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Thread: Tooth pulp stem cells regenerate spinal cord

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    Jerry, you have previously advised that chondroitinase alone might well be effective in incomplete injuries. And you suggested from your experiments that a peripheral nerve bridge and chondroitinase might address the lack of axons at the injury site for complete injuries.

    I know you propse to write a paper on this but are there any decent ones already written regarding peripheral nerve bridging? Has combining the bridging with chondroitinase been written about?

    thanks
    This is our best effort. July 14 Nature

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature10199
    Functional regeneration of respiratory
    pathways after spinal cord injury
    Warren J. Alilain1, Kevin P. Horn1, Hongmei Hu1, Thomas E. Dick1,2 & Jerry Silver1

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    Jerry, you have previously advised that chondroitinase alone might well be effective in incomplete injuries. And you suggested from your experiments that a peripheral nerve bridge and chondroitinase might address the lack of axons at the injury site for complete injuries.

    I know you propse to write a paper on this but are there any decent ones already written regarding peripheral nerve bridging? Has combining the bridging with chondroitinase been written about?

    thanks
    This is a video about the paper that's already been written. Maybe this will help.





    In addition, I like the information in this recent J. Fawcett paper concerning the use of chondroitinase.
    • Development/Plasticity/Repair
    Chondroitinase ABC Combined with Neurotrophin NT-3 Secretion and NR2D Expression Promotes Axonal Plasticity and Functional Recovery in Rats with Lateral Hemisection of the Spinal Cord

    1. Guillermo GarcĂ*a-AlĂ*as1,
    2. Hayk A. Petrosyan2,3,
    3. Lisa Schnell4,
    4. Philip J. Horner5,
    5. William J. Bowers6,
    6. Lorne M. Mendell3,
    7. James W. Fawcett1, and
    8. Victor L. Arvanian2,3
    + Author Affiliations
    1. 1Centre for Brain Repair, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0PY, United Kingdom,
    2. 2Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Northport, New York 11768,
    3. 3Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794,
    4. 4University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Brain Research Institute, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland,
    5. 5University of Washington, Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, and
    6. 6Department of Neurology, Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642
    + Author Notes
    • G. GarcĂ*a-AlĂ*as' present address: Department of Integrative Biology & Physiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095.
    1. Author contributions: G.G.-A., L.S., L.M.M., J.W.F., and V.L.A. designed research; G.G.-A., H.A.P., L.S., and V.L.A. performed research; P.J.H. and W.J.B. contributed unpublished reagents/analytic tools; G.G.-A., H.A.P., L.S., P.J.H., W.J.B., L.M.M., J.W.F., and V.L.A. analyzed data; G.G.-A., L.M.M., J.W.F., and V.L.A. wrote the paper.
    Abstract

    Elevating spinal levels of neurotrophin NT-3 (NT3) while increasing expression of the NR2D subunit of the NMDA receptor using a HSV viral construct promotes formation of novel multisynaptic projections from lateral white matter (LWM) axons to motoneurons in neonates. However, this treatment is ineffective after postnatal day 10. Because chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) treatment restores plasticity in the adult CNS, we have added ChABC to this treatment and applied the combination to adult rats receiving a left lateral hemisection (Hx) at T8. All hemisected animals initially dragged the ipsilateral hindpaw and displayed abnormal gait. Rats treated with ChABC or NT3/HSV-NR2D recovered partial hindlimb locomotor function, but animals receiving combined therapy displayed the most improved body stability and interlimb coordination [Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale and gait analysis]. Electrical stimulation of the left LWM at T6 did not evoke any synaptic response in ipsilateral L5 motoneurons of control hemisected animals, indicating interruption of the white matter. Only animals with the full combination treatment recovered consistent multisynaptic responses in these motoneurons indicating formation of a detour pathway around the Hx. These physiological findings were supported by the observation of increased branching of both cut and intact LWM axons into the gray matter near the injury. ChABC-treated animals displayed more sprouting than control animals and those receiving NT3/HSV-NR2D; animals receiving the combination of all three treatments showed the most sprouting. Our results indicate that therapies aimed at increasing plasticity, promoting axon growth and modulating synaptic function have synergistic effects and promote better functional recovery than if applied individually.

    These findings show the additive effects of combining chondroitinase ABC, NT3 and enhancing NR2D expression in promoting the formation or strengthening of spinal circuits and modest functional recovery. In addition, the results indicate the feasibility of combination treatments to promote spinal cord repair. Arvanian and his group have shown that such a synergistic approach is better than single therapies for treating spinal cord injury. It seems likely that future regeneration-promoting therapies will be applied to humans in combinations and will include both acute and chronic injuries.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 12-14-2011 at 01:06 AM.

