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Thread: Money

  1. #1
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Money

    Yesterday, at a meeting of advocates for PWD, I was told that the paper currency of Switzerland had Braille impressions and other characteristics to facilitate its use by people with vision impairments or blindness.

    Two questions:

    Anybody know this to be true?

    WHY the HELL isn't this the case in ALL countries, most especially the USD???

    In our country, blind people must accept the word of others as to the denomination of the bills in a transaction.

    A blind man operated the canteen in the West Virginia State Capitol. If you told him you gave him a $10, he gave you change for a $10. I always liked that trust, but I like better the idea that he could know without being told.

    THOUGHTS?
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

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  2. #2
    The Canadian currency tactile feature is a feature on the current "Canadian Journey" series of Canadian banknotes. The feature indicates the banknote denomination in the upper right corner of the face side of the bill using a series of raised dots. It was suggested by Bruno Thériault, an administrator for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, and designed by Dr. Susan Lederman, a professor of Psychology at Queen's University.[1]
    Although similar in appearance to Braille, it differs because standard Braille was deemed too sensitive. The currency denomination must be recognized easily, thus the banknotes use full Braille blocks (or cells) of 6 dots. The $5 bill has one cell, with the $10, $20, and $50 denominations each having one more cell than previous. The $100 bill has two cells arranged such that there is a space of two empty cells between them.
    A very similar system of tactile raised dots is now being implemented in a new series of notes for the Costa Rican colón.

  3. #3
    I've wondered about this too. The US isn't terribly friendly to those with vision impairments. That demographic has similar issues w/ widespread ADA compliance as we do. Electronic (debit/credit) payments in public present similar barriers as well, though keypads for debit transactions often have braille... but if you can't read the screen...

    Good question.

  4. #4
    Senior Member brucec's Avatar
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    seems like the raised dots would get flattened kinda quick?
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    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
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    It is an interesting point. Access to money. FO I have also wondered how and why states often trained persons with visual impairments for just the jobs you describe, operating news stands and more. We had folks who were blind working those type jobs here in VA as well.


    The National Federation for the Blind ( NFB) is a strong advocacy organization, I would think they have a position on this. One thing that occurs to me is that Braille literacy never real high and has declined significantly. Electronic readers and technology have logically taken over so it seems that if there were a way to make currency "accessible to all it might involve technology. ( the only problem with that it assumes all blind persons would have the money for usually expensive technology) Interesting subject...

    Braille literacy:
    "In 1960, 50% of legally blind, school-age children were able to read Braille in the U.S.[7][8] According to the 2007 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind, there are approximately 57,696 legally blind children in the U.S. Out of those school-age children, only 10% use Braille as their primary reading medium.[9]"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braille

  6. #6
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChesBay View Post
    It is an interesting point. Access to money. FO I have also wondered how and why states often trained persons with visual impairments for just the jobs you describe, operating news stands and more. We had folks who were blind working those type jobs here in VA as well.


    The National Federation for the Blind ( NFB) is a strong advocacy organization, I would think they have a position on this. One thing that occurs to me is that Braille literacy never real high and has declined significantly. Electronic readers and technology have logically taken over so it seems that if there were a way to make currency "accessible to all it might involve technology. ( the only problem with that it assumes all blind persons would have the money for usually expensive technology) Interesting subject...

    Braille literacy:
    "In 1960, 50% of legally blind, school-age children were able to read Braille in the U.S.[7][8] According to the 2007 Annual Report from the American Printing House for the Blind, there are approximately 57,696 legally blind children in the U.S. Out of those school-age children, only 10% use Braille as their primary reading medium.[9]"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braille
    Addressing just the question of a low rate of Braille literacy as it pertains to the use of money, I don't think it presents that big of a challenge. One would only have to learn five "words." Bet even an aging fool could manage that task rather quickly. There's a built in incentive to become proficient.
    Foolish

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  7. #7
    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foolish Old View Post
    Addressing just the question of a low rate of Braille literacy as it pertains to the use of money, I don't think it presents that big of a challenge. One would only have to learn five "words." Bet even an aging fool could manage that task rather quickly. There's a built in incentive to become proficient.
    Good point FO, "keep it simple" and probably many can benefit. My vision is definitely not improving with age.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ChesBay's Avatar
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    Not that NFB is the last word spokesperson organization for the blind but apparently in past actions they have been opposed to changes making tactile currency. came across this:

    http://www.nfb.org/images/nfb/public...2/bm070202.htm

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    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucec View Post
    seems like the raised dots would get flattened kinda quick?
    They don't .. they're structured along the top of where foil is located making the paper bill a little 'sturdier' there.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChesBay View Post
    Not that NFB is the last word spokesperson organization for the blind but apparently in past actions they have been opposed to changes making tactile currency. came across this:

    http://www.nfb.org/images/nfb/public...2/bm070202.htm
    Very interesting. Seems that money and politics are always the bottom line of every issue, even when money itself is the issue. Sorry to learn that there's a division of opinion within the community of advocates. Good practical arguments on both sides, but I suspect that this controversy also includes elements of a turf war.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

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