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Thread: A First -- UCF Lab Creates Cells Used by Brain to Control Muscle Cells

  1. #1

    A First -- UCF Lab Creates Cells Used by Brain to Control Muscle Cells

    A First -- UCF Lab Creates Cells Used by Brain to Control Muscle Cells



    University of Central Florida researchers, for the first time, have used stem cells to grow neuromuscular junctions between human muscle cells and human spinal cord cells, the key connectors used by the brain to communicate and control muscles in the body.

    The success at UCF is a critical step in developing “human-on-a-chip” systems. The systems are models that recreate how organs or a series of organs function in the body. Their use could accelerate medical research and drug testing, potentially delivering life-saving breakthroughs much more quickly than the typical 10-year trajectory most drugs take now to get through animal and patient trials.

    “These types of systems have to be developed if you ever want to get to a human-on-a-chip that recreates human function,” said James Hickman, a UCF bioengineer who led the breakthrough research. “It’s taken many trials over a number of years to get this to occur using human derived stem cells.”

    Hickman’s work, funded through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health, is described in the December issue of Biomaterials.

    read...

    http://today.ucf.edu/a-first-ucf-lab...-muscle-cells/

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    A First -- UCF Lab Creates Cells Used by Brain to Control Muscle Cells



    University of Central Florida researchers, for the first time, have used stem cells to grow neuromuscular junctions between human muscle cells and human spinal cord cells, the key connectors used by the brain to communicate and control muscles in the body.

    The success at UCF is a critical step in developing “human-on-a-chip” systems. The systems are models that recreate how organs or a series of organs function in the body. Their use could accelerate medical research and drug testing, potentially delivering life-saving breakthroughs much more quickly than the typical 10-year trajectory most drugs take now to get through animal and patient trials.

    “These types of systems have to be developed if you ever want to get to a human-on-a-chip that recreates human function,” said James Hickman, a UCF bioengineer who led the breakthrough research. “It’s taken many trials over a number of years to get this to occur using human derived stem cells.”

    Hickman’s work, funded through the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health, is described in the December issue of Biomaterials.

    read...

    http://today.ucf.edu/a-first-ucf-lab...-muscle-cells/
    While I have not read this article in detail, the claim that this is the first study showing motoneurons is simply not true. Many other scientists have grown motoneurons. Wise.

  3. #3
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    Wise can these cells be used for lower spinal injuries in trials?

    Which other scientists have grown motoneurons and which cells will be most effective?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jawaid View Post
    Wise can these cells be used for lower spinal injuries in trials?

    Which other scientists have grown motoneurons and which cells will be most effective?
    Doug Kerr was the first to show that embryonic stem cells can replace monotoneurons in animals that had been infected with a virus that kills motoneurons. The replacement cells not only looked like neurons but sent axons out the spinal cord and innervated muscles. This was published nearly 8 years ago.

    Many people, including Okano in Tokyo have shown that fetal neural stem cells will create neurons that will innervate other neurons in the spinal cord and some of them look like motoneurons.

    A factor called sonic hedgehog (SHH) has been used by many people to encourage neurons to produce motoneurons. Discovered in 1978 by Eric Wieschaus and Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, SHH is not only a morphogen (i.e. it patterns neural tissue development) but also serves to guide axons. Shh concentration gradients regulate several transcription factors that are responsible for induction of motoneurons.

    This person placed cells "on-a-chip" and apparently some fo the cells are showing some of the characteristics of neurons, including ability to make neuromuscular synapses. This is far cry from showing that these cells are able to control muscles in vivo from the spinal cord. Fortunately, Kerr and Okano have gone a long ways towards showing the induction of motoneurons from transplanted neural progenitor cells in animal spinal cords.

    Wise.

  5. #5
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    Thank u dear Wise.

    I hope u might think to add that factor in ur coming trial.

    God bless you and give u success

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