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Thread: Professor Jerry Silver to Receive 2003 Ameritec Prize for Paralysis Research

  1. #1
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    Professor Jerry Silver to Receive 2003 Ameritec Prize for Paralysis Research

    News release
    For Immediate Release
    September 3, 2003


    Professor Jerry Silver to Receive
    2003 Ameritec Prize for Paralysis Research


    The Ameritec Foundation announced today that Professor Jerry Silver of Case Western Reserve University has been selected as the recipient of the 2003 Ameritec Prize for a significant accomplishment toward a cure for paralysis. The Prize recognizes Professor Silver's significant contribution in demonstrating that white matter does not always inhibit axonal extension after CNS injury in adult mammals. His elegant experiments in the rodent spinal cord questioned earlier belief by showing that myelinated tracts can be permissive to adult axon growth and that other factors, especially glycosaminoglycans contribute to the failure of axonal regeneration.

    Professor Silver will receive the Prize at a special recognition dinner in New Orleans, Louisiana on November 8, 2003. The Ameritec Foundation is a charitable, non-profit public benefit foundation based in Covina, California. It provides funding for the $40,000 prize. The winner is selected by a Scientific Advisory Board of internationally known medical researchers.

    Dr. Silver's work elucidates the effects of different environments encountered by regenerating axons that permit or inhibit their growth after injury. He has provided elegant demonstrations that growing axons are capable of extending through white matter tracts; thus, degenerating white matter tracts have a greater intrinsic ability to support axonal regeneration than previously thought. This work has broadened the focus of the research community beyond "white matter inhibition" in the search for potential strategies to enhance regeneration. He has shown that other factors, especially the complex molecules called glycosaminoglycans that accumulate at sites of spinal cord injury, contribute importantly to the failure of central nervous system regeneration. Recent demonstrations that degradation of these glycosaminoglycans at an injury site enhances regeneration in the spinal cord have provided experimental support for the importance of these molecules. Dr. Silver's work has greatly increased our understanding of the factors that inhibit axonal growth after injury and provide firm rationales for the development of potential therapeutic strategies aimed at improving regeneration in the central nervous system and ultimately allowing functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Jerry Silver was born in Cleveland, Ohio and earned his undergraduate degree in Biology in 1970 from The Cleveland State University. He completed Ph.D. training in 1974 in the Department of Anatomy at Case Western Reserve University with mentorship from Arthur Hughes, Sc. D. He was awarded the Herbert S. Steuer Memorial Award for Meritorious Original Research in Anatomy. He then moved to The Children's Hospital Medical Center of Harvard University for postdoctoral training with Dr. Richard Sidman in the Depts. of Neuroscience and Neuropathology. Working with Dr. Sidman, he became interested in the role of glial cells in guiding axons during development of the mammalian optic pathway. After two years as a research assistant he served briefly as an Instructor in Ophthalmology and Neuropathology at Harvard Medical School before moving back to Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. After joining the faculty in the Department of Anatomy and Developmental Genetics at CWRU in early 1979 he began his long standing interest in the role of the glial scar and reactive astroglial extracellular matrix during axon regeneration in the brain and spinal cord. Dr. Silver is currently a Professor in the Department of Neurosciences in the School of Medicine at CWRU. His activities include research focused on promoting regeneration in the spinal cord as well as teaching of second year medical students where he serves as chairman of the Phase 2 Nervous System Committee. He is also one of several founding scientists and serves on the SAB of Acorda Therapeutics.


    FOR FUTHER INFORMATION: Contact Bob Yant at 949 673-8474

  2. #2
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    This is a significant contribution.

    I propose an award to the Miami Project for studying Schwann cells for 20 years with no indication of applicability to a human trial.

  3. #3
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    schmeky lets be fair to miami project, its only been 18.5 years not 20.

