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Thread: Working2Walk 2011 features Dr. Jerry Silver!

  1. #1

    Exclamation Working2Walk 2011 features Dr. Jerry Silver!

    Dr. Jerry Silver from Case Western Reserve University talks to us about his nerve grafts for restored breathing and bladder function using Chondroitinase (chABC) commonly known as the Ch'ase enzyme.

    This new strategy shows clearly, for the first time, that long distance regeneration, with appropriate re-formation of functional connections, can be achieved in the adult after spinal cord injury! ROBUST FUNCTIONAL REGENERATION BEYOND THE GLIAL SCAR



    http://www.unite2fightparalysis.org/video_library

    Last edited by GRAMMY; 10-27-2011 at 09:33 PM.

  2. #2
    Interesting....

  3. #3
    very good presentation.

  4. #4
    We have to rely on Acorda to release this enzyme

  5. #5
    Here are 2 of the articles that were published about it this past summer.

    http://www.cleveland.com/science/ind..._use_expe.html

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-14139204

    I still kinda feel bad about the rats having to be paralyzed 2 times. Their breathing is restored with the nerve graft and shot of Chase, but then the perfectly working graft had to be cut in two in order to prove that the graft had indeed been working, so they end up paralyzed a second time. Ewwww!
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 10-27-2011 at 10:43 PM.

  6. #6
    "Silver speculates the months-long delay between treatment and the return of regular breathing may be because the regenerating axons need time to build up the necessary insulation. Or it might take a while for the nerve fibers to make proper connections." (http://www.cleveland.com/science/ind..._use_expe.html)

    jsilver, does it mean that remyelinetion occurs spontaneously, without any additional "tricks"? If so, it's just amazing.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by kivi66 View Post
    "Silver speculates the months-long delay between treatment and the return of regular breathing may be because the regenerating axons need time to build up the necessary insulation. Or it might take a while for the nerve fibers to make proper connections." (http://www.cleveland.com/science/ind..._use_expe.html)

    jsilver, does it mean that remyelinetion occurs spontaneously, without any additional "tricks"? If so, it's just amazing.
    The nerve bridge contains Schwann cells which can re-myelinate spontaneously, although this undoubtedly takes some time. Re-myelination is critical to proper function of regenerated axons and this property of Schwann cells is one of the major reasons (among others) we chose the peripheral nerve autograft strategy. Np additional tricks are needed.

  8. #8
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    Dr. Silver your work and progress is very exciting and promising...Keep up the good work

    This question has probably already been asked and I maybe jumping the gun but what is the next step to get the translational work done and get this therapy to the clinic?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjames View Post
    Dr. Silver your work and progress is very exciting and promising...Keep up the good work

    This question has probably already been asked and I maybe jumping the gun but what is the next step to get the translational work done and get this therapy to the clinic?


    I second that question
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by rjames View Post
    Dr. Silver your work and progress is very exciting and promising...Keep up the good work

    This question has probably already been asked and I maybe jumping the gun but what is the next step to get the translational work done and get this therapy to the clinic?

    If you watched the video, you saw and heard 2 more important pieces of the puzzle. the most important is the very last bit where we show a strong return of function in the respiratory system in animals that had sustaing a cord lesion 1 year earlier. Recovery occurs rapidly (within 1 week) with a single injection of enzyme. Importantly the return of function at chronic time points is even stronger than the effect we see at acute stages. If you're interested we can begin to discuss various experiments that we have done which have helped us to begin to understand why this should be. the results are very exciting and are relevant to all treatments (including the use of stem cells) that target chronic injury. Hopefully , this new work will strongly stimulate Acorda to get going with a chondroitinase clinical trial. Secondly, I showed new work where we completely transected the cord and built a bridge across the gap. here we focused on the return of bladder function that continued to improve nicely at around 6 months following treatment. In the case of complete transection injuries we need to build a bridge and our new work shows that for the urinary system, at least, we can surely restore a good measure of function. By the way If you look carefully at one of the slides you may notice that I also describe a nice improvement in locomotor function in these same animals from a BBB score of 2 to a score of 7, a 5 point increase. However, I need to stress that a score of 7 is far from normal walking but there is improvement (I didn't stress walking in my talk) Thus, if we wait long enough regenerating axons can travel relatively long distances in the spinal cord and hook up synaptically to restore certain critical functions. I'm hoping that a courageous team of neurosurgeons in our country joins me in attempting a clinical trial in people with cord injuries below the respiratory nuclei. They have been hesitant to move forward with a bridge building + ch'ase clinical trial in people with very high injuries for fear of doing more damage. There's is not much left working is high quads. By the way Henrich Cheng in Taiwan has already attempted many such surgeries in humans so this procedure is certainly feasible in humans. He has yet to combine bridging +ch'ase.

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