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Thread: What is your contingency plan???

  1. #1

    What is your contingency plan???

    This is a question that was inspired by the thread "Should a spouse or partner be a primary caregiver?"

    I think this is the number one nightmare of caregivers. Those of us who are sole or primary caregivers can get sick, need surgery, get hurt in an accident, or need time away from home to visit a sick parent or attend a funeral. However, if we do all the caregiving and don't have a relationship with any personal assistants, what do we do when we can't perform our tasks including running the household?

    If you know something is coming up, of course, you can take time to plan. But even with advanced planning, how do you hire full time care for several weeks or a couple months? What happens in the case of an emergency, when you need a full time caregiver right away? How do you find full time help for the short term?

    How do you plan to arrange for care for you spouse or partner?

    NL (GJ's wife and caregiver)

  2. #2
    I worry about this often.

  3. #3
    I do to! Jim carries the phone number of a PCA that helps out every year or two when I leave for a week-end. He would try to call her to help out in an emergency. One of Jim's best friends is an LPN so I think he would call Rick if Sophia wasn't available but Rick hasn't done his cares in over 20 years. I worry about this a lot.

  4. #4
    Usually I have to fill in, and take off work to do it (since my mother lives 120 miles from me). This has been primarily when her main PCA (who lives in) has been ill, or one time when she broke her foot, I had to do it for two weeks, and then my sister flew in from out of state and did two more weeks.

    We have a couple of people who can pitch in for an evening shift (less involved care) in her neighborhood who I have trained, and we have considered recruiting and training just a "back-up" person who could be on-call for emergencies, but have not done that yet. I have asked a couple people who we interviewed and liked but did not hire if they would consider being called for something like this in the future, and I may follow up on that.

    Some people identify a nursing agency to use as a back-up for emergencies, but this can run into a lot of $$.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member TomRL's Avatar
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    Mrs Tom had a stroke earlier this month. I had a contract signed with an agency for backup, but they took a while to start. Family filled the gaps, but it has been expensive.
    Tom

    "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

  6. #6
    Senior Member Van Quad's Avatar
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    Good question NL. There is a fine balance between having enough trained people and supplying them with enough work to keep them interested.

  7. #7
    I was Debbie's aide as well as her partner. At the time I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, she had days where she could fend for herself for a few hours, and days she couldn't so well, and of course there was no way of telling when she might become ill, get stuck somehow or some other crisis arise. I only had 3 days from my diagnosis to surgery -not enough time for our agency to find people to cover my hours. While I was in the hospital she had an aide for a couple hours in the morning, then was alone until a friend came over every evening and stayed with her through the evening and overnight. This still left about 8 hours a day that Debbie was totally alone. I knew she was in danger and though my doc had told me I'd be in the hospital at least 5 days if not longer, I busted my hump to get better and was able to get home in 3 days. Recovering from major surgery or not, at least at home there were things I could do for Debbie. If all else failed, I could call 911 if nothing else. The agency never did get the hours covered until an independent aide was approved to come in and then we had more help but that took two weeks. I never have forgiven my agency for not trying harder to get someone here more.
    Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
    - Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by TomRL View Post
    Mrs Tom had a stroke earlier this month. I had a contract signed with an agency for backup, but they took a while to start. Family filled the gaps, but it has been expensive.
    I'm sorry to hear this. I hope things are going better now.

  9. #9
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    I wish I knew the answer to this....with us the MS society says they have respite care but when I called about it they have to know in advance. I know our daughters could help out more if something serious happened but then there is still certain things they could not do.

  10. #10
    Actually, during all of the storms and tornado warnings this summer we were hoping to be blown to OZ where all of those friendly little people would help us.
    Does that count?

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