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Thread: Ramp Surface

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf View Post
    Plywood will get _extremely_ slippery when wet, and must be coated with something non-slip.
    Try an internet search for non-slip paint.
    As you say, you could simply mix some sand into paint. A boating shop might have ideas about quantity of sand, and/or have something already mixed.
    A quick solution, although not very pretty, is to nail asphalt shingles on the ramp - that's what I did, 'cause I had a pile of the stuff left over.
    Yeah, once lived where the had that on the stairs. Worked but kept shedding the little granules.

    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    a roll of wire mesh can be nailed down over wood. treated lumber shouldn't get moldy if treated properly. other choice would be to purchase an aluminum ramp.
    Hmm, hadn't thought of wire mesh for traction, but that make sense. Actually I hadn't even considered PT for the surface, most of the decks and stuff I've done in the past had cedar decking and just used PT for the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by TomRL View Post
    I have used ramps from http://www.amramp.com/. They're not the cheapest solution and they will need painting periodically, but you'll not slip on that surface.
    Yeah, not liking the look of the metal ramp. Figuring it's going to spend a long and indefinite time in front of my house, I might as well make it looks nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by allenstevens View Post
    you can get the stuff they use for undercoating trucks or a type of truck bedliner this would work great
    Ooh, that's an idea, I wonder how that bonds to wood?

    Quote Originally Posted by jschism View Post
    i have a composite deck and part is always shaded. composite decks are NOT maintenance free, they need to be washed or the dirt that collects on it will get "moldy". still saves a step by not having to treat it. I've never had any problem with either the plain treated lumber or the composite.
    Well at least in this case, it is on the south side of the house and it will likely get as much sun as anything here in the PNW. Is the washing/scrubbing whatever just a yearly thing or do you have to do it more frequently.

    Thanks for all the suggestions, I appreciate it (and hoping the GF does as well!)

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ImWithHer View Post

    Well at least in this case, it is on the south side of the house and it will likely get as much sun as anything here in the PNW. Is the washing/scrubbing whatever just a yearly thing or do you have to do it more frequently.
    We live in the San Francisco East Bay area. Frankly, we have more problems with mold and mildew on our concrete hardscape than we do on the Trex deck and ramp (none). For us, cleaning the Trex deck and ramp is a quarterly, hose down and that is it...no scrubbing. Water drains right off the Trex and we have never had any slippery, mold on the Trex at all (east exposure).

    All the best,
    GJ

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ImWithHer View Post
    It think it would be great to do it out of concrete, but with a quick back of a napkin, I think it would take an unreasonable amount of concrete - on the order of 50 cubic yards. The issues is the house is on a side slope and with the door in the middle of the front of the house, so the ramp has to go the downhill direction first and then back towards the up hill direction where the driveway is. So the porch starts off like 3ft above the ground, but ramp will go down like 1ft vertical in one direction, but ends up like 10ft off the ground, due to the hillside, before going back the other direction and dropping the the other 2ft and meeting the ground near the driveway.

    But yeah I'm sure she would really enjoy the sentiment involved with a concrete ramp, just it would kind of end up looking much more massive than it needs to be.
    awe...sweet.....good luck with the project.
    "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

  4. #14
    Senior Member beecee's Avatar
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    i've always used 2x6 rdwd. the natural wearing away of the soft wood between the grains creates traction

  5. #15
    Senior Member NW-Will's Avatar
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    Just another wheeler who gets his suntan from the NorthWestern liquid sunshine. I have one ramp from http://ezaccess.com/, they are based just down I-5 in Algona, Washington. Not cheap but built specifically to do the job and never have to worry about traction. My friend built me a ramp out of some galvanized steel decking material, it was supposed to be temporary, but it is the best wheelchair decking for making a ramp out of, and is kind of permanent now as it works so well. I'll have to get some pictures.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by NW-Will View Post
    My friend built me a ramp out of some galvanized steel decking material, it was supposed to be temporary, but it is the best wheelchair decking for making a ramp out of, and is kind of permanent now as it works so well. I'll have to get some pictures.
    Yeah, I'd appreciate that, I had already considered welding together a metal substructure for the ramp, but still have wooden surface and railings etc as it would match the decor better, but I'd still be interested in seeing decking. Might inspire some other ideas.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by gjnl View Post
    Composite deck materials like Trex and Timbertech have a "wood grain"for slip resistance and they are mold and mildew resistant, no/low maintenance, and highly durable. These materials are used in national park and marina applications. My outdoor ramp in our back garden is Trex (Picture of my back garden deck attached below and a closeup of the surface).

    Picture of Wheelchair Ramp about 2/3 down the page:
    http://www.woodwiseconstruction.com/ramps.html

    Drawings and instructions for a wheelchair ramp using Trex:
    http://www.lowes.com/cd_Build+a+Whee...mp_1284487683_

    Plans and specifications:
    www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/design/cud/pubs_p/.../rampbooklet296final.pdf

    More project pictures (scroll down about half the page):
    http://www.pgbuildersandpotomacservi...dex.php?p=1_15
    That is a dangerous ramp!

    You tumble off that ramp and you will break bones! Where's the hand railing?

    That ramp is not to code or has been inspected the the building inspector.


    Ti
    "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by titanium4motion View Post
    That is a dangerous ramp!

    You tumble off that ramp and you will break bones! Where's the hand railing?

    That ramp is not to code or has been inspected the the building inspector.


    Ti
    Yes, there are no hand rails, I couldn't use them anyway, and if I was that out of control the hand rails would garrote me in the throat. The bumpers are high enough to stop my chair from going over. I don't take the ramp at reckless speeds. The ramp is 1:12 (in my power chair I don't really need that ratio, but it is there) and has a flat resting space, mid span (I don't really need that in my power chair either). This is a ramp in my personal residence and does not have to meet ADA or commercial code. It is not the primary ramp I use for access to my house. This ramp is in my back garden. Yes, a building inspector has seen it, but since this is a single family residence there is no enforceable requirements. It is my prerogative to build what I feel best suits my needs and standards. If I sell the house the ramp can be removed easily without detriment to the deck, which by code does not need hand railing either because it is not connected to the house and is less than three feet high. 99.9% of the people who will buy this house will not want or need the ramp.

    I posted the picture of the ramp not as a suggested design for anyone to emulate, but to give the original poster an idea of what Trek looks like in a ramp application.

    All the best,
    GJ
    Last edited by gjnl; 01-23-2012 at 04:54 PM.

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