions, market acceptance of the Company's products, and other possible risks and uncertainties that have been noted in reports filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K.


    --30--SK/bo*

    CONTACT: Boston Life Sciences, Inc.
    Joseph Hernon, 617-425-0200
    jhernon@bostonlifesciences.com

    KEYWORD: MASSACHUSETTS
    INDUSTRY KEYWORD: PHARMACEUTICAL MEDICAL MEDICAL DEVICES
    BIOTECHNOLOGY
    SOURCE: Boston Life Sciences, Inc.

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