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Thread: rotate cuff surgery

  1. #1

    rotate cuff surgery

    Hi

    I had surgery nine weeks ago. The problem is I have been in pain. The Specialist thought. I had tentisis so he gave me pills for two weeks. After that didn't. Work he gave me a cortisone shot. That didn't. Work either. The pain goes down my arm to my thumb. The. Pain is. In my shoulder that it feels like someone is twisting the shoulder. Also my shoulder. Blade is hurting. I still sleeping in a chair. My pt says I shouldn't be in this much pain. My Dr says he agreed I shouldn't be in pain. He wont do a MRI because mu Rom is good. I am going to see another specialist. For a second opinion. I had a full tear and he also shaved the bone. I was hoping someone can help me. If anyone had this happen?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Baldwinsville, N.Y.
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    647
    I had my shoulder done in 2005. It did hurt for a few weeks. I rehabed it myself with very light free weights and built up from there. It took about six months but lifting light weights to your front and sides will really help. Just be careful. You might even want to get a second opinion. I wish you well.

  3. #3
    The Radial and Median nerves run from your shoulder to your hand including the thumb. The surgery may have damaged a nerve or scar tissue may be putting pressure on it. I suggest you ask your doc about getting nerve conduction studies done to help diagnose the problem. They are done by some physiatrists, orthopedic surgeons, and neurologists.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  4. #4

    Rotator cuff injuries.

    Let me tell you about rotator cuff injuries.

    You will have pain after your surgery.

    Ever since I sustained a spinal cord injury in 1987 I have always taken extra care of myself. Injuries do happen. I tore my rotator cuff(s) in 2007 from lifting a dumb bell. I had to get arthroscopic surgery to “anchor” the tear. I had two anchors put in.

    It first started out as a constant burning pain in the shoulder that didn’t go away. I realized I injured it because I couldn’t lift the weight above my head, not at all. I knew something was wrong. I went to see my shoulder doctor who is an orthopedic surgeon. He evaluated me first by extending my arm out and he would either push on it or have me push on his hand. He could tell you which muscle/tendon is injured.


    An X-ray is the first step to see the shoulder. I saw mine and I do have arthritis which is clearly visible. The rotator cuff injury we couldn’t see. At this visit I was given pain medicine but it only dulled the pain. So I had to get a magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, done. When the doctor reviewed the MRI I was called into his office to go over the MRI and to setup a surgery appointment. They were able to get me in within 10 days.


    Day of surgery I was at the hospital at 8:00 a.m. Three little incisions, three pokes with instruments, two anchors, stitched up, recovery and out the door by noon. Bed rest for the first three days. For an ambulatory person they would be in a sling for three months. ‘chair people the healing takes longer. Just because you get surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff doesn’t mean the pain goes away when they send you home!


    Once inside the shoulder with the scope the doctor was able to see the actual damage to the rotator cuff tendons.

    A funny thing though. When I was home I saw in the mirror this pin sticking out of my back. I thought that was the anchor? About ten days later in the shower it fell off! It was a tab the EKG machine used that a nurse didn't remove after surgery.

    I never experienced pain before during my spinal cord injury but after arthroscopic surgery. My God, (Please forgive me.) I know what severe pain is now. From 1 to 10 on the pain chart I had 10. The pain doesn’t get immediately better but worse because you just now had surgery. I was given vicodin (generic hydrocodone) and it didn’t even touch the pain. I was so miserable! I went back to see my orthopedic surgeon and he couldn’t give me any more narcotics otherwise the DEA would be knocking on our doors. He referred me to a pain management specialist who is licensed by the state to issue narcotics. I got so sick from the vicodin I ended up go to the emergency room! I was never so sick in my entire life! Not even during my initial spinal cord injury.


    After my surgery I did faithfully attended physical therapy three times a week for 90 days. That is what my insurance covered. What I learned in PT is ice and light exercise helps with pain.


    The pain management doctor was great! God bless him! We tried two pain medicines first.

    First week was one medicine that didn’t work. Office visits were weekly until the pain was under control.

    Second week we tried another pain medicine that didn’t work.

    Week three he asked, “Have I ever been on morphine?”

    I said, “Never.”

    He put me on morphine 30mg every eight hours (3x a day). It worked but it didn’t nip the pain all the way.

    Week four we increased the morphine to four times a day and BINGO! It worked! I was pain free, for now. I took it every six hours on the dime! I was on morphine for five more months until one day I missed taking my pain medicine. I went for six hours to twelve hours and no pain. I continued longer to eighteen hours and a day. No pain. Then two days. Three days no pain. The rotator cuff healed.


    Did I have withdrawal symptoms from the morphine? Yes, insomnia.


    For the next year I was easy on my shoulder. Days I was hard on my shoulder I felt a little pain but pain I was able to live with. It wasn’t until two years later I started lifting weights again. I can tell my shoulders are out of balance. The shoulder with surgery is not as strong as the non-injured shoulder.


    I had a friend who told me years ago, “After twenty years pushing a ‘chair you’re going to experience shoulder problems.” He was right in sense of the word but my injury was from a dumb bell and not pushing a manual ‘chair.


    This was my first serious injury or surgery I had post spinal cord injury. Take care of your shoulders if you push a manual 'chair. Keep your weight down and exercise your shoulders to keep them strong for years to come.


