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Thread: Mark's Roadracepowerpod road proof

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    Thanks Nirvana, it is a great addition and has brought the excitment of riding back again. After 36 years h/c I've seen all the comings and goings of handcycles and their manufactuers. I think Jannsen had a bike out, other than that, I had mine built by a special effects guy and a bike frame maker. I still have it hanging on my wall and hope to donate it to a museum someday.

    I bought one of Freedom Ryders first bikes when they were still made in texas, '81 I think it was and one of Chris Petersons first Top End not to long after, I think it was called an X or XL. back then there wasn't any handcycle specific parts such as handle, cranks or seats. It all had to be modified from a a/b bike. My first seat was literally a plastic kitchen chair. My leg troughs were curtain hangers with drain spouts for the troughs. My feet were splayed out and the front wheel was way in front of my feet. the bike must have been 8 feet long. But it sure was a cruiser.

    The powerpod is at least 1/2 the cost of the 2,400.oo bionix. The 250Ht imo looks a little under powered. I think the 350Ht with a 48vlt setup($2900.00) woud be scukuum and match the powerpod which is at least 1/2 less than the 250HT. the nice thing about the pp is it can be quickly unmounted and the person could ride/race; hook it back on and cruise home. So many could really use it. From the hi quad rookie to the top pros for training. As Scott said, ya get the feel that you are working hard, it just feels like you are doing it with a tailwind. I like Marks setup in that a person uses a throttle for accereation while the Bionix uses 25%,50 up to 300%stages. With the throttle the speed and usage of the battery is up to the rider.

    My wife mentioned that I'm a lot like Wilbur Wright. Rode/built one of the first, if not the first, custom handbuilt handcycle ever and am now riding a highly custom production bike with one of the first power assist built. We've gone a long way from bikes built with plastic kitchen chairs and curtain/rain gutter leg troughs to bikes like the Top End Force X. It's been a good ride all these years, I trust I have many more left thanks to the power pod
    Patrick, not to go off topic too far, but you said that your shoulders are pretty well worn out, I know you've been SCI quite sometime but would attribute some it to all the handcycling you've done over the years or do you just think its mainly from pushing in the chair and trasfers, etc? I'm just thinking maybe a younger person using the power assist for 20 to 40 mile rides might be able to prevent some of the shoulder problems down the road. I'm fortunate so far, coming up on 31 years SCI this coming May and my shoulders still seem fine and as everyone knows I do ride a lot. My wrists feel like they are starting to get worn out and my legs are getting tougher and tougher to straighten out, guess I need to do more range of motion.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  2. #22
    I took it out again today, by myself. Got a really good ride thanks to it. I can't express how much I like it. I can see how it's going to enable me to keep riding for a long time.It felt like the old days when I could just bomb up the hills with ease. On the hills where I would struggle up in the small gears, I flew up them in the tall gears. What a great feeling. I think I get a better cardio workout with it because instead of going at a slower cadence trying to keep the momentum going, I can go faster with a faster cadence using the larger gears and not having a problem keeping the momentum going. Like Scott said ,"It feels like your riding with a tailwind". This is going to be a great training tool in the summer using a heartrate monitor and cadence counter. I use a Blackburn bike comp. with h/r and cadence. With heavy clothes on, the h/r doesn't pick up the beats . Was 35o today.


    Personally, I think the rig outdoes the Bionox FRH. It can be dettached and has a throttle for minute settings rather than the set settings the bio uses. They do have a throttle buts it's an option. I think having the added weight up front would be a slight hinderence when not using the bio. I like the weight at the back, it seems to really settle the rear wheels when going downhill. The bike is slower when not using the electric assist but I figure it's just another tool to get in shape with; kind of like training as an a/b using a weighted backpack when hiking. The Bio is a clean setup though and the Lithium battery only weighs something like 7 lbs. but can't be detached if a person wants to race or ride manually. The pp tracks behind the bike with no drag that I can feel.

    I'm thrilled with it Mark. It is so much fun to get out there and ride hard but not putting stress on these ole busted up shoulders. I think this has the possibility to completley change handcycling by allowing those who are more marginalized to ride with their friends at a good pace. This is a win/win machine. Again, I can't tell you how much I appreciate knowing that I can continue to ride. I was getting very concerned about the possibility of needing to quit due to the stress on the shoulders latley. But now that thought is a distant memory.

