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Thread: MRI Copy: Would this be acceptable?

  1. #1

    MRI Copy: Would this be acceptable?

    Folks,

    I gave up trying to scan my MRIs as the flatbed was having none of it. In the end I placed my films over a backlight (LCD monitor) and used my digital camera. I've put 5 of the images online at the following address:-

    http://www.costain.org/mri/

    My question is, would these be of an acceptable quality to email to a Doctor a quick diagnosis?

    No idea what kind of injury I have, or whether it's compressed etc. (any ideas?) but I like to think I did a decent job!


    Andy.

    --
    To reply to me via email, replace 'spambucket' with 'andy'.

  2. #2
    Good job, Andy! They look great... in image quality, that is. My MRIs look somewhat similar.

    -Steven

  3. #3
    I agree with Steven. You have gotten pretty good image quality using a digital camera. Before the advent of the digital era, neurosurgeons often took pictures of x-rays with their cameras with the x-ray mounted on a fluorescent light box. To scan films properly, you need a film scanner with a backlight. Regarding whether this would be acceptable to a surgeon, I think that they may be.

    By the way, looking at the pictures, there are several images that suggest the presence of a dark line that seems to go all the way across the spinal cord, giving the impression of a transection. However, if you look at other images from the series, you see images indicating tissue continuity across the injury site. Furthermore, a dark streak does not necessarily indicate that the spinal cord is cut.

    MRI signals represent the amount of hydrogen. The brighter the signal, the greater the concentration of hydrogen. Since water or H2O has the highest concentration of hydrogen, cerebrospinal fluid should be the brightest. Tissue with less water content should appear darker. If you look at the brain, you will find cerebrospinal fluid surrounding the brain.

    Shortly after the injury (months), the injury site will show enhanced magnetic resonance, probably reflecting the presence of edema and increased extracellular space. This, however, will decline with time. When was this MRI taken (after injury)?

    Note that the radiologist can change the contrast and appearance of the MRI that is printed out from the datafile. Also, different MRI machines have produce different quality and types of images. Thus, the best person to read an MRI is a radiologist who knows the idiosyncrasies of the particular machine and the settings of the program.

    Wise.

  4. #4
    Originally posted by Wise Young:

    Shortly after the injury (months), the injury site will show enhanced magnetic resonance, probably reflecting the presence of edema and increased extracellular space. This, however, will decline with time. When was this MRI taken (after injury)?
    Thank you for the informative reply, Wise.

    This MRI was taken a little over 10 years after my injury in 1990. There is definately some cord intact as I still have a great deal of touch sensation below my level (lower back, stomach, right leg/foot/toes and anus), as for motor function, I'm a typical C5/6.


    Andy.

    --
    To reply to me via email, replace 'spambucket' with 'andy'.

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