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Thread: Symposium to feature spinal cord expert Young

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Symposium to feature spinal cord expert Young

    Symposium to feature spinal cord expert Young



    Patients who are victims of spinal cord injuries can attend a free spinal cord symposium at 4:30 p.m. March 25 at the Ambassador Hotel.

    Family members also are welcome.

    The Baptist St. Anthony Foundation and Second Chance Foundation will sponsor the symposium. Facilitators Dr. Wise Young and Dr. Patricia Morton will discuss advances in spinal cord injury rehabilitation and long-term effects.

    All quadraplegic and paraplegic patients or people who have suffered a spinal cord injury and their families can attend, according to a news release from Mary Barlow of BSA.

    Barlow said Young and Morton will stay and talk to all who attend as long as there are questions.

    Max Brown, director of BSA Foundation, said, "We cannot believe our good fortune to have Drs. Young and Morton in Amarillo to talk to all of our good friends who have spinal cord injuries.

    "When they have this symposium, they gather everyone together and start talking and networking with patients and family members. They will share the latest in spinal cord injury research and rehabilitation."

    Young is director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience and a professor at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He has a bachelor of arts degree from Reed College, a doctorate from the University of Iowa and a medical degree from Stanford University.

    Well-known as a leader in spinal cord injury research, Young has appeared on "20/20" with Barbara Walters and Christopher Reeve, "48 Hours," "Today," "Eye-to-Eye," Fox News and CNN's news magazine with Jeff Greenfield. Last year, "Time" magazine named Young as "America's Best" in the field of spinal cord injury research.

    The symposium is open to the public. Seating is limited and reservations are required. Call 212-7645.


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  2. #2
    GREAT PICTURE DR. YOUNG. I am forwarding this on to my quad friend in Texas.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Josh's Avatar
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    I wonder what the area code is on that phone number? ???-212-7645? I would love to take a short trip to Amarillo to see Dr. Young.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Josh, try area code 806.

    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

  5. #5
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    Joshua, I'm from Amarillo and will be at the symposium. Hope to see you there.

    Rapid 524

  6. #6
    Senior Member Josh's Avatar
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    rapid 524,

    I'm going to call tomorrow and reserve a spot.
    I look forward to meeting you and anyone else from Carecure. See ya soon,

    Josh

  7. #7
    Senior Member Josh's Avatar
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    Well,I just got back from Amarillo. I wanted to fill you guys in on what I learned....actually I learned absolutely nothing. But this is great news. This web-site keeps us as up to date as anyone. But the real reason I went was to meet Dr.Young and Dr.Morton. And let me tell you guys that they are angels. If there is such a thing as angels on earth then they are it. Dr.Yong and Dr. Morton are two of the most caring and compassionate people I have ever met. We are so lucky to have them working on "the cure". I also got the opportunity to meet Kort and Rapid 524. It is really cool to meet people that you have talked to on the computer for so long.

    Dr. Young and Dr. Morton,

    Thanks again for all that you do. One day it will pay off.

    Josh

  8. #8
    That's true Josh, Patricia is great and I've never been in the presence of anyone as warm or as kind as Dr. Young. I'm glad I had the opportunity to meet them both.

    [This message was edited by seneca on 03-27-03 at 12:14 PM.]

  9. #9
    Author Topic: Â* Neuroscientists discuss spinal cord advances
    Jeremy

    Member posted Mar 27, 2003 11:05 AM Â*
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Neuroscientists discuss spinal cord advances
    By JOE CHAPMAN

    3/27/2003

    http://www.amarillonet.com/stories/0...w_spinal.shtml

    jchapman@amarillonet.com

    Spinal cord injury research hasn't yet produced a cure, but two neuroscientists visiting Amarillo on Tuesday offered patients and their families something else helpful: knowledge.

    Drs. Wise Young and Patricia Morton of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, were guest speakers at a symposium in the Ambassador Hotel, sponsored by the BSA Foundation and the Second Chance Foundation. About 135 people attended.

    Alfred Altmiller, who attended the symposium with his wife, asked Young for advice about exercising. Altmiller has experienced 70 percent loss of function in his legs during the past 10 years, as the result of injuries he suffered in World War II. He wanted to know how much bike riding he should do per week to help his regeneration.

    "I can't tell that riding a bike helps that much," Altmiller said. "And I push the lawn mower. My wife gets onto me for that."

    Young suggested that Altmiller follow the general guidelines for able-bodied people - exercising three to five times a week. He also discouraged walking routines, which can damage joints, and instead recommended swimming, which doesn't strain muscles or bones.

    Rebekah Hensley asked how much information patients and their families should have access to regarding their medical conditions. She has been told by doctors to worry about only what her mind can handle, she said.

    Her husband receives radiation therapy for tumors between his vertebrae.
    She found out on her own - not from his doctors - about a condition he's susceptible to called cervical chordoma, she said. It could have led to paralysis if she hadn't known to ask the doctors about it, she said.

    Young agreed that she's entitled to no limit of information, and he recommended the Web site http://sciwire.com, which is updated daily with new information about spinal cord injury.

    Young told the audience about clinical trials and promising therapies.
    In trials at Purdue University, researchers have had some success using electrical devices to send alternating currents to stimulate spinal cord regeneration in dogs.

    Although human fetal stem cells aren't available for research in the United States, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and Albany Medical Center in New York have tried transplanting pig fetal stem cells into AIDS patients, Young said. Their results haven't been published yet.

    One audience member wanted to know whether the American Medical Association or the Food and Drug Administration are hindering research in spinal cord injuries, because many advancements seem to come from overseas, he said.

    "I think the problem is not with the FDA or AMA," Young said. "It's with our society not investing in clinical trials for spinal cord injuries" to the extent that other diseases are being researched.

    Morton told about programs in other states that pull dollars from traffic ticket fines to go toward spinal cord research.

    An organization called Quest for the Cure is working to get a similar program established in Texas, she said.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posts: 352Â*|Â*Registered: 07-24-01

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