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Thread: Jerry Silver talks to me

  1. #11
    Senior Member NWC4's Avatar
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    Kudos Chris!

    After 30 years needed this today!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    Jerry has already been invited to present data to UCSF in the spring of 2012 hopefully with the aim of starting a clinical trial of peripheral nerve grafting, which is a relatively simple procedure but requires a team of dedicated neurosurgeons to write an IRB(?).
    Institutional Review Board (IRB). The researchers I know have always found time to take a phone call or e-mail even with a busy schedule.

    Good luck!
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post
    ..............
    At the recent Neuroscience meetings in DC, Acorda Therapeutics, International Spinal Research Trust and Susan Harkema (part of the epidural stimulator team) all met with Jerry and expressed their excitement about his results and the desire to go forward to clinical trials.
    ...
    That's a good mix of people IMO.

    If Susan Harkema helps getting chondroitinase to trials fast I can even consider not to react when the next Epi-Stim study will be publisced

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  4. #14
    I think the epi stim could be a part of the rehab as opposed to some sort of permanently implanted bionic solution - I don't know, just my thoughts

  5. #15
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Keep putting the pressure on Chris! I wanna be able to stop mid-stream and start again ... and I want my *GD* pelvic floor muscles back since I never got to exercise them as a 12yr old! I am not even kidding!
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  6. #16
    "My name is Netta Ganor and I am 20 years old. I am a c-4/5 quad from Israel. I was struck down with Acute TM on November 25th, 1994, at the age of 15. It all started one Friday afternoon, after I came back from school. After lunch, I suddenly started to feel a terrible sharp pain in my upper back (behind the shoulders). Gradually, but quite fast, in less than one hour, I lost sensation and the ability to move my hands and finally my legs. My mother immediately called an ambulance, which took me to the hospital. I was taken to the IC department and was diagnosed after 10 days with Acute TM at c-3. Of course, I was ventilated. After three months, more or less, I saw the first improvement; my left arm started to move. Gradually, in the next one and a half years, I got rid of the vent due to hard work in exercising my breathing muscles. ... Today, I still have no sensation from the shoulders down, including my arms. I move the left arm without feeling it." http://www.myelitis.org/newsletters/...tter3-2-16.htm

    jsilver, what are the chances that chondroitinase administration will revive nerve circuits and assist to reestablish synapses in Netta Ganor case? Whether the non-traumatic nature of the lesion is a good factor here?
    Comment, please, on this: "ChABC-mediated sprouting of spared fibers does not necessarily translate into functional recovery." http://acnescarremovals.blogspot.com...inase-abc.html

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    "My name is Netta Ganor and I am 20 years old. I am a c-4/5 quad from Israel. I was struck down with Acute TM on November 25th, 1994, at the age of 15. It all started one Friday afternoon, after I came back from school. After lunch, I suddenly started to feel a terrible sharp pain in my upper back (behind the shoulders). Gradually, but quite fast, in less than one hour, I lost sensation and the ability to move my hands and finally my legs. My mother immediately called an ambulance, which took me to the hospital. I was taken to the IC department and was diagnosed after 10 days with Acute TM at c-3. Of course, I was ventilated. After three months, more or less, I saw the first improvement; my left arm started to move. Gradually, in the next one and a half years, I got rid of the vent due to hard work in exercising my breathing muscles. ... Today, I still have no sensation from the shoulders down, including my arms. I move the left arm without feeling it." http://www.myelitis.org/newsletters/...tter3-2-16.htm

    jsilver, what are the chances that chondroitinase administration will revive nerve circuits and assist to reestablish synapses in Netta Ganor case? Whether the non-traumatic nature of the lesion is a good factor here?
    Comment, please, on this: "ChABC-mediated sprouting of spared fibers does not necessarily translate into functional recovery." http://acnescarremovals.blogspot.com...inase-abc.html
    Dr.Wise, how you estimate chances of your first candidate(UBC+Li) to do here what it is supposed to do? Do you agree with jsilver that for TM-caused damage repairing one is "don't need neurotransplantation", what is required is "axonal regeneration, terminal arborization/sprouting near a potential target and synapse re-formation"? I do agree, with the addition of remyelination. Dr.Wise, what task from mentioned above you assign to UBC+Li? Regarding its safety -- it is safe.

  8. #18
    Kivi ,where did you get the information on tm and what is needed for regeneration? Have you been to the Myelin Repair Foundation web site? They are working for ms cures and talk about tm.