    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    The Radial and Median nerves run from your shoulder to your hand including the thumb. The surgery may have damaged a nerve or scar tissue may be putting pressure on it. I suggest you ask your doc about getting nerve conduction studies done to help diagnose the problem. They are done by some physiatrists, orthopedic surgeons, and neurologists.
    Thank you...I am seeing a specialist tomorrow for a second opinion. I will metition what you said.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by titanium4motion View Post
    Let me tell you about rotator cuff injuries.

    You will have pain after your surgery.

    Ever since I sustained a spinal cord injury in 1987 I have always taken extra care of myself. Injuries do happen. I tore my rotator cuff(s) in 2007 from lifting a dumb bell. I had to get arthroscopic surgery to “anchor” the tear. I had two anchors put in.

    It first started out as a constant burning pain in the shoulder that didn’t go away. I realized I injured it because I couldn’t lift the weight above my head, not at all. I knew something was wrong. I went to see my shoulder doctor who is an orthopedic surgeon. He evaluated me first by extending my arm out and he would either push on it or have me push on his hand. He could tell you which muscle/tendon is injured.


    An X-ray is the first step to see the shoulder. I saw mine and I do have arthritis which is clearly visible. The rotator cuff injury we couldn’t see. At this visit I was given pain medicine but it only dulled the pain. So I had to get a magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, done. When the doctor reviewed the MRI I was called into his office to go over the MRI and to setup a surgery appointment. They were able to get me in within 10 days.


    Day of surgery I was at the hospital at 8:00 a.m. Three little incisions, three pokes with instruments, two anchors, stitched up, recovery and out the door by noon. Bed rest for the first three days. For an ambulatory person they would be in a sling for three months. ‘chair people the healing takes longer. Just because you get surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff doesn’t mean the pain goes away when they send you home!


    Once inside the shoulder with the scope the doctor was able to see the actual damage to the rotator cuff tendons.

    A funny thing though. When I was home I saw in the mirror this pin sticking out of my back. I thought that was the anchor? About ten days later in the shower it fell off! It was a tab the EKG machine used that a nurse didn't remove after surgery.

    I never experienced pain before during my spinal cord injury but after arthroscopic surgery. My God, (Please forgive me.) I know what severe pain is now. From 1 to 10 on the pain chart I had 10. The pain doesn’t get immediately better but worse because you just now had surgery. I was given vicodin (generic hydrocodone) and it didn’t even touch the pain. I was so miserable! I went back to see my orthopedic surgeon and he couldn’t give me any more narcotics otherwise the DEA would be knocking on our doors. He referred me to a pain management specialist who is licensed by the state to issue narcotics. I got so sick from the vicodin I ended up go to the emergency room! I was never so sick in my entire life! Not even during my initial spinal cord injury.


    After my surgery I did faithfully attended physical therapy three times a week for 90 days. That is what my insurance covered. What I learned in PT is ice and light exercise helps with pain.


    The pain management doctor was great! God bless him! We tried two pain medicines first.

    First week was one medicine that didn’t work. Office visits were weekly until the pain was under control.

    Second week we tried another pain medicine that didn’t work.

    Week three he asked, “Have I ever been on morphine?”

    I said, “Never.”

    He put me on morphine 30mg every eight hours (3x a day). It worked but it didn’t nip the pain all the way.

    Week four we increased the morphine to four times a day and BINGO! It worked! I was pain free, for now. I took it every six hours on the dime! I was on morphine for five more months until one day I missed taking my pain medicine. I went for six hours to twelve hours and no pain. I continued longer to eighteen hours and a day. No pain. Then two days. Three days no pain. The rotator cuff healed.


    Did I have withdrawal symptoms from the morphine? Yes, insomnia.


    For the next year I was easy on my shoulder. Days I was hard on my shoulder I felt a little pain but pain I was able to live with. It wasn’t until two years later I started lifting weights again. I can tell my shoulders are out of balance. The shoulder with surgery is not as strong as the non-injured shoulder.


    I had a friend who told me years ago, “After twenty years pushing a ‘chair you’re going to experience shoulder problems.” He was right in sense of the word but my injury was from a dumb bell and not pushing a manual ‘chair.


    This was my first serious injury or surgery I had post spinal cord injury. Take care of your shoulders if you push a manual 'chair. Keep your weight down and exercise your shoulders to keep them strong for years to come.


    Ti
    Hi ...thank you...I do not use a wheelchair..I am going for pt three times a week. Even my pt says I shouldn't. Be in this much pain. The specialist. Wanted me to go to a pain manager clinic...but I am going for a second. Opinon tomorrow. Tell me something..is pain manager is it to learn to live with the pain? Because. I don't want to live on pain medication I want my life back before the surgery.

  7. #7
    A couple of years ago I had shoulder surgery to fix a SLAP lesion and a bone spur that was digging into the bursa and keeping it inflamed, which meant they had to remove the bursa as well to get to the spur. While the doc was in my shoulder he also fixed a cuff tear that hadn't shown in imaging. My surgery was involved enough that not all of it could be done arthroscopically and they had to open my shoulder as well. My pain was *significant* for quite awhile after surgery. I avoided any pain meds for a couple of days after returning home because of a couple of factors, mainly that I was home alone and didn't want to be dulled due to drugs. Not fun. Any movement hurt; walking....anything. FWIW, I did later get a TENS unit that provided some level of relief. A word of advice....stick with the PT diligently. Your shoulder will be much happier in the long run. You're only 9 weeks out. Give it more time. A PT PhD student that I talked to about my rehab said to not expect my shoulder to feel like "mine" for at least 9-12 months. You should be able to do range-of-motion exercises by now so keep at it with them as much as you can handle. Sometimes I would do do them with the TENS unit buzzing away.

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