  3. #23
    Senior Member tooley's Avatar
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    thanks for your opinion Pat. Alot of wisdom there. Your photos have given me a new idea for the future - a h/c camping vacation in the Rockies. w/the power and added wheelbase to carry gear and my w/c it seems possible. We have an excellent facility in Kananaska [sp] country for the disabled that I could use as a base camp for bathroom/shower.

    and you are like the Wright brothers. thanks from all those here that you help and MERRY CHRISTMAS!

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    Patrick, not to go off topic too far, but you said that your shoulders are pretty well worn out, I know you've been SCI quite sometime but would attribute some it to all the handcycling you've done over the years or do you just think its mainly from pushing in the chair and trasfers, etc? I'm just thinking maybe a younger person using the power assist for 20 to 40 mile rides might be able to prevent some of the shoulder problems down the road. I'm fortunate so far, coming up on 31 years SCI this coming May and my shoulders still seem fine and as everyone knows I do ride a lot. My wrists feel like they are starting to get worn out and my legs are getting tougher and tougher to straighten out, guess I need to do more range of motion.
    Hey Curt, Good question, I've been pondering that myself. Yeah it's just all the sports, wheeling and I suppose handcycling also for 38 years. Everything went well until around three years ago; I went from bench pressing 350lbs on my 60th birthday to 0 probably six months later. It may have been all the small tears and rips thru the years, who knows. Might have been the cortizone shots, the 60 foot highfalls as an a/b.

    We used to laugh at the remarks from the older guys telling us to take care of our shoulders; we were young and invincible. Now I find myself saying the same thing that they did.

    After riding with the powerpod I would have to agree with you in that it could help save a lot of distress later on for the younger riders. That's the beauty of the pp; a person doesn't have to have it attached 100% of the time. It's a great training tool,at a good cost, for those that want to race or just ride faster or ride with a/b friends for 30 miles with little stress on the shoulders.

    I really don't know if my lifestyle caused the bum shoulders, probably did but being such a type A personality, I don't think I would have done anything different. It's kind of a damned if we do or damned if we don't thing.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by tooley View Post
    thanks for your opinion Pat. Alot of wisdom there. Your photos have given me a new idea for the future - a h/c camping vacation in the Rockies. w/the power and added wheelbase to carry gear and my w/c it seems possible. We have an excellent facility in Kananaska [sp] country for the disabled that I could use as a base camp for bathroom/shower.

    and you are like the Wright brothers. thanks from all those here that you help and MERRY CHRISTMAS!
    Thanks T. That means a lot to me. I want this stuff to continue. We need to further it along or it will die. One idea bears another and another. Your idea is a great example; with power and the added platform,we could take it off road and go camping.

    Alberta has one heck of a sports program. Their desire to maximize disabled athletes back in the early '80's provided Canada with some of it's best athletes and propelled it to world class status. Much of the Wheelchair sports programs we have now came from ideas that were borne from guys in Alberta; seems it still does.

  6. #26
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    could this be installed on any kind of trike? if so im interested in one. my trike is pedal, but I am not strong enough to use it now.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    could this be installed on any kind of trike? if so im interested in one. my trike is pedal, but I am not strong enough to use it now.

    Hello Jody, yes it does work on trikes. I have a trike myself that I attach it to the rear of. I'll post a pic of the Power Pod attached to my trike this weekend - I have 2 brackets, one on my handcycle and one on the trike so I can switch the same Power Pod between both.....


    Hey Patrick, those pictures are great! and great to finally see what you look like in action! I see what you mean about your roads being a little rough over your way.....

    My parents fly in tonight for Christmas. My father is a cyclist. I am so excited to finally be able to take him on a decent ride up on some of the amazing Georgia roads. We used to cycle together before my accident, so this is gonna be very cool to both go cycling together again....

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkB701 View Post
    Hello Jody, yes it does work on trikes. I have a trike myself that I attach it to the rear of. I'll post a pic of the Power Pod attached to my trike this weekend - I have 2 brackets, one on my handcycle and one on the trike so I can switch the same Power Pod between both.....


    Hey Patrick, those pictures are great! and great to finally see what you look like in action! I see what you mean about your roads being a little rough over your way.....

    My parents fly in tonight for Christmas. My father is a cyclist. I am so excited to finally be able to take him on a decent ride up on some of the amazing Georgia roads. We used to cycle together before my accident, so this is gonna be very cool to both go cycling together again....
    Mark in looking at the photo of your rig attached I'm thinking it would not be too hard to build a aluminum platform rack between the seat backrest on the handcycle and the rack of the PP. This platform could be used to bungy cord down the wheelchair after removing it's wheels fairly easily I'd think whilst seated on the handcycle. This would be a great way to take the chair with you and off course with the PP you'd not have to worry about the extra weight going up hills. You should think about something like that and offer it as a option.

