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Thread: How does a stroke feel like?

  1. #1

    How does a stroke feel like?

    Hello!

    Anyone who had a stroke while awake, how did it feel? I always imagined severe pain in the area. But reading about it brings forth feeling parts of body go numb, tingly, speech problems, and other symptoms. So, how do you know when you have a stroke or are about to experience one?

    Thanks! I hear that getting help quickly is important...but knowing what signs to look for is important.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by otiness View Post
    Hello!

    Anyone who had a stroke while awake, how did it feel? I always imagined severe pain in the area. But reading about it brings forth feeling parts of body go numb, tingly, speech problems, and other symptoms. So, how do you know when you have a stroke or are about to experience one?

    Thanks! I hear that getting help quickly is important...but knowing what signs to look for is important.

    Thanks!
    Raise your both hands in the air, smile, & speak (say a sentence) If you can't do one of these properly you may be having a stroke.

  3. #3
    my dad just had one....was at firestone getting new tires ..said he wasnt feeling quite right, the guy at the counter asked him for info, and when my dad answered him, the guy couldnt understand him, his speech was slurred !..my unlce was with him, took him home, and then to the hospital....ive learned that there is a shot they can give u within 3 hrs of the onset of a stroke, they called it a "clot buster"...which will do what it says, break any clot thats causing the stroke...but has to be within 3hr....
    - Rolling Thru Life -

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    The medicine for clot caused strokes is called tPA. They need to give it within 4 hours so within 3 hours of hitting the ER with tests because they cannot give it to those suffering a bleed.

    Signs of a stroke include slurred speech, confusion, loss of or dimming of sight in one eye, weakness including drooling on one side of the face. Weakness and/or tingling in one side like the face, arm and leg. Normally the face and head areas are first noticed. Do not wait for it to get better go directly to an ER or call 911. DO NOT DRIVE YOURSELF!

    A cerebral vascular accident (CVA) or stroke occurs in the brain pain is normally not noticed right away. A spinal stroke, below the brain stem, hurts like the devil and effects both sides.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  5. #5
    a brain doctor who had a stroke. you might find this interesting,
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyyjU8fzEYU

  6. #6
    Thankas, I was ws wondering about pain.
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  7. #7
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    This is what happened to me. We were driving along ret 40 in NC headed west, I triedto say something to my wife Jean. My words came out slurred and I wasn't able to form words. After a few moments this all went away and I was OK again. Did I have a full blown stroke? Probably not, but something certainly happened.

    Then--- A couple of years ago I was at a meeting of a fishing club, we had just had a sandwich dinner and I started to feel a fluttering in my chest, and I started to sweat, as well as feeling strange. I excused myself from the table and told the guys I was headed home because I didn't feel well. I walked down three flights of stairs, I was not using a chair then, I could walk with some difficulty with a cane. Got into my car and figured I would just drive home. I had forgotten my cell at home, so I couldn't call 911. I was also about 10 minutes from a hospital and as I went down the road the whole world started to close in on me, like I was in a tunnel. I turned towards the hospital and drove there all by myself. I also was able to walk into the hospital and seek help at the main desk. I parked my P?U truck on the front sidewalk. It did turn out that time I was having an atrial fibulation event. They gave me several asprins and then some other meds. Of course I stayed the night n the hospital, they contacted my wife to inform her of what was going on.

    I have always feared being a hypocondriac, probably pretty stupid but that is me.
    Last edited by Bob Sullivan; 03-08-2012 at 04:10 PM. Reason: Failure to directly answer the question. I felt no pain at either event.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Bob, the first sounded like a TIA. A temporary ischemic attack. Lucky people get one before a full blown stroke.

    Could a SCI RN comment more on TIAs versus CVA and even Bell's Palsy? Years back I made sure my father-in-law knew the stroke signs because my mother-in-law was a prime candidate for an ischemic stroke (clot). Getting her to a hospital, checked to make sure it was a clot type stroke and getting tPA would leave her without stroke caused disabilities.

    My Dad was driving home from 18 holes of golf about 10 years ago and suddenly had problems breathing. No pain either. Thankfully the hospital was straight down the road from the course. He made the ER parking lot and barely made it out of the car. A nurse going in to work saw him and ran over to help him slide slowly down to sit leaning against the car. She ran in and was back in like 3 minutes with a doctor, 2 techs and a stretcher. The heart attack he thought he was having was his first asthma attack. He had most of the symptoms of a heart attack except pain.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  9. #9
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    Sue, you might find this an interesting story, it is a sort of synopsis of my life after the bends (Caissons disease)

    When I was 23 that is almost 50 years ago now I got the bends using helium and oxygen as a breathing medium for diving into extreme depths. I got what is called the bends, and was treated at the naval facilities in Toulon France. since this was my way of making a living I continued to dive when I came home to the US. and for the next almost 11 years I had no real effects from this experience.
    Then in 1973 while putting in a pipeline across a river in 60 feet of water at low tide, and using conventional hard hat diving gear, I was drawn up to the surface because a ship was transiting up this river. I was aware that I was on the surface, and while taking the helmet off I saw the ship, this I remember. From there on everything is very sketchy. And I was told I dressed myself and left the vessel I was on climbed a ladder and walked part way across a bridge, I then fell or sat down on this bridge, I guess someone called an ambulance because the next thing I remember I was upchucking all over a nurse in a hospital. I know they had been asking me questions, but I have no clue what I gave for answers.

    Someone had informed my wife I was at the hospital. Who? No clue! My next door neighbor was there and several hours had passed, but I have no memory of that time.

    Today, I have spent my life working at a plethora of things, and retired at 65. I tried to sue and got less than nowhere, I could not tell truthfully what happened, and the Marine Chapter of the Workman’s Comp at that time was antiquated according to my lawyer. So I collected my $27,000 and went on my way. All the doctors I have spoken with have little or nothing to say about this. I have been tested, prodded, wired up, had pins stuck in me etc. ect. all I can find out is I insulted my brain.

    My legs are full of pins and needles, pain in my knees and ankles. My back is in an almost constant spasm, just cramping to various degrees. For years my wife had to sleep in a different bed than I because of my leg jerking all over the place. I will not discuss the sensitivity of my lower body waist down, but to say it is nearly nonexistent. In the past few years the whole situation has deteriorated and I became more unsteady. I cannot walk anywhere if it is totally dark, I have to see my legs and feet.

    Lately, my legs have just failed me and I have fallen about a dozen times in less than a week. About three years ago I bought a Power Wheel Chair so I could go for walks, or I would not have left the confines of my house. Now I use a chair indoors and my leg spasms have for the most part seemed to stop or are at least are far less violent.

    My hands are now becoming affected as well, the little fingers on each side are becoming shriveled and without feeling.

    I am wondering if there are any other guys who have gotten this malady, and how did they handle it?

    I love to hunt and fish but this has pretty much been foregone to me lately. I intend to do more this summer if I can figure out how to make myself an all terrain chair. I will be looking towards some kind of communication.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Bob, I take it there were no MRIs back in '73? Sounds like a huge non-traumatic concussion. I smacked my chin on the ice while sliding on one of those circular sled things about the same year. I remember standing up and my chin wasn't bleeding but my stomach didn't feel very good. It took years before I remembered walking the block home and going to my room to take a nap. I appearently was ok a few hours later for dinner but now I know I probably had a concussion.
    I hear you on the Marine Workman's Comp. It hadn't improved as of the mid-80s when a cousin was smacked by one of those huge hooks. He rehabbed himself and his life sounds much like yours just maybe a few years younger. If you haven't seen a neurologist in several years it might be time to go back. You never know what they might be able to help with now.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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