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Thread: paralel tests, Cethrin

  1. #1
    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    paralel tests, Cethrin

    Dear Dr. Young,

    Do you know any details about Bioaxon's Cethrin? What is it anyway, what can it do on what type of SCI people?
    It is said it effect Rho signalling. What is it?

    Isn't it just a market trick?
    What about proneuron's clinical trials? I heard similar trials are being made in Australia.

    If you posted any answers of of these questions just lemme know the link.
    Thanks in advance
    Bubo

  2. #2
    Copied this over from the Acute forum.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Clinical trials using Cethrin are to begin this year.

    Dr. Young:
    Bioaxone. Lisa McKerracher is planning a clinical trial to assess recombinant C3, cethrin, or the best version of rho inhibitors that they are now testing in animals.
    For more on Cethrin, see the links below.

    http://carecure.org/forum/showpost.php?p=78366

    http://carecure.org/forum/showpost.php?p=89018

    For the latest about Proneuron, click on the following link.

    http://carecure.org/forum/showpost.php?p=89018

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    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    As far as I see Cethrin will be (if will be) usable only for fresh injuries of the Spinal cord. Am I seeing wrong that it won't help at all on people after 1-2-3 years of the injury?

    I also bet this drug will be extremely expensive however not as effective as its price. And many people in East Europe and in the developing countries won't be able to afford it. Nor the health systems of developing economies....

  5. #5
    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    You see, the problem is not only finding a cure but if partial or full cure will be available (which is suspected will be a combination of complex methods) how will these methods/cures reach people who has no chance to pay for expensive surgeries and drugs. Will they stay paralysed because of that? Will only C. Reeve and other people walk ?
    That is a problem someone must face.
    Cure means nothing if people can not afford it.
    Bubo

  6. #6
    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    > expensive surgeries and drugs. Will they stay >paralysed because of that? Will only C. Reeve >and other people walk ?

    I meant here:
    Will only C. Reeve and other rich people walk ?

    Bubo

  7. #7
    Bubo, I am not sure what you are basing your conclusions on.
    Do you know any details about Bioaxon's Cethrin? What is it anyway, what can it do on what type of SCI people? It is said it effect Rho signalling. What is it? Isn't it just a market trick?
    • It is not a market trick. Cethrin and rho inhibitors are a legitimate and important new family of therapies aimed at blocking rho, the intracellular messenger believed to mediate the inhibitory effects of the Nogo receptor. Several studies have been published by Lisa McKerracher who has been doing all these studies of Cethrin and other rho inhibitors.

    What about proneuron's clinical trials? I heard similar trials are being made in Australia.
    • Proneuron's trials involved activated macrophages. Australia's trials involve autologous olfactory ensheathing glia isolated from the nasal mucosa.

    As far as I see Cethrin will be (if will be) usable only for fresh injuries of the Spinal cord. Am I seeing wrong that it won't help at all on people after 1-2-3 years of the injury?
    • On what do you base these conclusions? I have not seen any information that suggest that Cethrin's use would have to be limited to the acute phase after spinal cord injury. While it is true that most of the studies that have been carried out to date have involved acute spinal cord injury, I don't know that there are any studies indicating that it does not work on chronic spinal cord injury.

    I also bet this drug will be extremely expensive however not as effective as its price. And many people in East Europe and in the developing countries won't be able to afford it. Nor the health systems of developing economies....
    • It is likely that any new drug will be expensive. It costs money to do research and the costs are higher when the market is small, like spinal cord injury. I am frequently asked about the cost of therapies and people express their concern that people in third world countries would not have access to the new therapies. For example, I hear this frequently in India and China. My answer to them is that if the treatment is developed in the country, then it will be affordable.

    Incidentally, as soon as a rho inhibitor is shown to be effective to stimulating regeneration, there will be many other drugs besides Cethrin that will be effective in inhibiting rho. The attractive aspect of rho inhibitors is strong likelihood that it may be facilitate brain and peripheral nerve regeneration as well, thus markedly increasing the market size.

    Wise.

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    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Wise Young:

    Bubo, I am not sure what you are basing your conclusions on.

    My basis is that for example this 7 year old boy's parents must have collected the money to buy a breathing machine to get the boy home and not to stay in hospital forever. The machine and accessories costed over 40000 USD and the health system paid only part of it.

    If any extremely expensive therapies will be effective, I am not sure that families will afford it even in Hungary which is not third world, we will be full member of the European Union from next May... However the health system is in ruins. Also introducing a new drug here takes years so if Cethrin will be really effective this boy must travel abroad and pay the high fee of foreign hospitals to get the drug.

    help at all on people after 1-2-3 years of the injury?
    • On what do you base these conclusions? I have not seen any information that suggest that Cethrin's use would have to be limited to the acute phase after spinal cord injury. While it

    I read it on a webpage, sorry I can not remember on which one. Maybe it was misunderstanding. That is why this forum is good. To make thing s clear.


    Incidentally, as soon as a rho inhibitor is shown to be effective to stimulating regeneration, there will be many other drugs besides Cethrin that will be effective in inhibiting rho.


    When do you expect this?

    Thank you
    Bubo

  9. #9
    Bubo,

    There are many children with high cervical spinal cord injuries around the world. In most "third-world" countries, these children are allowed to die. In fact, when I visit places like India, China, Brazil, and other countries, I see very few or no patients on respirators. The first goal of treating children on respirators is to try to get them off the respirator. As I pointed out in the article that I wrote for the Acute SCI Forum, this is something that can be done through routes other than regeneration. This does not require a "cure" and can be done with current technology. Over half of the children who start on respirators can be weaned off the respirator and many children who are on respirators can live productive lives (see abstract). There are some treatments, such as theophylline (see topic in Clinical Trial Forum), a very inexpensive drug, that will help wean people off of respirators. His parents should be investigating these options as well.

    Wise.

  10. #10
    Senior Member dr_bubo's Avatar
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    http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=23188. There are some treatments, such as theophylline (see http://carecure.org/forum/showthread.php?t=39745 a very inexpensive drug, that will help wean people off of respirators. His parents should be investigating these options as well.


    this option is interesting, however no one can tell who would pay the trip of this boy and his parents to the USA and pay all necessary costs for the trial. All trials are made in highly developed countries (which is understandable) however ity will not help at all in these cases.

    I might seem "advocatus diaboli" however I just wanna point out some aspects of defectiveness in th whole SCI cure/trial system...

    I think one good step would be a system which would force all countries' health system to introduce any method tested and approved at once in those countries. For example, if this Cethrin will be successful, it might be available in USA or England but in Hungary for example we should wait 3-5 years. (I do not know why, same humans live here as in UK or USA)
    But this is how the system works. So this boy should either travel to USA to get Cetrhin treatment or wait years till the drug will be legal and available in Hungary.

    I hope I made my worries and points clear
    Bubo

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