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Thread: Great results from our Chondroitinase study

  1. #1
    Senior Member Duran's Avatar
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    Great results from our Chondroitinase study

    A Spinal Research project which is developing the enzyme chondroitinase for use in clinical trials to repair the injured spinal cord is reporting some excellent results.
    Chondroitinase is a bacterial enzyme which removes these inhibitory molecules and also appears to reactivate the ability of intact nerve fibres to sprout new growths (‘plasticity’), enabling them to make new connections and take over the functions of the damaged nerve cells; it has also been shown to promote nerve cell survival. These multiple properties of the enzyme make it a very promising candidate for the treatment of human SCI.
    Our project based at the University of Cambridge under the supervision of Dr Liz Muir has the aim of developing a form of deliverable chondroitinase which is safe and effective for use in clinical trials with injured patients.
    In a Spinal Research-funded collaboration with Dr Liz Bradbury (University College London) the team have tested the delivery of the enzyme via viral vectors (particular types of controlled viruses) and they have shown that viral delivery of the gene that creates the enzyme has resulted in the most extensive removal of inhibitory molecules around the site of SCI seen to date.
    The team are now collaborating with numerous laboratories around the world to futher develop this therapy with promising results.
    http://www.spinal-research.org/resea...itinase-study/
    2016

  2. #2
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    Very encouraging. Let us see how soon clinical trials are there.

  3. #3
    There are two inconsistencies in this article. And the way it is worded suggests use in acute.

  4. #4
    It looks pretty legit to me....

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastiang View Post
    There are two inconsistencies in this article. And the way it is worded suggests use in acute.
    It's very much chronic. The rats used at Liz Bradbury's lab are 6-month post-injury using a chronic contusion model.

  6. #6
    "In addition, when the virus is injected into the site of injury, it prevents much of the secondary tissue damage that normally ensues, resulting in the sparing of many nerve cells, dramatically improved nerve function, and significant improvements in behavioural function."

    Fly, this is the language that suggested to me acute and not chronic because the concern of secondary damage is an acute concern

  7. #7
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    Hope they meet acorda soon for further necessary steps to bring chase into trials like Jerry. Fly any updates from them to you?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    It's very much chronic. The rats used at Liz Bradbury's lab are 6-month post-injury using a chronic contusion model.
    I agree

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    It's very much chronic. The rats used at Liz Bradbury's lab are 6-month post-injury using a chronic contusion model.
    The rats used at Dr. Silver's lab were 1 year chronic's also.

  10. #10
    when was this article published? is this new?

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