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Thread: Quadriplegic knife & cutting board set up

  1. #1

    Quadriplegic knife & cutting board set up

    My dad and I just finished working on this so that I could start cooking with my wife. I use a cuff that supports my wrist and allows me to slip right over the end of the knife onto the flat piece of metal that is attached to the handle.

    What's special about this set up is that it not only allows me to chop, but allows me to slice with a forward and/or backward motion. I find this important all the time, especially when trying to cut up herbs. The knife hangs from the rod and can be slid from one side of the cutting board to the other. This makes for very flexible cutting service and allows for some interesting techniques.

    It's easy, comfortable, and most of all, safe. I hope this helps other quads to get working in the kitchen!
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    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  2. #2
    Senior Member wtf's Avatar
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    I like your set-up, but how do you wash the cutting board and knife. I guess you put the whole thing in the sink?

  3. #3
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    id love one of those.

  4. #4
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    id be worried about food particles collecting under the nut and plate attatched to the knife, and maybe causing food poisoning.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by wtf View Post
    I like your set-up, but how do you wash the cutting board and knife. I guess you put the whole thing in the sink?
    Yes, I just put it under the faucet and then wipe it dry.
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    id be worried about food particles collecting under the nut and plate attatched to the knife, and maybe causing food poisoning.
    To be honest, it's not something I particularly thought about. I don't think it's a problem. If things do start to get dirty and they can't be cleaned by putting it under the faucet and washing, The whole assembly can be undone and the parts can be cleaned individually.

    Most of the cutting action occurs closer to the handle and food does not make it forward so at this point I think it is not an issue.
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  7. #7
    I should add that I have since added a collecting container next to the cutting board that I push the food into. That way it doesn't collect on the cutting board itself like depicted in the picture above.
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  8. #8
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    I was trying to come up with something like that for myself.
    it is impressive.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    I was trying to come up with something like that for myself.
    it is impressive.
    Well I can tell you it works, so get making one!

    A couple tips:

    • Use a thick cutting board that is rather heavy so that it doesn't slip around.
    • Use a chefs style knife.
    • Use aluminum for the metal parts because it's easier to work with.
    • Use nuts and bolts so that you can disassemble everything and make needed adjustments.


    I got the cutting board at home goods, The knife at Bed Bath and Beyond, and the aluminum parts at Loews.
    C5 injury with partial C6 function on left.

  10. #10
    Clever set up! It's cool that you can cook WITH your wife now.

    However for me, that looks too restrictive and limited to certain motions. While providing good support for the blade and helping the knife stay level, I often need to turn and twist at slight angles, given my wrist and the way I need to apply pressure due to no pecs on cutting arm, which forces arm/elbow to raise and hold at different angles to get best/most function. My biggest issue is the lack of strength to cut down onto large items, for example a cantaloupe, so I need both arms/hands to apply pressure, mainly using the front part of the blade.
    I d use a large blade to cut large items into more manageable sections, then use a sharp serrated steak knife to cut most things (from foods to packaging).

    How would you cut into large, hard/firm surfaced items with your setup?

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