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Thread: More on Airlines' Discrimination of PWD

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by wheeliecoach View Post
    So...if they can refuse boarding to us because we "may not be able to get off the plane" without assistance in the event of an emergency...then how could they let those elderly people travel? They move slower than I would ever...and that is with me scooting on the ground if need be. We are not second class citizens because we have a disability...but we sure are treated that way aren't we?
    they cannot refuse due to not being able to get off plane. ACAA. know your rights and carry them.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by wtf View Post
    Calm down Cass, geez it was a joke, try laughing sometime. Of course I appreciate the pilots and flight attendents, they've all been great to me, I've had nothing but good experiences when I've flown.
    sorry, wtf. the article made me mad it was bad reporting. sorry.

  3. #13
    Senior Member wtf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cass View Post
    sorry, wtf. the article made me mad it was bad reporting. sorry.
    No worries, Cass. That article is infuriating. I've never had a problem boarding a plane but with all these recent incidences of the flight crew denying disabled passengers, it has me worried I could be denied a seat.

  4. #14
    ty, wtf. you have a point. everybody should carry a copy of the ACAA if in U.S. i, too, have not had a prob., here or overseas. thx for understanding my outburst i just know so many pilots/crew and it hurts if it even looks like they take their jobs lightly. thx, wtf.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by cass View Post
    sorry, wtf. the article made me mad it was bad reporting. sorry.

    Cass,

    You know far more about this than I do. I thought it was good reporting. Can you help me understand how it was wrong so I can contact the reporter? We all benefit when the media gets "us" right.

    Thanks
    My blog: Living Life at Butt Level

    Ignite Phoenix #9 - Wheelchairs and Wisdom: Living Life at Butt Level

    "I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that which comes to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which comes to me as blossom, goes on as fruit."

    Dawna Markova Author of Open Mind.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ghost6871 View Post
    Instead, you get dragged down the aisle on the Hannibal Lector dolly and then pray you don't witness your chair fall out of the back of the plane.
    I hate those aisle chairs, so my husband just picks me up and carries me on board. He does it so quickly no one has time to stop him. We've never been given any flack.

    We were flying to South America once and checked my chair all the way through. When we landed in Miami I used an airport chair to go to our connecting flight. As we were going through the terminal our small son said, "Look, Mom. That man is riding in your chair!" Sure enough!! The airline had taken my chair out of baggage and put some guy in it. I would have landed in South America with no chair if my son hadn't been so observant.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by 47+years View Post
    When we landed in Miami I used an airport chair to go to our connecting flight. As we were going through the terminal our small son said, "Look, Mom. That man is riding in your chair!" Sure enough!! The airline had taken my chair out of baggage and put some guy in it. I would have landed in South America with no chair if my son hadn't been so observant.
    WOW! what a story! that is crazy..there should be a claim check ..so much for that! high five the son!
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

  8. #18
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    I always gate check my chair. I get out of my chair at the aircraft door, and I refuse to leave the aircraft seat until my chair has appeared at the aircraft door. My rational is that because of the fused hips, I cannot use a regular wheelchair. All true. Cannot hurt to ask for a gate check. I have not had any problems because of it, and my wife did it routinely after seeing my example.

    The only time this caused a problem was on a flight from Mumbai to Los Angeles with a stop in Taipei for refueling and a security check before the last leg to LA. All the passengers were told to leave the aircraft. I said bring my chair, and I am off, but I cannot sit in a regular wheelchair. A series of increasing important looking men came to talk to me and explain this was a US security regulation, but I never left the plane and my wife who is also in a chair said "if he is not going I am not going." We stayed.

    I think it is a great idea to carry a copy of the regulations. My guess is if the pilot wants you off, your off. They don't call them captain for nothing. But knowing your rights is always a good , it may get you some compensation, and it may result in a policy change so others in the future don't endure the pain.

