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Thread: UC Irvine - hav we all seen this one?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Yant View Post
    Neurons are not susceptible to cancer-like growth. Glial cells are what causes brain cancer. pTEN inhibition causes the axons to regenerate from the neuron cell body.

    Dr. He is moving to UC Berkeley, not UCSD. Dr. He is not moving to California because of the better research environment for stem cells in California.
    Thank you Bob for providing these info.

    So now I wonder how would be possible to inhibit PTEN just in the neurons?

    I guess they are working on that..

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Yant View Post
    Neurons are not susceptible to cancer-like growth. Glial cells are what causes brain cancer. pTEN inhibition causes the axons to regenerate from the neuron cell body.

    Dr. He is moving to UC Berkeley, not UCSD. Dr. He is not moving to California because of the better research environment for stem cells in California.
    Whoops, just had heard that from a post doc that is in the same Dept, guess his info was less than accurate. What is your connection w/ Dr. He?

    Neruons do form tumors, just not very common (abt 1%)... central nerocytoma, gangliocytoma, dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma, ganglioglioma, desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, ganglioneuroma... but then again, a pten deletion/inhibition is not very common either, so who knows what will happen after a few years post-treatment. On a good note- neuronal tumors are much more treatable than gliomas, often just require surgery... but if it is unresectable, still not good.
    Last edited by dr.zapp; 11-19-2011 at 11:32 PM.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mamadavid View Post
    The article seems to be more than a year old, yet it appears on the November 17 issue. Has anyone heard any more recent news about it?
    Dr. He is the senior author on a paper published by my former graduate student Kai Liu, who showed that knocking out PTEN in mice strongly stimulates corticospinal tract regeneration. This study showed that the importance of genetic control of growth. CNS axons of course once grew during development but genetic stimulation of such growth turns off during development. It seems that PTEN is part of the mechanisms that stops axonal growth, acting through downstream mechanisms such as mTOR.

    This is the first time that I have heard STAT3 being proposed to be a major factor. We recently published a paper in PLOS ONE, showing the lithium inhibits astrogliogenesis by inhibiting STAT3. Of course, lithium stimulates regeneration of spinal tracts probably by stimulating NFAT and WNT/beta-catenin. There are some suggestions that lithium also acts by up regulating mTOR but all these still need to be studied. The reason why we are using lithium is because it facilitates regeneration and neurotrophin production by stem cells.

    Dr. He is moving from Harvard to UC Berkeley. He will be doing so in January. It is s significant loss to Harvard and a great addition to Berkeley.

    Wise.

  4. #14
    Junior Member
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    Last week Zhigang He had an article published in Nature online, showing that blocking both SOCS3 and pTEN led to a ten fold regeneration in the optic nerve compared to pTEN inhibition alone.

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...ture10594.html

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