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Thread: Help Needed with Study into Proposed Reversal of Spinal Cord Injuries

  1. #11
    No AKF, I saw that post. It's been over 3 months since that was posted and we haven't heard anything new. I was looking for some input from Dr. Young on this. No doubt we'll hear from him when he is able to respond.

  2. #12
    Vicki

    This paper was written for secondary schoool level science in plants. The reason it only mentions how it fits with human and animal physiology briefly is that the paper was not intended for use with these subjects and was restricted due to wordcount and subject by The National Curriculum Authorities here in the UK.

    As for my main paper and more detailed information it forms my book titled The Gravity Of Life,Yet to be published and always under construction.

    Andrew

    "Go With The Flow"

  3. #13
    I'm sorry, I can't help but think that this is not the long-term answer. Believe me, I'm open to all therapies, but ...

  4. #14
    Senior Member X-racer...'s Avatar
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    Seems to me this is a duplicate/repost is it not ????

    LIVE IT UP AND LIVE IT LARGE!!!!

  5. #15
    Wise, could you please comment on this pub med article?



    : Biomed Tech (Berl). 2001 May;46(5):124-8. Related Articles, Links


    [Hemodynamics of the lower extremity with pneumatic foot compression. Effect on leg position]

    [Article in German]

    Pitto RP, Hamer H, Kuhle JW, Radespiel-Troger M, Pietsch M.

    Orthopadische Klinik mit Poliklinik Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg Waldkrankenhaus, Rathsbergerstrasse 57 D-91054, Erlangen, Deutschland. pitto@ortho.med.uni-erlangen.de

    External pneumatic compression of the foot is being used more and more to increase the venous blood flow in the lower limbs and thus reduce the risk of postoperative deep venous thrombosis. We have investigated the efficacy of the foot pump pneumatic compression device (A-V Impulse, Novamedix, Andover, England) in 10 healthy subjects and in 10 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. The velocity of venous blood flow in the common femoral artery was measured in the horizontal, Trendelenburg (head-down, foot-up) and reverse Trendelenburg (head-up and foot-down) positions using a duplex ultrasound unit (Sonoline Elegra, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with a 5 MHz linear array probe. Application of the foot pump produced an increase in venous blood flow velocity in all healthy subjects and in all patients. In healthy subjects the mean increase in the horizontal position was 31.18% (SD = 15.86%), and in the Trendelenburg position 20.72 (SD = 15.69%) (right limb). In the reverse Trendelenburg position, the foot pump produced a mean increase of 94.08% (SD = 55.00%). The difference is statistically significant (p < 0.005). In patients with a total hip arthroplasty, the mean increase in the horizontal position was 28.67% (SD = 9.95%), and in the Trendelenburg position 20.34% (SD = 17.85%) (operated limb). In the reverse Trendelenburg, the foot pump produced a mean increase of 91.55% (SD = 42.38%). The difference is statistically significant (p < 0.005). There was no noteworthy difference in results between the controls and patients. Pneumatic compression devices designed to reduce venous stasis are effective in decreasing the rate of deep venous thrombosis after surgery on the lower limb. The results of the present study show that the efficiency of the foot pump in increasing venous return is improved by adopting the reverse Trendelenburg position. This may increase its thromboprophylactic effect.

    PMID: 11413908 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



    "Go With The Flow"

  6. #16
    BOWEL FUNCTION

    I have been using and testing a simple exercise, which might help you guys with bowel movements.

    Since my theory relates to hydraulic forces in the body, which are dependent on evaporation and therefore breathing out, rather than breathing in is of significant importance.

    I decided to conduct a simple experiment on myself first. The idea was that a long slow exhale from the lungs,followed by holding the breath for 8 seconds or more, when lungs are fully evacuated, would assist bowel movement and speed up the whole process.Repeating this breathing exercise, intermittently several times in succession has proved to be effective even with constipation.

    Having spoken with a few friends, the normal reaction for A-B people with breathing, during bowel movements is to hold the breath, rather than breathing out.

    This method should not require A-B neurological function and therefore may prove useful to people with spinal cord injuries.

    It does work very effectively for A-B people, having been tested on many occasions with myself and others.

    It could prove interesting to see if this method could help people with spinal cord injuries to evacuate their bowels more effectively.

    Please let myself and the group know if you decide to try this method.

    Andrew

    "Go With The Flow"

  7. #17
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
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    Andrew, you astound me with your lack of understanding of the subject matter you are trying to 'cure' with your 'theories'. How can you cure something that you have no idea what the symptoms are? To start, SCI takes away abdominal muscle function, of which a great deal of 'pushing' effect is accomplished during bowel movement. Additionally SCI drasticly reduces peristalsis (uh oh, big word Andrew, better get that biology book you got from the second hand store out). Dont hold your breath for another 'breakthough discovery' that you can credit to yourself, or is it hold your breath?

  8. #18
    Originally posted by Andrew K Fletcher:

    _BOWEL FUNCTION_

    It does work very effectively for A-B people, having been tested on many occasions with myself and others.

    Andrew

    "Go With The Flow"
    It works for you ? Huh, I guess you're not full of sh*t afterall AKF!

  9. #19
    Andy, You also astound me with your inability to observe results posted by people who are actually trying this therapy and benefiting from it.

    All I have done with this post is to ask if anyone would give the breathing exercise a try. It may help, or it may not work. It is very easy to test it.

    Andrew

  10. #20
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
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    Andrew, subjective findings such as "I sweat more" (It is summer), "My hair is greasier" (Did you bathe lately?) "My nails are better" (Any dietary change?) "My neuropathic pain is worse" (Focusing on it again are we?) Do not in any way tell me that your ideas are curing SCI as claimed. I have yet to see anyone reporting jumping out of their chairs after trying your ideas. It didnt work with the ALS folks you tried to peddle your theories on, why would it work here? Do you yourself know that it works? Although maybe if we believe enough that it is helping it just might do something, eh? I have some trinkets I can mail out to some of your prospective participants that are guaranteed to cure SCI as well to help the 'cure' along. Actually, no, I wouldn't do that, I am not that cruel. This latest idea of yours strikes me as of the same ilk of your inclined bed, or did you just post this to resurrect another of your threads?

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