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Thread: UST Inc. Licenses Potential Spinal Injury Drug Treatment (Paul in this the article)

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    UST Inc. Licenses Potential Spinal Injury Drug Treatment (Paul in this the article)

    UST Inc. Licenses Potential Spinal Injury Drug Treatment

    An other older article below

    http://www.usask.ca/events/news/arti...0030410-2.html

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 10, 2003 2003-04-02- OTHER UST Inc. Licenses Potential Spinal Injury Drug Treatment A new drug treatment with potential to reduce the devastating effects of spinal cord and brain injury has been licensed by the University of Saskatchewan's technology transfer company to a new start-up firm at Innovation Place on campus. University of Saskatchewan Technologies (UST) Inc. has recently licensed the pharmaceutical technology, developed in a U of S College of Medicine lab, to Triage Therapeutics Inc. Triage, managed by Winnipeg-based Lombard Life Sciences, will arrange for further experimentation including possible human testing, with a view to commercializing the technology. Lombard manages the $90-M Western Life Sciences Venture Fund LP, which creates, acquires and develops emerging life sciences companies. The Crown Investment Corporation (CIC) of Saskatchewan is an investor. "This is an example of how outstanding, curiosity-driven lab research translates into new technology that can potentially benefit both human health and the economy," said Bryan Harvey, UST Inc. board chair and Acting Vice-President of Research. "UST and the University are committed to ensuring that exciting discoveries by our researchers are translated into commercial opportunities that will benefit society, the researchers, and the University." Harvey made the announcement today at the Saskatchewan Investment Futures Forum hosted by CIC and Saskatchewan Industry and Resources. "There is enormous energy and creativity in the research community in Saskatchewan," said Lombard CEO and Triage President Kevin McGarry. "This licensing agreement is a model of how the researchers, business and the government sector can work together to bring truly beneficial products to market." In a published, peer-reviewed study, a U of S research team has shown that the new drug treatment can prevent paraplegia and associated long-term damage in rats with spinal cord injuries by limiting the secondary damage from inflammation that follows such injuries. A U.S. patent was obtained last July for the technology. "If this treatment has the same impact on humans as we've shown that it has on laboratory animals, then it could have a major impact in treating both spinal cord injury and brain injury," said Bernhard Juurlink, lead investigator and head of the U of S department of anatomy and cell biology. He notes that more than 1,000 Canadians sustain spinal cord injuries per year. It's estimated that 55,000 Canadians incur a traumatic brain injury, mainly from vehicle crashes, firearm use, and falls, each year. The treatment involves administering a compound known as L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate or OTC soon after injury. With early OTC treatment, animals with injuries that would normally cause paralysis can walk, but the treatment has not yet been tested on humans. "Preventing spinal cord damage from inflammation caused by oxidative stress is more effective than trying to repair the damage after it has been done," Juurlink says. Triage will now undertake further research to determine the appropriate dosage of OTC and how soon after injury the drug needs to be given in order to be effective. Clinical trials could begin within two years. Initial-stage human testing has already been done elsewhere on OTC in relation to other conditions such as ALS. Juurlink's team includes neurosurgeon Robert Griebel, nutrition professor Phyllis Paterson, post-doctoral fellow Huse Kamencic and clinical research fellow Elisabeth Schultke. The lab is one of the few in Canada working on prevention of secondary damage in the wake of neck or brain injury. If further testing proves successful, regulatory approval is granted, and Triage takes the drug treatment to market, royalties will be paid to UST and shared with SGI as a result of its funding of this important research. Juurlink notes that the new drug treatment is the result of a decade of basic research supported by federal and provincial partners, Saskatchewan Government Insurance, the Christopher Reeve Foundation, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Saskatchewan. Over the past five years, UST has helped to set up seven new companies in Saskatoon, ranging from small consulting companies to high-tech nanotechnology and bio-pharmaceutical firms. -30- For more information, contact: Kathryn Warden U of S Research Communications (306) 966-2506 kathryn.warden@usask.ca www.usask.ca/research Bernhard Juurlink Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology University of Saskatchewan (306) 966-4083 Kevin McGarry President and CEO Lombard Life Sciences (204) 943-0066



