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Thread: Combining Schwann cell bridges and olfactory-ensheathing glia grafts with chondroitin

  1. #11
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    Money - how they can make the most profit from this.

    How is that not trying to say that people are holding condroitinase back for financial reasons?
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  2. #12
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    it's unfounded speculation
    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


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  3. #13
    Christopher - the paper you cite is a collobaration between The Miami Project, University of Alberta and the Schwabb lab in Switzerland. My understanding is that the research is ongoing and The Miami Project is excited about it's possibility for chronics as they move forward with their human trials. I also know that they are researching other drugs that have shown good results in dissolving scar tissue.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by LetsGo View Post
    Christopher - the paper you cite is a collobaration between The Miami Project, University of Alberta and the Schwabb lab in Switzerland. My understanding is that the research is ongoing and The Miami Project is excited about it's possibility for chronics as they move forward with their human trials. I also know that they are researching other drugs that have shown good results in dissolving scar tissue.
    unfortunately I have been told that the outcome of the trial Miami Project is about to start won't be available to the clinic for at least 10 to 15 years, which is the same old story really - everything is 10 or more years away and then it never materializes anyway

    oneday something must actually work..............and SOON I hope

  5. #15
    I understand everyone's frustration with hearing the "in 5 years" but every organization is in the same situation not just The Miami Project. It is the process it takes to translate the science from the lab to benchside. I feel for the scientists in someways because I always hear them say they don't want to give a timeframe for when the research could be translated to care. Then people get mad because they don't give them a timeframe and keep at them until they do. They usually say in the best case scenario but science never works in the best case scenario.

    From what I've been told, The Miami Project has been working with the FDA for 4 or 5 years on this trial. Every time they think they can submit their IND, the FDA comes back with additional questions. Every question they raise requires almost 1 year's worth of research and evalutaion to get back to the FDA and costs them on average of an additional $1 million in expenses. Everyone talks about all the money that The Miami Project raises but no one looks at how expensive it is to take something to actual trial.

    How many other research organization have successful gone to trial in regeneration? No one. I'm venting a little Christopher and I apologize. I'm just frustrated reading all these other posts in this forum and lack of people applying the same criteria of evaluation equally to other organizations. Also, I think this community forgets that when scientific and medical community needed to understand the biology of the central nervous system and how it all works before the field could even be where it is today. All those years of "wasted research" by The Miami Project (but not of any other organization) was basic science needed just to understand the neverous system and brain. For example, scientits had to understand why the body would attack new neurons growing from the site of injury, the process of program cell death and when and how to turn it off and on. No cure can be found until you understand how the body works which has taken the past 20+ years to get to.

    Even today, the scientiifc community doesn't fully understand the biology of the body. People criticize all the years worth of research that was needed as well as the advances needed in scientific equipment just to get where the field is today lacks a real understanding of scientific research in general. I wish these people would go and study every other disease and step back from their anger to see how quickly this field has progressed in such little time compared to other diseases.

    Sorry for my rant. It wasn't personal to you.
    Last edited by LetsGo; 11-07-2011 at 01:19 AM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by LetsGo View Post
    I understand everyone's frustration with hearing the "in 5 years" but every organization is in the same situation not just The Miami Project. It is the process it takes to translate the science from the lab to benchside. I feel for the scientists in someways because I always hear them say they don't want to give a timeframe for when the research could be translated to care. Then people get made because they don't give them a timeframe and keep at them until they do. They usually say in the best case scenario but science never works in the best case scenario.

    From what I've been told, The Miami Project has been working with the FDA for 4 or 5 years on this trial. Everything they think they can submit their IND, the FDA comes back with additional questions. Every question they raise requires almost 1 year's worth of research and evalutaion to get back to the FDA and costs them on average of an additional $1 million in expenses. Everyone talks about all the money that The Miami Project raises but no one looks at how expensive it is to take something to actual trial.

    How many other research organization have successful gone to trial in regeneration? No one. I'm venting a little Christopher and I apologize. I'm just frustrated reading all these other posts in this forum and lack of people applying the same criteria of evaluation equally to other organizations. Also, I think this community forgets that when scientific and medical community needed to understand the biology of the central nervous system and how it all works before the field could even be where it is today. All those years of "wasted research" by The Miami Project (but not of any other organization) was basic science needed just to understand the neverous system and brain. Even today, the scientiifc community doesn't fully understand the biology of the body. People criticize all the years worth of research that was needed as well as the advances needed in scientific equipment just to get where the field is today lacks a real understanding of scientific research in general. I wish these people would go and study every other disease and step back from their anger to see how quickly this field has progressed in such little time compared to other diseases.

    Sorry for my rant. It wasn't personal to you.
    Well, yes, one senses that there is a real feeling of hope amongst some scientists about spinal cord injury and it's important for human trials to be done to see the hope realized.

    The trials I see being done are Wise's ChinaSCINet, Miami Project, Geron, The Brazilian one and StemsInc? is that the name?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Paddon View Post

    The trials I see being done are Wise's ChinaSCINet, Miami Project, Geron, The Brazilian one and StemsInc? is that the name?
    Geron just halted enrollment in theirs. It sounds like they would hand it off to any willing investor group with high quality research qualifications.

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