    Anthony

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by keeping on View Post
    Kivi ,where did you get the information on tm and what is needed for regeneration? Have you been to the Myelin Repair Foundation web site? They are working for ms cures and talk about tm.
    Anthony
    Anthony, I've been to Transverse Myelitis Association website (http://www.myelitis.org/).
    The info is here:
    Quote Originally Posted by jsilver View Post
    Dear kivi66,
    I fully understand the issues involved with chronic injury and I appreciate your comments. I did mention the hurdles that need to be overcome in my post #234. However, just like after trauma both sensory and motor axons that were severed remain essentially indefinitely with dystrophic end balls at the outer edge of the penumbra of your lesion. Yes, we may need further strategies (likely neurotrophin support) to re-awaken these sleepy neurons or we may need to regulate the PTEN gene to strengthen their growth potential but they potentially could be triggered back to a growth mode. Whether they can reconnect with the neuropil beyond the lesion after many years is still unknown but we surely won't know unless we try and that is exactly what we wish to do. You don't need neurotransplantation, you need axonal regeneration, terminal arborization/sprouting near a potential target and synapse re-formation.
    Quote Originally Posted by jsilver View Post
    Dear Kivi66,
    One would need neurotransplantation (if that were possible and if the new neurons were the right type and could reconnect properly which they have a hard time doing without help) for neurodegenerative diseases that destroy neurons (for instance Parkinsons, Huntingtons, ALS or cord injuries that kill lower motor neurons). Most cord injuries spare motor neurons in vital places. The key problem that leads to paralysis after most CNS trauma as well as TM is white matter damage that involves both axotomy and demyelination. The electrical cables are cut or they have lost insulation but the neuron cell bodies DON'T DIE, they just atrophy and their severed axon tips remain in place in the white matter for decades. There is a normal, painstakingly slow plasticity that occurs above and below the lesion that can be augmented and directed with physical therapy but especially with a combination of patterned exercise and chondroitinase and sometimes well placed neurotrophins. Stem cells of a wide variety of types are extremely valuable in preventing secondary inflammatory mediated axotomy and demyelination and they can also stimulate a measure of further plasticity at least at acute stages. There is little credible evidence, thus far, that stem/progenitor cells can form bridges for axon regeneration into and most importantly back out of the lesion on the other side. There is little credible evidence that, by themselves, stem cells can restore function via regeneration or sprouting at chronic stages. The only exciting stem cell therapy that I have seen good evidence for functional restoration at sub-chronic times after SCI in a rodent model is that of Aileen Anderson and Brian Cummings. Thus, for spinal cord injury there is almost never a need for neurotransplantation. We need enhanced sprouting from spared axons and regeneration from those that are severed and it would be great if we could remyelinate the axons that have regenerated/sprouted.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    "My name is Netta Ganor and I am 20 years old. I am a c-4/5 quad from Israel. I was struck down with Acute TM on November 25th, 1994, at the age of 15. It all started one Friday afternoon, after I came back from school. After lunch, I suddenly started to feel a terrible sharp pain in my upper back (behind the shoulders). Gradually, but quite fast, in less than one hour, I lost sensation and the ability to move my hands and finally my legs. My mother immediately called an ambulance, which took me to the hospital. I was taken to the IC department and was diagnosed after 10 days with Acute TM at c-3. Of course, I was ventilated. After three months, more or less, I saw the first improvement; my left arm started to move. Gradually, in the next one and a half years, I got rid of the vent due to hard work in exercising my breathing muscles. ... Today, I still have no sensation from the shoulders down, including my arms. I move the left arm without feeling it." http://www.myelitis.org/newsletters/...tter3-2-16.htm

    jsilver, what are the chances that chondroitinase administration will revive nerve circuits and assist to reestablish synapses in Netta Ganor case? Whether the non-traumatic nature of the lesion is a good factor here?
    Comment, please, on this: "ChABC-mediated sprouting of spared fibers does not necessarily translate into functional recovery." http://acnescarremovals.blogspot.com...inase-abc.html
    jsilver, I have to admit that, if WY's replies not actually interest me, then your opinions I still would like to know. And, though
    Quote Originally Posted by jsilver View Post
    Frankly, I don't have a cord injury so I could never ever put myself in the place of all of you who do.
    I suppose that cited above story deserves some clicks on the keyboard.

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