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Thread: Actor Reeve meets with McGreevey

  1. #1
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    Actor Reeve meets with McGreevey

    Actor Reeve meets with McGreevey




    TOM BALDWIN, Chief Political Writer September 28, 2002




    Actor Christopher Reeve came home to Princeton yesterday to help Gov. Jim McGreevey duel with the federal government over stem-cell research that may free Reeve and millions of others from their wheelchairs.
    "New Jersey is going to be leading the way," said Reeve, who lost virtually all mobility in a horseback accident in 1995.

    "To hear the governor will already support the legislation is how we are going to get the job done," Reeve told reporters at Drumthwacket, the state's gubernatorial mansion.

    McGreevey is stepping out in front to support legislation in New Jersey that enables stem-cell research despite objections from the Bush administration, the Catholic Church and right-wing Republicans.

    Reeve grew up in Princeton, saying he moved there at age 3.

    Reeve, who was joined by his wife, Dana, and McGreevey's wife, Dina, began acting at McCarter Theater, just blocks from Drumthwacket.

    He worked backstage, "and worked my way onto the stage," he said.

    The proposed New Jersey law would enable private research and government funding to combine in the stem-cell research.

    The work is considered vital by most scientists to conquering diseases and crippling wounds and injuries.

    "Christopher Reeve has put a human face on the spinal cord injury," said McGreevey.

    "He has also inspired countless others living with paralysis and motivated scientists around the world."

    Stem-cell research can involve using embryonic and other human tissue to defeat paralysis, cancers and an array of other afflictions.

    New Jersey's research is underway at Rutgers, the state university credited with developing modern treatments for spinal crippling.

    "If the wind could blow my troubles away. I'd stand in front of a hurricane."

  2. #2
    Jeremy, Could you tell me what the source for this was? Was it on the TV news, or a newspaper? Thanks!

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Jeremy's Avatar
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    Marmalady: I found it on the internet at the Trentonian, at this link

    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...id=44551&rfi=6

    "If the wind could blow my troubles away. I'd stand in front of a hurricane."

  4. #4
    Thanks, Jeremy!

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    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    jeremy-thanks

    <"Christopher Reeve has put a human face on the spinal cord injury," said McGreevey.>


    Very funny---So all of us are just "monkey faces" on sci?

    ==============================
    "It was once written "To thine own self be true". But how do we know who we really are? Every man must confront the monster within himself, if he is ever to find peace without. .." Outer Limits(Monster)



  6. #6
    Thanks Jeremy.

    Go NJ!

    Onward and Upward!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Governor supports state legislation to encourage all forms of stem-cell research

    Governor supports state legislation to encourage all forms of stem-cell research

    With a wealth of private and public research facilities, New Jersey could become a leader in embryonic stem-cell research, which many scientists believe could lead to cures for spinal-cord injuries and Alzheimer's disease, said Gov. James E. McGreevey and actor Christopher Reeve at a news conference Friday.
    Gov. McGreevey threw his support behind state legislation to endorse and set up mechanisms to encourage all stem-cell research, including the controversial collection of embryonic cells - a measure similar to a recently enacted law in California. The measure would allow state funding of stem-cell research.
    "Christopher Reeve has put a human face on the spinal-cord injury," said Gov. McGreevey.
    The governor and his wife, Dina, joined Mr. Reeve and his wife, Dana, for the news conference at Drumthwacket, the governor's mansion in Princeton Township.
    "To hear the governor will already support the legislation is how we are going to get the job done," said Mr. Reeve.
    Mr. Reeve, a former Princeton Township resident best known for his Superman role, suffered a spinal-cord injury in a 1995 horseback riding accident that left him mostly paralyzed from the neck down.
    In September, Mr. Reeve was back in the news after one of his doctors announced the actor regained some movement and sensation in his hands and feet.
    The New Jersey legislation, proposed by Senate Co-President Richard Codey (D-West Orange), would declare em- bryonic stem-cell research permissible in the state. The measure also would set up procedures that would allow the donation of surplus embryos for medical research.
    Embryonic stem cells, which can evolve into any kind of cell in the body, show tremendous promise, according to medial researchers.
    While hospitalized shortly after his accident, Mr. Reeve pledged he would walk in time for his 50th birthday.
    The news conference preceded a reception sponsored by Sun National Bank to celebrate Mr. Reeve's 50th birthday Sept. 25. The proceeds will go to the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation.
    The Bush administration, the Catholic Church and anti-abortion groups oppose embryonic stem-cell research, maintaining potential human life is destroyed in the process. Last year, President Bush banned the use of federal funds for embryonic stem-cell research, but permitted researchers to continue to use existing stem-cell lines. Opponents of embryonic stem-cell research have supported using adult stems cells.
    Supporters of embryonic stem-cell research, like Mr. Reeve, contend that millions of people suffering from debilitating illnesses or injuries should not have a chance for recovery thwarted by a political debate.
    Dr. Wise Young, director of the W.M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers University in Piscataway, said Mr. Reeve's statement seven years ago truly motivated scientists to push for a cure.
    While embryonic stem-cell research is legal in New Jersey, the restrictions placed by the federal government have scared off potential investors in such re- search, Dr. Young said.
    Mr. Reeve moved to Princeton Township at age 3 and grew up on Campbelton Road. A Princeton Day School graduate, he began his acting career as a stage hand at McCarter Theatre.
    He also recalled his acting days with the PJ&B Players, named after the shuttle train from Princeton to the Princeton Junction train station.


    ├é┬ęPacket Online 2002




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  8. #8
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    go gov and chris!

    NJ and stem cells......Perfect Together!

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