    Discovery by U of S Researchers May Help Prevent Paraplegia


    http://www.usask.ca/events/news/arti...0010309-3.html


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - 10 a.m. Friday, March 9, 2001 2001-03-05-ME Discovery by U of S Researchers May Help Prevent Paraplegia In a just-published article, University of Saskatchewan researchers have shown that a new drug is effective in preventing paraplegia in rats with spinal cord injuries. Human clinical trials of this promising treatment are expected to begin in a year or two. "If it works as effectively in humans as in rats, it should greatly reduce the devastating effects of spinal cord injury," says Bernhard Juurlink, head of the department of anatomy and cell biology and leader of the team working on the new treatment. The team's findings were recently published in the prestigious Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal. Every year more than 1,000 Canadians sustain spinal cord injuries that cause permanent damage. including paraplegia and quadraplegia. Juurlink notes that the body's response to spinal cord injury causes oxidative stress (increased levels of very reactive oxygen). This starts a chain reaction leading to inflammation that can do as much damage as the initial injury. Preventing oxidative stress and inflammation from damaging the spinal cord is more effective than trying to repair the damage after it has been done, he says. Along with neurosurgeon Robert Griebel, pharmacy professor Phyllis Paterson, post-doctoral fellow Huse Kamencic and clinical research fellow Elisabeth Schültke, Juurlink is investigating methods of reducing oxidative stress in the spinal cord by administering a compound known as L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate or OTC soon after injury. The drug methylprednisolone is currently used to reduce secondary damage after spinal cord injuries, but OTC stops the chain reaction leading to oxidative stress earlier than does methylprednisolone, and so appears to be more effective. The team has shown that in rats, OTC greatly decreases oxidative stress in the injured tissue, resulting in greatly reduced secondary damage. With OTC treatment, animals with injuries that would normally cause paralysis can walk. The study concludes that since the rats show "significant retention of function", this may be an effective treatment for spinal cord injury in humans. The central nervous system is basically the same in all mammals, so the positive results in animal trials are promising. But Juurlink cautions, "There are a lot of drugs that work in rats that don't necessarily work in people." For example, drugs need to move from the bloodstream into the brain and spinal cord in order to combat oxidative stress, but a drug that crosses the blood-brain barrier in rats may not do so in humans. The Saskatchewan Neurotrauma Initiative is currently funding his spinal cord injury research. Juurlink also receives funding from the Regional Partnership Program, a jointly funded initiative of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Saskatchewan government. Further research still needs to be done to determine the appropriate dosage of OTC and how soon after injury it needs to be given. For the initial experiment, the rats were given OTC 30 minutes after the injury. Juurlink says he suspects OTC is most effective if given within three hours, and has some positive effect if given up to 24 hours after injury. This is the 'therapeutic window' during which methylprednisolone is effective in reducing oxidative stress. Because OTC has already been used in treating other problems such as respiratory distress and ALS, it is likely that clinical trials can begin relatively quickly, said Juurlink. For more examples of how U of S researchers are helping to unravel the mysteries of the brain and the nervous system, attend "Brain Show 2001" Sunday, March 18 at City Hospital. The event is organized by the Saskatchewan Neuroscience Network. Kathryn Warden Research Communications Officer University of Saskatchewan Tel: (306) 966-2506 Fax: (306) 966-2411 kathryn.warden@usask.ca http://www.usask.ca/research Bernhard Juurlink Head of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology University of Saskatchewan Tel: (306) 966-4083 Fax: (306) 966-4298 Juurlink@duke.usask.ca

    "WAKE ME UP WHEN IT'S OVER !!!"

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  3. #3
    Interesting. Here is one abstract of an earlier paper published with this drug:

    • Kamencic H, Griebel RW, Lyon AW, Paterson PG and Juurlink BH (2001). Promoting glutathione synthesis after spinal cord trauma decreases secondary damage and promotes retention of function. Faseb J 15:243-250. Summary: The study aimed to 1) quantify oxidative stress in spinal cord after crush injury at T6, 2) determine whether the administration of the procysteine compound L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC) would up-regulate glutathione (GSH) synthesis and decrease oxidative stress, and 3) determine whether decreased oxidative stress results in better tissue and function retention. We demonstrate that spinal cord compression (5 s with a 50 g aneurysm clip) at T6 in rats results in oxidative stress that is extensive (significant increases in oxidative stress seen at C3 and L4) and rapid in onset. Indices of oxidative stress used were GSH content, protein carbonyl content, and inactivation of glutathione reductase. Administration of OTC resulted in a marked decrease in oxidative stress associated with a sparing of white matter at T6 (16+/-1.9% retained in OTC-treated animals vs. less than 1% in saline-treated). Behavioral indices in control, saline-treated, and OTC-treated animals after 6 wk were respectively: angle board scores (59 degrees, 32 degrees, and 42 degrees ), modified Tarlov score (7, 2.4, and 4.1), and Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score (21, 5.3, and 12.9). We conclude that administration of OTC after spinal cord trauma greatly decreases oxidative stress and allows tissue preservation, thereby enabling otherwise paraplegic animals to locomote. Department of Anatomy, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

  4. #4
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    Greetings

    Thanks for finding and posting the article

    Paul

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