  4. #4
    Author Topic: テつ* Professor Jerry Silver to Receive 2003 Ameritec Prize for Paralysis Research
    Wise Young

    Administrator posted Sep 04, 2003 09:16 AM テつ*
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Professor Jerry Silver to Receive 2003 Ameritec Prize for Paralysis Research


    The Ameritec Foundation announced today that Professor Jerry Silver of Case Western Reserve University has been selected as the recipient of the 2003 Ameritec Prize for a significant accomplishment toward a cure for paralysis. The Prize recognizes Professor Silver's significant contribution in demonstrating that white matter does not always inhibit axonal extension after CNS injury in adult mammals. His elegant experiments in the rodent spinal cord questioned earlier belief by showing that myelinated tracts can be permissive to adult axon growth and that other factors, especially glycosaminoglycans contribute to the failure of axonal regeneration.

    Professor Silver will receive the Prize at a special recognition dinner in New Orleans, Louisiana on November 8, 2003. The Ameritec Foundation is a charitable, non-profit public benefit foundation based in Covina, California. It provides funding for the $40,000 prize. The winner is selected by a Scientific Advisory Board of internationally known medical researchers.

    Dr. Silver's work elucidates the effects of different environments encountered by regenerating axons that permit or inhibit their growth after injury. He has provided elegant demonstrations that growing axons are capable of extending through white matter tracts; thus, degenerating white matter tracts have a greater intrinsic ability to support axonal regeneration than previously thought. This work has broadened the focus of the research community beyond "white matter inhibition" in the search for potential strategies to enhance regeneration. He has shown that other factors, especially the complex molecules called glycosaminoglycans that accumulate at sites of spinal cord injury, contribute importantly to the failure of central nervous system regeneration. Recent demonstrations that degradation of these glycosaminoglycans at an injury site enhances regeneration in the spinal cord have provided experimental support for the importance of these molecules. Dr. Silver's work has greatly increased our understanding of the factors that inhibit axonal growth after injury and provide firm rationales for the development of potential therapeutic strategies aimed at improving regeneration in the central nervous system and ultimately allowing functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Jerry Silver was born in Cleveland, Ohio and earned his undergraduate degree in Biology in 1970 from The Cleveland State University. He completed Ph.D. training in 1974 in the Department of Anatomy at Case Western Reserve University with mentorship from Arthur Hughes, Sc. D. He was awarded the Herbert S. Steuer Memorial Award for Meritorious Original Research in Anatomy. He then moved to The Children's Hospital Medical Center of Harvard University for postdoctoral training with Dr. Richard Sidman in the Depts. of Neuroscience and Neuropathology. Working with Dr. Sidman, he became interested in the role of glial cells in guiding axons during development of the mammalian optic pathway. After two years as a research assistant he served briefly as an Instructor in Ophthalmology and Neuropathology at Harvard Medical School before moving back to Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. After joining the faculty in the Department of Anatomy and Developmental Genetics at CWRU in early 1979 he began his long standing interest in the role of the glial scar and reactive astroglial extracellular matrix during axon regeneration in the brain and spinal cord. Dr. Silver is currently a Professor in the Department of Neurosciences in the School of Medicine at CWRU. His activities include research focused on promoting regeneration in the spinal cord as well as teaching of second year medical students where he serves as chairman of the Phase 2 Nervous System Committee. He is also one of several founding scientists and serves on the SAB of Acorda Therapeutics.


    FOR FUTHER INFORMATION: Contact Bob Yant at 949 673-8474
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posts: 9472テつ*|テつ*From: New Brunswick, NJ, USAテつ*|テつ*Registered: 07-23-01

  5. #5
    Seneca, thanks for moving my redundant posting of this. I want to say here how well-deserved this award is for Jerry Silver. For a long time, he has championed the concept that there are other inhibitors of axonal growth besides Nogo. He championed the concept that CSPGs are important and much data now support this. In the early 1990's, his was a lonely voice in the wilderness. I am very happy about this decision to give him the Ameritec. Wise.

  6. #6
    Congrats Dr. Silver, good work.

    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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