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Thread: Stem cells used to treat MND

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Stem cells used to treat MND

    Stem cells used to treat MND
    November ,
    Doctors have successfully implanted adult stem cells into the spinal cords of patients with Motor Neuron Disease (MND) as the first step in what may be a cure for the usually terminal disease, it was announced at a medical conference on Monday.
    The procedure, carried out on seven Italian patients, proved to be safe and well tolerated, Italian researcher Doctor Letizia Mazzini told the 13th International Symposium on Motor Neuron Disease in Melbourne.

    No major side-effects
    During the procedure, healthy stem cells were taken from the bodies of the patients.

    The cells were then multiplied and implanted in the patients' surgically opened spinal cords without any major side effects, Mazzini said.

    Possible future cure
    A leading Australian MND expert, professor Perry Bartlett, said the trial was a potential first step in the use of stem cell therapy to treat and possibly one day cure MND, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

    "It shows that if stem cells are injected in they don't cause any harm," Prof Bartlett said. "It's the first step along the way in terms of therapy."

    Slowly causing respiratory failure
    MND is a rapidly progressing and fatal disease that can strike at any time, but occurs mainly between the ages of 40-70.

    The cause is unknown, although in 10 percent of cases, it is genetic.

    MND affects the nerve cells, or motor neurons, in the brain and spinal cord, causing their gradual death and resulting in immobility and eventual respiratory failure.

    The intellect and senses remain unaffected.

    Finding a way to replace destroyed cells
    Bartlett said Australian efforts in the battle against MND were currently focused on finding ways to drive existing cells in the brain and spinal cord to replace those destroyed by the disease.

    His team hoped to find a drug which would stimulate the production of new nerve cells in the central nervous system, he added.

    This would eliminate the need for invasive surgery, remove the problem of rejection and bypass the ethical minefield that was stem cell research.

    Another option for MND could involve changing the environment in which the neurons existed to prevent them dying, either by injecting cells from other parts of the body or with a medicine.

    "We may not have to physically replace the neurons, we may be able to actually change the environment," he said. - (Sapa)
    Other news





    http://www.health24.co.za/news.asp?a...ontentID=20004

  2. #2
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    I wonder

    when this would happen with sci?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Hope for a cruel killer

    Hope for a cruel killer
    November 19 2002



    Doctors have successfully implanted adult stem cells into the spinal cords of patients with motor neurone disease, a medical conference was told yesterday.

    The procedure, carried out on seven Italian patients, proved to be safe and well tolerated, Italian researcher Letizia Mazzini told the 13th International Symposium on Motor Neurone Disease in Melbourne.

    Healthy stem cells were taken from the bodies of the patients. The cells were then multiplied and implanted in the patients' spinal cords without any major side effects, Dr Mazzini said.

    Professor Perry Bartlett, an Australian expert on motor neurone disease, said the trial was a potential first step in the use of stem cell therapy to treat and possibly cure the disease one day.

    Motor neurone disease is a rapidly progressing and fatal illness that can strike at any time, but occurs mainly between the ages of 40 and 70. The cause is unknown, although in 10 per cent of cases it is genetic.

    It affects the nerve cells, or motor neurones, in the brain and spinal cord, causing their gradual death and resulting in immobility and eventual respiratory failure. The intellect and senses remain unaffected.

    Professor Bartlett said Australian efforts were currently focused on finding ways to drive existing cells in the brain and spinal cord to replace those destroyed by the disease.

    He said his team hoped to find a drug which would stimulate the production of new nerve cells in the central nervous system.

    This would eliminate the need for invasive surgery, remove the problem of rejection and bypass the ethical minefield that was stem cell research.

    Another option for motor neurone disease could involve changing the environment in which the neurones existed to prevent them dying, either by injecting cells from other parts of the body or with a medicine.

    "We may not have to physically replace the neurones, we may be able to actually change the environment," he said.

    The Motor Neurone Disease Association of Australia welcomed the Italian trial, saying it should provide a source of optimism for the 1500 Australians with the disease.

    AAP

  4. #4
    A question.
    What does MND article refer to?
    Perhaps to Multi-center clinical trial for ALS in Italy,mentioned in a James Kelly's post?
    If so,why do we not try to put our trust in him,any time?
    Good,go on like that,James!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Blu

    I think mnd (motor neurone desease) is different from ALS

    And I can't get why should I put all my trust in Jim(James)-or whatever he is., just because there is clinic in Italy & he happen to mention it in one of his "Iknowitall" posts?

  6. #6
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    Dear Blu:

    Thank you for your open-minded consideration! You are perfectly correct. The motor neuron disease (MND) in question is ALS, although the study is also testing the safety of adult bone marrow stem cell implants for SCI. I received the following letter earlier this year from the source of the report quoted above:

    "Thank you very much for your letter. I am involved from many years in the ALS clinical research and at this moment I think that stem cell treatment represent, for the first time, a very promizing therapy for these patients. The first objective of this study is to define the safety and tolerability of ex vivo expansion of autologous mesenchymal stem cells and of a model for transplanting stem cells directly into the surgically-exposed spinal cord.

    "Our laboratory is involved from many years in ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of young patients with hematological cancers. Moreover it is involved in ex vivo expansion, typization of mesenchymal stem cells obtained from iliac crest bone marrow. In this field we are working with several growth factors in order to study the differentiation of these stem cells.

    "You can found in attachment a copy of the abstract of the project concerning ALS patients. For more details on stem cells procedures and infants with spinal cord injury, please contact dr. Fagioli Franca is the head of the transplant unit and dr. Lorenzo Genitori who is the neurosurgeon at the children's #8217 Hospital.

    "At this time we have treated only 4 ALS patients and 1 infant with neonatal cervical myelitis without significant adverse events. The follow up is too short to speculate about the effects on the natural history of the disease. I am very interested to a collaboration with clinical researchers involved in stem cell projects for neurodegenerative diseases.

    "Dr. Letizia Mazzini, Dept of Neurology, #8220; San Giovanni Bosco #8221; Hospital Largo Donatore di Sangue 3. 10154 Torino. Italia"

    Thank you, Blu, for considering that the information I present may be accurate and I may have valid reasons for taking the positions I do. Interestingly, at the New York Academy of Sciences Christopher Reeve claimed the "only hope" for curing ALS lay in ESCs. When told of this clinical trial taking place in Italy he said he didn't believe it.

    James Kelly

    [This message was edited by James Kelly on Nov 19, 2002 at 02:52 PM.]

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