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Thread: Oeg's in Brisbane Trial .

  1. #1
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Oeg's in Brisbane Trial .

    even though this is 6 months old , i posted this as one of the best explainations of the Brisbane OEG trials i have found so far. sorry again to Dr. Young , Schmeky , Pecla and other members for my misquoting regarding the use of cadavers to harvest OEG's for the trial .

    Courier Mail
    Edition 1 - First with the newsFRI 12 JUL 2002, Page 015
    Doctors follow noses to medical breakthrough
    By Gary Evans


    THE world's first clinical trial involving the transplant of nasal cells into the spinal cord of a paraplegic patient is the climax of a two-year process.
    The trial, funded by the Princess Alexandra Hospital Foundation, is a first but vital step in the search for a cure for paralysis.
    The team -- Princess Alexandra Spinal Injuries Unit head Dr Tim Geraghty, ear nose and throat specialist Dr Chris Perry and Griffith University scientists Professor Alan Mackay-Sim and Dr Francois Feron -- met about two years ago to plan the trial.
    When they decided they had progressed laboratory work at Griffith University to a degree where a clinical trial was safe, the team approached the Princess Alexandra Hospital Foundation for a grant in August 2000.
    The Foundation Research Committee, which consists of some of Queensland's most eminent researchers, considers the scientific merit of applications to ensure the proposed work is not being duplicated elsewhere in the world, and that potential outcomes can be measured.
    The ethics committees of the Princess Alexandra Hospital and Griffith University examined the proposal, and both approved the trial before the grant application was made.
    The ethics committees abide by National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines, which ensure that nothing is hidden from the patients.
    After further independent valuation from leading scientists, the Foundation Research Committee agreed to fund the project for $200,000 over two years. Most of the funds will be spent on growing the specific nasal cells from each volunteer to be transplanted into their injured spinal cords.
    The surgical and scientific team has been careful not to raise false hopes that this procedure will be an immediate cure for paralysis.
    The trial team includes social workers and a psychiatrist to help patients cope with any pressures that may arise from their voluntary participation.
    Perry harvested the nasal tissue several weeks ago at PA Hospital. A small portion of the olfactory area in the upper part of one side of the patient's nose was removed under anaesthetic. The area from which it was taken will regenerate -- it is the only area of the nervous system outside the brain which regrows.
    Mackay-Sim and Feron then grew the cells required for the transplant in a purpose-built laboratory at Griffith University.
    TESTS were conducted on the patient's sense of smell before and after the operation to confirm there was no change in the ability to taste and smell food.
    The transplant procedure involved a laminectomy performed by Princess Alexandra head of neurosurgery Dr Adrian Nowitzke and visiting specialist spinal surgeon Dr Paul Lucina.
    The surgeons opened the covering of the spinal cord near the injury. On the day of the operation, the cells were prepared in a laboratory at PA Hospital by the Griffith University scientists. As the operation progressed the cells were delivered from this laboratory in tiny lots to the surgical team. Fourteen million of the cells dissolved in two drops of fluid were transplanted to several areas of the patient's injured spinal cord.
    The cells were injected with a specially assembled surgical device developed by the team and made at Griffith University. This allowed the cells to be injected through extremely fine needles. By culturing the cells from the patient's own nose, problems of immune rejection were eliminated.
    Spinal research institutions throughout the world have recognised the value of using nasal cells for spinal cord repair. The difficulty these institutions faced was in growing cells suitable to transplant samples taken from patients' noses. This was the major breakthrough at Griffith University.
    Further funding is required for the clinical trials to move to the next level. This would see the nasal cells transplanted into the spinal cords of patients as soon as possible after their injury.
    Scientists believe these cells may assist regeneration of the spinal cord, which occurs only in the first few months after injury.
    Gary Evans is the chief executive officer of the Princess Alexandra Hospital Foundation. Money-order donations for the ongoing trial can be sent to the foundation (phone 3240 7111)

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

    [This message was edited by dogger on 01-12-03 at 23:27.]