    Securing your own chair is a bad, bad, bad idea. Cass's description of the problems was right on.
    T4 complete, 150 ft fall, 1966. Completely fused hips, partially fused knees and spine, heterotopic ossification. Unsuccessful DREZ surgery about 1990. Successful bladder augmentation using small intestine about 1992. Normal SCI IC UTI problems culminating in a hospital stay in 2001. No antibiotics or doctor visits for UTI since 2001: d-mannose. Your mileage may vary.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by 47+years View Post
    We were flying to South America once and checked my chair all the way through. When we landed in Miami I used an airport chair to go to our connecting flight. As we were going through the terminal our small son said, "Look, Mom. That man is riding in your chair!" Sure enough!! The airline had taken my chair out of baggage and put some guy in it. I would have landed in South America with no chair if my son hadn't been so observant.
    Something similar happened to us flying to Puerto Rico from Miami to catch a cruise. Someone had taken my mother's manual chair (a Quickie 2) and put someone who needed an airport chair in it. When we went to get off the plane, no wheelchair! My dad took off running and finally caught the people using the chair as they were getting into a cab at the curb. We don't know if they were planning to take it with them. Fortunately this was before 9/11, so he was eventually able to get back through security with the wheelchair and to our plane for my mother.

    After that, our standard procedure when disembarking from a plane was to have my father immediately get off the plane, snag our wheelchair as soon as it was brought up from the hold, either on the tarmac or in the jetway, and stay there and guard it. I stayed with my mother on the plane, and helped with getting her onto the aisle chair. You have to be vigilent!

    Also be sure to ask the cabin attendant to make double check that the wheelchair actually made it on-board in the hold when gate checking it. Twice we have seen the plane start to pull out and saw our wheelchair still sitting on the tarmac!

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 01-23-2012 at 08:05 PM.

  10. #20
    I go through hassles with American Eagle every time I fly to San Juan to see my pain management doctor and/or physiatrist, which lately has been once a month. It's usually a battle with the flight attendants who insist I sit in the window seat, even though it takes three people just to help me get from the aisle chair into the aisle seat. The rationale given for this ''policy'', the enforcement of which is clearly open to the whims of whoever is working that day, is that my AB spouse can begin to help me more quickly if he is sitting in the aisle seat and doesn't have to step over me to get out of his seat. Not one of them will even consider the fact that while seating him on the aisle will save him a few seconds time in exiting his seat, there's no way in hell he can, on his own, drag me from the window seat over the aisle seat and into the aisle, let alone do it more quickly than if I am seated on the aisle.

    I've come close to being kicked off the flight for refusing to move to the window seat, but haven't yet had that happen. But it's a fight on at least one leg of the trip every time I fly. On one occasion I was almost asked to leave the flight because I was unable to move to the window seat under my own power. The battles are always more heated when they occur on the flight home from San Juan because 75 percent of the time the idiot ground crew waits until all the other passengers are on board before assisting me. When that occurs, not only am I subjected to having 54 people watch as I go through the undignified and often painful transfer into my seat, but takeoff is delayed while the arguments about where I'm required to sit are worked out. I'm certain at times that the only reason I haven't been kicked off is that the crew doesn't want to face the wrath of the other passengers who would have to wait in the unventilated plane as it bakes under the tropical sun while the ground crew, lift and aisle chair are called back to haul my crippled, argumentative ass off the plane.

    I'm all for what the folks in the article are trying to accomplish and will happily write letters and make calls to my member of Congress to help advance the cause. But I wish someone could convince them to work with an existing national disability rights group instead of starting up a new one. Getting the ACAA amended to include a private cause of action provision is already a lot to take on -- trying to start a new organization is just going to divert already scarce resources away from the campaign and will likely kick off turf wars. Coalition building around a single issue is hard enough as it is without having a brand new group of folks show up on the scene and try to ''lead'' disability rights advocates who have decades of experience and existing relationships with members of Congress like Sen. Tom Harkin.
    It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

    ~Julius Caesar


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