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by jsilver View Post
    This is our best effort. July 14 Nature

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature10199
    Functional regeneration of respiratory
    pathways after spinal cord injury
    Warren J. Alilain1, Kevin P. Horn1, Hongmei Hu1, Thomas E. Dick1,2 & Jerry Silver1
    This is a good video of explanation also with Chondrointinase and also the pten knockout is discussed...

    http://vimeo.com/24575964

    I like to hear about getting rid of scar tissue and rocket fuel for axons!!!!!!
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 12-14-2011 at 03:41 PM.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs770 View Post
    This seems kind of harsh to me.
    talking about jsilver

    And clearly unprofessional, with a tinge of elitist tone.
    JimmyMack
    Member: New Jersey Commission on Spinal Cord Reasearch
    http://www.state.nj.us/health/spinalcord/index.shtml

  5. #65
    Grammy I read these studies and see words like" improved" or "increased" I need to see "restored" "robust" or else all these studies did was provide a paycheck and some slightly useful information...............
    One more thing. We all have had invasive surgery ie when you broke your neck. the effects are severe! a graft may damage more of you than it fixes!
    to expose that area and graft it so aggressive I believe the risk of fatality is quite high. recovery from shock and swelling may increase damage. This is not a well placed injection . This is surgery! could take years to get an idea of what happened.

    My best bet is scaffolding, pten blockers, stem cells of some type and inhibitory blockers/ neurotrophins. where's that study?

    Last edited by jhope; 12-14-2011 at 07:17 PM.

  6. #66
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    Jhope is right i guess.

    Some strong combination therapy is needed soon.

    Just hope Wise will be doing this in his coming next trial. Dont know whether he will be thinking for saffolds or not?

  7. #67
    pten elimination not viable or deliverable as of yet in humans. They are as we speak working on it.
    scaffold in trials soon.
    all the rest kind of ...........
    wise is doing cord blood lithium which has shown in animal studies to work as well as most studies. even some recovery is huge as it is safe and not invasive and could be a treatment in just a few years

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by jhope View Post
    Grammy I read these studies and see words like" improved" or "increased" I need to see "restored" "robust" or else all these studies did was provide a paycheck and some slightly useful information...............
    My best bet is scaffolding, pten blockers, stem cells of some type and inhibitory blockers/ neurotrophins. where's that study?
    I must disagree jhope. I've learned that the "restored"-"robust" terminology you need to see is perhaps overused in too many published papers. I've seen too much vocabulary such as this, but when the therapy is run through multiple replication labs...the results only turn out to be "meager" at best. Highly disappointing, so I put no stock in those words until they are proven TRUE in the replication labs. Just because it's in print, doesn't necessarily mean it is correct at all. So even the hyped up papers that use exciting words can amount to nothing more than a paycheck and slightly useful information also. It's much too easy to fall for cheap hype. Personally, I need to see the replication studies completed and validated. That's truth...not hype, wishful thinking or having to cross your fingers. Replications must be accomplished by someone else's hands or the proposed therapy has a way of just disappearing along with the researcher that hyped it with fancy wording. Good reputable labs receive strong consistent grant support, so they are readily identified and can provide truth in concept.

    Surgery is invasive as well as injecting anything to invade the cord.

    Your best bet studies have received grant funding, but are not published yet. (It's one of the main reasons I wouldn't want to have tooth pulp cells, shark cartlilage, corrosive materials, or other preliminary theories injected into me...) For myself, I like the idea of holding out a bit longer for the really good stuff that's being worked on now. That's just my personal observations with some of the research taking place today.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 12-15-2011 at 03:10 PM.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by jhope View Post
    Grammy I read these studies and see words like" improved" or "increased" I need to see "restored" "robust" or else all these studies did was provide a paycheck and some slightly useful information...............
    One more thing. We all have had invasive surgery ie when you broke your neck. the effects are severe! a graft may damage more of you than it fixes!
    to expose that area and graft it so aggressive I believe the risk of fatality is quite high. recovery from shock and swelling may increase damage. This is not a well placed injection . This is surgery! could take years to get an idea of what happened.

    My best bet is scaffolding, pten blockers, stem cells of some type and inhibitory blockers/ neurotrophins. where's that study?

    I disagree also - Jerry Silver got nearly normal breathing function and bladder control back in rat models using chondroitinase alone in incomplete lesion and chondroitinase and peripheral nerve graft in complete lesion. See the W2W video

    That's why I would put this at the head of any hopeful therapies

    Invivotherapeutics I'm not sure about - Frank Reynolds is like a cartoon character when he talks about his accident and suddenly he recovers because he lies in bed and reads a lot about sci - something doesn't ring true - I really hope I'm wrong

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    I disagree also - Jerry Silver got nearly normal breathing function and bladder control back in rat models using chondroitinase alone in incomplete lesion and chondroitinase and peripheral nerve graft in complete lesion. See the W2W video

    That's why I would put this at the head of any hopeful therapies

    Invivotherapeutics I'm not sure about - Frank Reynolds is like a cartoon character when he talks about his accident and suddenly he recovers because he lies in bed and reads a lot about sci - something doesn't ring true - I really hope I'm wrong
    Christopher,i agree you,FRANK is a magician。

    I CAN't see the w2w video,the vedio link was not opened,
    http://www.unite2fightparalysis.org/2011_w2w_videos
    can you give me another? thanks!
    Last edited by east dragon; 12-15-2011 at 02:13 AM.

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