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Thread: C.Reeve is coming to Australia.

  1. #21
    Originally posted by mkowalski99:

    let me take a wild guess here:

    Furthermore, the thought of CR coming and talking about a cure means instead of people admiring how much Mr. Heath and others like him have accomplished and how full their lives are, CR comes and get's all that attention. It must infuriate some of these SCI lovers that society still thinks a "cure" for disability is a good idea, etc, etc.

    Excuse me while I throw up.
    You said it, check this crap "motovational speaker"

  2. #22
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    I'm a carer, not a person with SCI and I haven't posted on this particular board before, so I apologise in advance if I'm out of order.
    Mr. Heath has been SCI'd for 2 or 3 decades and thinks that even if a cure is possible, it won't benefit him. Therefore the vast majority of SCI money should go to only one thing: The bottomless pit called Care spending. Even if we pave the world flat, remove all stairs, come up with singing catheters and make ABs feel jealous because they are missing out on bowel treatment programs, it is never ever enough. A 99:1 ratio of care:cure spending is not enough. NOTHING IS EVER ENOUGH.
    My feeling about this is that many disabled people are concerned that all funds will be directed towards a cure, which is still a long way off. People (particularly the able bodied) see Christopher Reeve talking about a cure and they think it's just around the corner. They wonder why their taxes are being 'wasted' on those who really only have to be patient for a little while longer.

    My husband has been disabled for 25 years and so he certainly won't be able to benefit from a cure - whenever it arrives. Does that mean he should continue to suffer in pain, since he can't get even two hours physiotherapy a week?

    Working towards a cure is certainly important, but so are the lives of people who are disabled NOW.

    I know a woman who constantly states that Christopher Reeve has made such wonderful progress (why hasn't my husband made the same progress is the hidden question) and that he will be walking "soon". Nothing will dissuade her from this view. Consequently, anyone who is disabled and is unlikely to walk "soon", simply isn't trying hard enough. She doesn't actually come right out and say this, of course, but it's obvious what's meant.

  3. #23
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    dougm....puuuuuuuuuulease.
    if mr heath was king of the world he would end all sci research and jail the researchers. this caveman mentality man is bitter and wants to drag us all down with him. if care is so important, why haven't he fixed the care issues?
    sci is not new? he had plenty of years and decades to fix the care issues?
    he hasn't and never will. you can't expect a loser to be a winner. this goes for all forum members who support this clown.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    Jools

    I've been paralysed close to twenty-three years and I fully plan on benefitting from a cure when it becomes available.

    What do you think precludes your husband from benefitting? Muscle atrophy? Osteoporosis?

    Even if he regained only bowel, bladder and sex function a therapy would be life-changing and possibly life-saving. But therapies have the potential to restore even more. It is slow going right now but worth every cent of investment.

    Research dollars amount to less than 1% of the amount spent on care. There is little chance that increases in spending on research will negatively impact anyone's care. And in the long run they will greatly improve care as cure is its greatest form.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  5. #25
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    jools...you say cure is long way off. do you have a crystal ball that says 100% the cure is long way off? many ppl are benefiting from first generation cure today. how can it be a long way off when it's first generation exist today. what is wrong with you?


    did your crystal ball say your husband will never benefit? even if your husband legs was amputated and he never walk, a cure will at least improve bladder/bowel. i call that benefitting. again, what is wrong with you?



    25 years...why did you wait 25 years to look for better care? huh what? you didn't wait 25 years. you've been fighting for 25 years and yet your care still sucks. SO WHAT DOES THAT TELL YOU?

  6. #26
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    OK, Jeff and DA. As I said, I'm only a carer. Sorry to butt in.

  7. #27
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    no no jools. butt in as much as you want. i encourage you. this is the way you learn.

  8. #28
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    jools...you say cure is long way off. do you have a crystal ball that says 100% the cure is long way off? many ppl are benefiting from first generation cure today. how can it be a long way off when it's first generation exist today. what is wrong with you?


    did your crystal ball say your husband will never benefit? even if your husband legs was amputated and he never walk, a cure will at least improve bladder/bowel. i call that benefitting. again, what is wrong with you?



    25 years...why did you wait 25 years to look for better care? huh what? you didn't wait 25 years. you've been fighting for 25 years and yet your care still sucks. SO WHAT DOES THAT TELL YOU?
    Firstly, what's 'wrong' with me is that I simply posted an opinion that many disabled people feel that funding (such as it is) will be directed away from the current needs of disabled people.

    Secondly, you're right. I don't know when a cure will come and neither do you but it doesn't appear to be just around the corner, so in the meantime those who are disabled still need help.

    Thirdly, I have been his sole carer for 25 years. He has needed physiotherapy recently (NOT for 25 years) which he has been denied because he's not a 'new' quad in rehab.

  9. #29
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    jools....good, speak your mind. i like that.

    "Secondly, you're right. I don't know when a cure will come and neither do you but it doesn't appear to be just around the corner, so in the meantime those who are disabled still need help."

    jools, ofcourse its not around the corner because it is here. ppl are benefiting as i type now. its not perfect, YET, but neither was the first computer.


    "Thirdly, I have been his sole carer for 25 years. He has needed physiotherapy recently (NOT for 25 years) which he has been denied because he's not a 'new' quad in rehab"

    reguardless, why haven't the issue been dealt with before? he is not the first to have such problems.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Groups unimpressed by Reeve visit

    Groups unimpressed by Reeve visit


    Disability groups are unimpressed by a taxpayer-funded visit by Superman star Christopher Reeve for a medical conference next month.

    The actor, who was paralysed in a freak horseriding accident seven years ago, will speak at the NSW premier's spinal injury forum and at a fundraising dinner for a research institute.

    NSW taxpayers will foot a $135,000 bill for the visit - but Premier Bob Carr cannot say what the sum covers.

    Travel is being donated by Qantas, which is converting the first class section of one of its jets into a makeshift medical ward.

    For Mr Carr, a passionate advocate of embryonic stem cell research, the visit by the famous actor is a coup.




    Reeve will actively promote the benefits of such research.

    The Physical Disability Council of NSW said the January forum had surprised people with disabilities, who wondered how the conference addresses current needs.

    The council said at most 10,000 people in Australia live with a spinal cord injury while 1.5 million have a physical disability.

    Waiting lists for services were lengthy and housing and transport inaccessible.

    "We are not opposed to medical research and we welcome any overseas visitor with disability to NSW," council president David Brice said.

    "But none of us can escape the realities of how life is today for many people with disability in the towns and cities of NSW."

    Mr Carr defended the visit, saying the conference agenda was broader than discussion on stem cell research, adding Reeve would provide a huge fundraising boost for Australian researchers.

    "We spend $658 million a year on disability services," Mr Carr said.

    "The proportion of our disability budget that is represented by the money, the $135,000 Australian that the Premier's Department is contributing here, is one 50th of one per cent.

    "The money raised for research into spinal injury will vastly outweigh this relatively modest commitment the government is making here."

    Mr Carr said he was puzzled by criticism of the visit.

    "There is obviously within the lobby something of a difference in emphasis between those who give a strong weighting to research and those who give a strong weighting to care," he said.

    "My argument is you can have both."

    Joanna Knott, head of the Australasian Spinal Research Trust, said having Reeve in person would do far more than a teleconference appearance.

    "Christopher Reeve is an incredible, influential figure ... and I think a visit here will make tremendous difference to people with spinal cord injuries and all sorts of disabilities."



    ©AAP 2002

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