    Also Mark the comment I made about the power pod being able to be used for Marathons is a valid one as it would really level out the field if a calculation could be made as to the specific amount of charge the battery had at the start of the race based on the persons disability. For years I've been doing Marathons and they are so unfair as obviously a person who is 40 percent less disabled (say a L1 injury) vs a person (say a t-4 injury, me) is going to cover the ground a heck of a lot faster. My best in a 26 miler is around 2 hours, a L1 guy has done it in around 1 and half hours. So say the PP had a digital readout showing the amount of charge and it was calculated that I got a 84 percent battery charge to be equal to the L1 guy that would make it fair. Age could also be factored in as obviously a 24 year old has a large advantage over a 53 year old. Trying to get this approved and have people not be worried that is cheating could be a trick, but I'd be willing to push for it if I can ever get myself healthy again.
    Last edited by Curt Leatherbee; 12-23-2011 at 01:15 PM.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    Hey Curt, Good question, I've been pondering that myself. Yeah it's just all the sports, wheeling and I suppose handcycling also for 38 years. Everything went well until around three years ago; I went from bench pressing 350lbs on my 60th birthday to 0 probably six months later. It may have been all the small tears and rips thru the years, who knows. Might have been the cortizone shots, the 60 foot highfalls as an a/b.

    We used to laugh at the remarks from the older guys telling us to take care of our shoulders; we were young and invincible. Now I find myself saying the same thing that they did.

    After riding with the powerpod I would have to agree with you in that it could help save a lot of distress later on for the younger riders. That's the beauty of the pp; a person doesn't have to have it attached 100% of the time. It's a great training tool,at a good cost, for those that want to race or just ride faster or ride with a/b friends for 30 miles with little stress on the shoulders.

    I really don't know if my lifestyle caused the bum shoulders, probably did but being such a type A personality, I don't think I would have done anything different. It's kind of a damned if we do or damned if we don't thing.
    Patrick, sorry for that question, after I asked it, I said to myself, how the heck would any of us really know how we damaged our bodies over such a number of years, it would be hard to tell. In thinking about it though, more than likely it was not so much the handcycle, but more than likely pushing hard in the chair and transfers and that sort of thing. The 300lb bench pressing probably did not help out much either, you must have been a beast, lol. Like you said though, we live our lives like we want to and we cannot go back and change things.

    How long would you say it took you to initially set up the power pak to the FRH, I think I may be sold on getting one of these, it is a lot less money than the other systems out there I believe.
    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Leatherbee View Post
    Mark in looking at the photo of your rig attached I'm thinking it would not be too hard to build a aluminum platform rack between the seat backrest on the handcycle and the rack of the PP. This platform could be used to bungy cord down the wheelchair after removing it's wheels fairly easily I'd think whilst seated on the handcycle. This would be a great way to take the chair with you and off course with the PP you'd not have to worry about the extra weight going up hills. You should think about something like that and offer it as a option.

    ....funny you should mention all this. As a matter of fact I am working on the following:




    Pack the bags with all you need for a tour. Then strap the wheelchair frame (EXCLUDING wheels) onto the panniers. I would then provide an adaptor to enable you to easily detach the handcycle rear wheels and mount them up to the wheelchair.

    We could either just use the original handcycle rims on the chair (you would just do without the pushrims while on your tour), or use wheechair rims (with the pushrims) on your handcycle. Either way.

    In order to make the transfer a cheap collapsable aluminum stool would also be placed on the Power Pod so you could get off the bike in order to do all this......of course having someone to help you would be nice too lol.

    THEN - instead of using the cheaper sealed-lead-acid batteries, you could take 3 Lithium-Iron batteries (each giving 30+miles). These would be packed into the panniers. They are only 7lbs each so would weigh the same as the single SLA.

    Can you imagine the potential??? Long rides, and the ability to stop along the way and use a chair??? If you went with a group you could stay overnight too with lots of space to pack stuff.....you would charge the batteries over night......

    Hells I could see some adventerous para's cycling from coast to coast etc.....now there's and adventure..!!!



    ETA: I would have a simple 2-legged stand drop from the rear axle to enable the rear wheels to be removed. It would be similar to th center-stand that you can see on the Power Pod. This would make removal of those 2 wheels easier in order to attach them to your chair......still working on this tho....

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