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Thread: Physicians in wheelchairs

  1. #41

    medical school after SCI

    One more resource...

    I went to medical school 8 years after a C6 motor complete injury. No assistant, used a stand-up chair and tenodesis splints in anatomy, chair for OR. Did basic exams - heart/lung/abdomen etc from a chair. Excused from performing tasks requiring strength/dexterity/standing; same for procedures; had to be able to "understand and direct the methodology involved" in all circumstances, as per AAP guidelines. Had same clinical load as others, did all the calls. Have practiced 20 years. Boarded in PMR and SCI Medicine.

    Not a career for the faint of heart, but very rewarding. Please contact me as needed for a letter of support for med school admission, I have sent one on behalf of a number of students.

    Ed Nieshoff MD
    ecnieshoff@gmail.com
    Ed from Detroit

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by enieshoff View Post
    One more resource...

    I went to medical school 8 years after a C6 motor complete injury. No assistant, used a stand-up chair and tenodesis splints in anatomy, chair for OR. Did basic exams - heart/lung/abdomen etc from a chair. Excused from performing tasks requiring strength/dexterity/standing; same for procedures; had to be able to "understand and direct the methodology involved" in all circumstances, as per AAP guidelines. Had same clinical load as others, did all the calls. Have practiced 20 years. Boarded in PMR and SCI Medicine.

    Not a career for the faint of heart, but very rewarding. Please contact me as needed for a letter of support for med school admission, I have sent one on behalf of a number of students.

    Ed Nieshoff MD
    ecnieshoff@gmail.com
    Did you do 30 hour shifts sitting in your chair every 2 days?

  3. #43
    Senior Member Van Quad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Here are some additional resources for physicians with disabilities, or those who have a disability and are contemplating a career in medicine:



    For Canadians:

    http://www.capd.ca/


    (KLD)
    Thanks for the resource. It's one I'd never heard of.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Cripply View Post
    Did you do 30 hour shifts sitting in your chair every 2 days?
    No overnight call since internship/residency, but yes, I did some long shifts - usually a little under 30 hours - in at 7:00am first day, out at noon next day. Call was usually every 4 in my internship, less in residency. Sometimes a little sleep, if lucky. Standard call room/mattress etc. Never had a skin issue. In retrospect, not sure how I did it.
    Ed from Detroit

  5. #45
    Senior Member fishin'guy's Avatar
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    The damn doc that put me in this chair had the balls to come into the room one day, and say, "Did you hear about the guy hit by car, he was a docotor here in the spine unit. Geez I went to see him in rehab, gawd the things he's got to learn to do, can you imagine?"
    SHIT YESS I CAN IMAGINE!! I just wheeled around and left, waht a douche bag. He needs to retire.

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by enieshoff View Post
    No overnight call since internship/residency, but yes, I did some long shifts - usually a little under 30 hours - in at 7:00am first day, out at noon next day. Call was usually every 4 in my internship, less in residency. Sometimes a little sleep, if lucky. Standard call room/mattress etc. Never had a skin issue. In retrospect, not sure how I did it.
    Not sure how I did it either...I did many many 30 hour shifts just fresh out of the accident...And my boss paged me to cross snowy avenue so I could be insulted...then back to work...21 days in a row without a day off...It was ridiculous. But I did not quit.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by fishin'guy View Post
    The damn doc that put me in this chair had the balls to come into the room one day, and say, "Did you hear about the guy hit by car, he was a docotor here in the spine unit. Geez I went to see him in rehab, gawd the things he's got to learn to do, can you imagine?"
    SHIT YESS I CAN IMAGINE!! I just wheeled around and left, waht a douche bag. He needs to retire.
    How insensitive!! Was he a surgeon? I find that surgeon can be the most insensitive or the mostempathic, no in between...

  8. #48
    College project could put [paralyzed] surgeon back on the job

    From the middle of the article:

    Garrett Cuppels, 37, also is a person who naturally gravitates toward helping people. In 2000, Cuppels risked his life and jumped into a river to save a suicidal man who jumped off the East Falls Bridge in Philadelphia. Cuppels wasn't able to save the man, but his actions were featured on NBC's "Dateline" and "The Oprah Winfrey Show."

    Cuppels went on to become an orthopedic surgeon in Florida. In early 2010, his career was stopped when he fell from a balcony, injuring his spine and leaving him unable to use his legs. Even though he can use his arms, he can no longer operate because he can't stand and move in the operating room.

    That's where Olson and his biomedical engineering friends come in. Earlier this school year, Olson and his team members were assigned to do a senior project that was meant to help a quadriplegic client who lived in Madison. Their job was to design a universal stylus that would allow the client to use his mouth to work keypads in banks and stores and the like. But as they got started, "he actually solved his own problem. He found a stylus that worked," Olson said.

  9. #49
    My neurologist, Dr. Jonathan Strayer, was a quad. That was back in 1993 at TIRR, and he used hand crutches and a wheelchair. He went to Australia and now I think he is in Ohio.
    Incomplete T-12/L-1

  10. #50
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    Timm Zimmermann, MD, Mt. Vernon, WA. Timm is no longer with us. He was about a T4. He was also a tremendous friend, and a doctor's doctor. The best I have ever known. Glad to see so many positive replies to your question, and I wish you the best in your efforts.
    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

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