    [This message was edited by dogger on 01-12-03 at 23:29.]

    [This message was edited by dogger on 01-12-03 at 23:49.]

  2. #2
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    THE world's first clinical trial involving the transplant of nasal cells into the spinal cord of a paraplegic patient....uh huh.

    but still better than anything usa is doing.

  3. #3
    The next step is transplant cells as soon as possible after injury - long term chronic injuries are left out again

  4. #4
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Chris2 , i disagree with you on long term chronics missing out again .i could be wrong [ i am wrong more often than right ] but i understand this trial has to prove beneficial for chronics before they will move on to acutes. the selection criteria for the trial was complete chronics so that any return could be evaluated as having been from the OEG's rather then from a regaining of function that acutes sometimes get following their injury . i can't see patients generally or insurance companies specifically agreeing to this proceedure until it is well proven . also i am sure that if my children or in your case your neice was to receive a SCI injury neither of us would want them to put up with SCI for one minute longer than is necessary . by being able to cycle acutes through hospital and rehab quickly there would be facilities and medical staff available to fix us .

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

    [This message was edited by dogger on 01-13-03 at 01:48.]

  5. #5
    DA, I don't understand your point. Would you be willing to push for a nasal mucosa transplant trial in Texas? This would certainly fit with the agenda of a number of Texans that I know from these forums. Instead of kibitzing from the sidelines, it would be very helpful if some funds could be raised for such a trial. Oh, there will also need to be volunteers. Wise.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    dr young...i was uh huh about them saying they were first.


    dr young the attitudes here about sci research stinks. i cant find anyone to do my decompression and i live within 100 miles of the worlds largest medical center and another giant in UTMB. but i will try. i'll go visit utmb soon as i can. i heard a new neurologist has taken over.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mk99's Avatar
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    DA I think you missed Dr. Young's point.

    You have a lot of drive, desire & persistance... why don't you put it to good use and push for a nasal mucosa trial in Texas? Perhaps you can write a passionate letter to your fellow Texan, Bush Junior. You can tell him that you are also very anti ESC and anti-abortion... but you want a cure and nasal mucosa is ready, safe & is A-OK with the religious right and is A-OK with you too.

    It is much easier to criticize then actually do something about a problem. I am just as guilty of this as you are... but one my my resolutions this year it to do more "doing" and less "complaining".

  8. #8
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    [B]USA Nasal Mucosa Human Clinical Trial[

    I am behind this all the way, but have a few questions.

    1 - I was under the impression Will Ambler is working towards this objective (?)

    2 - I know an excellent surgeon (not neuro) in Louisiana that I might be able to persuade to do an OEG with little or no fees. Does this have to be done by a neurosurgeon?

    3 - No one would be willing to perform this procedure unless a qualified Dr. has issued a report (hey DA, here's that "book" thing) from Lima, Sim-McKay (dogger), or Huang. Any idea when this may occur?

    I will throw my hat in the ring to get a USA based nasal mucosa human trial under way. Dr. Y, could you provide a summary outline of the proper steps necessary to get this moving? Do you think this could happen as soon as 2004?

  9. #9
    Schmeky, publications are important. In this forum, you have had the benefit of a lot of insights into the trials that are being done overseas. Most of the clinicians in the field have not had access to this information. Unpublished results are not a good idea. There is much confusion, unconfirmed anecdotal reports, and partial information on recovery. Data on 1-year followup neurological examinations and complications would be essential for rational clinical trial planning. However, it is not too early to start raising money for and planning a clinical trial. If there is any plans to apply for a grant from NIH to fund a multicenter trial, a huge amount of work needs to be done. Believe me, I have gone through this several times. The money issue is not trivial. By the way, the expense of a clinical trial does not come from the surgeon. Most of it is due to the hospitalization costs. Wise.

  10. #10
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Schmeky , i understand it will be 3 years from the start of the Brisbane trial [jul 02 ] until results are published.

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

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