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  • I did not get more functional recovery 3 or more years after injury.

    68 46.90%
  • I had a "complete" spinal cord injury at 24 hours and had no voluntary movement or sensation more than 2 segments below the injury site but recovered additional motor and/or sensory function 3 or more years after injury

    19 13.10%
  • I was an ASIA A at 24 hours and recovered additional function 3 or more years after injury

    29 20.00%
  • I was ASIA B at 24 hours and recovered additional function 3 or more years after injury

    22 15.17%
  • I was ASIA C at 24 hours and recovered additional function 3 or more years after injury

    7 4.83%
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Thread: Do people who were ASIA A, B, C at 24 hours after injury recover function 3 or more years after injury?

  1. #81

  2. #82
    I was ASIA A 24 hrs after injury and only 22 months later I now am ASIA C

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Cowgirl
    I was ASIA A 24 hrs after injury and only 22 months later I now am ASIA C
    Cowgirl, that is great. This poll is part of a series that asked people on the site how much they have recovered after injury. It was eye-opening. A majority of people in almost all the polls said that they had recovered more than the medical literature predicted that they would. For example, according to the model systems database, about 5% of people who were ASIA A recoverd to ASIA C. This is evidently not true based even on this poll which asked specifically about people who had recovered function more than 3 years after injury. Now, with the latest study from UCLA indicating that 90% or more of patients with ASIA C shortly after injury will recover independent locomotion within a year or two after injury, it has become clear that people with initially incomplete injuries have far greater capacity for recovery than previously realized.

    Wise.

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by irishcailin
    hi young wise

    my brother is C7-C7 in complete sensory maybe complete motor he was injured march 05 he has normal arm range and movement very good wrist movement but very poor hand and finger movement he has movement in his hips he is on a bowel program every other day while he has no problem in hospital when he comes home at weekends it does not work so well is there any hope of him he control of the bladder or bowel. we are still in the dark about sci just found this site today any information or advice will be greatly appreciated

    thank you
    marie
    Marie,

    I am sorry that I did not answer your question earlier. I am glad that cowgirl bumped up this topic so that I saw this.

    Your brother is still within his first year after injury. The classification of complete and incomplete is probably predictive only from the first week or so after injury. As you can see, a majority of people recover some function after injury, many from ASIA A (complete) to ASIA C (motor incomplete, not useful). Relatively few go from ASIA A to ASIA D (motor incomplete, useful).

    It is hard to predict how much function your brother will get but there are many people who are in the same boat and will need regenerative therapies. That is the main reason why we need to have clinical trials to test therapies that have been shown to restore some function in rats. In the meantime, he needs to continue to work hard at recovery, to get as much back as he can.

    In my opinion, the more that a person gets back, the more likely that a treatment will add to the function. I don't know if the following analogy makes any sense but let me try and perhaps your brother can understand. The spinal cord system is sort of like a battleship, with certain capabilities and many ways of doing collecting data and projecting offensive projectiles to targets. In other words, one should think of motor control and sensations almost like a weapons platform. The more weapons and ammunition you get, the more capable the system becomes. Treatments add more weapons and exercise/practice make use of the existing weapons and tools better.

    Wise.

  5. #85
    I don't know what ASIA level I was but at the time of my acident, 22 years ago, I was told that the injury (the physical break) was at T12 - L1. My spine had seperated and the lower L region had moved up inside the T region, streching the cord and cuting about 65% of it.

    For about a year after the accident I had no movement in my legs, normal sensation down to the hips, and deep sensation in my legs (I couldn't feel needles, feathers etc., but I could feel a hard nip or heavy pressure)

    About a year after the opperation, I was driving down the road one day lissening to the radio, unconsiously tapping my foot to the music when I looked down and saw my right leg moving. At that time I had regained use of the inner thigh and front muscles - stronger in the right leg. While lying on my back on the bed, I could close me legs but not open them and when lying on my side I could pull my knees up to my chest but not straighten them.

    A few years later, I guess it was more than 3 years post, I was lying on my bed thinking of moving my ancle so that my toes would move towards my head. I noticed, in my left leg, the muscle just above my kneecap was moving.

    Other than helping with my balance while sitting, I guess you would say that this recovery was not useful.
    Last edited by Vinnie; 03-06-2006 at 10:06 AM.

  6. #86
    My husband was diagnosed with C3/4 sublixation with near complete quadriplegia, was on a ventilator for 10 days. They did not classify him as Asia anything that I can find, but he had no sensation or movement 24 hours post injury. I had to insist that he be transferred to rehab hospital instead of a skilled nursing facility because his doctor said "there is nothing to rehab".

    I do remember when he was transferred to rehab 17 days post that they tested his anal sensation and he reported that he could feel it, I don't recall if he could move there.

    He is now 30 months post. We think he is now classified as Asia D. Is walking with a cane, however extremely limited endurance and speed. Has bowel movements on his own. Difficulty with his bladder, does not void completely, cannot achieve an erection. Can feed, dress and bathe himself and can drive without any specialized controls. His body does not regulate his temperature very well, he is often cold, and we live in southern california. He has moderate spasticity, so it makes it hard for them to score some of his muscles according to his PT. He had solumedrol within 2 hours of injury and has had pretty extensive PT till present. (fighting hard still with insurance to continue it), was and still is extremely motivated and hard working towards his recovery. He is 54 now. He was in very good condition when his injury occured having always been and active person, daily walk/run and lifted weights all his life.

    I continue to see changes and his PT indicates that he is still changing. We hope to make it all the way back, but we are fortunate we are doing as well as we are. We are encouraged that the magic 2 year mark does not seem applicable to incomplete injuries. There is a guy is PT that was shot and had no grip strength, he is 3-4 years post. All of a sudden in the last 2 months he went from 2 lbs to 45 lbs.

    Snowflakes, no two are alike.

  7. #87

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    ...Your brother is still within his first year after injury. The classification of complete and incomplete is probably predictive only from the first week or so after injury. As you can see, a majority of people recover some function after injury, many from ASIA A (complete) to ASIA C (motor incomplete, not useful). Relatively few go from ASIA A to ASIA D (motor incomplete, useful).
    ....
    Wise.
    Dear dr Young,
    I would like to participate in this pool too, but before I do so, I'd like to clarify the definitions. What is your definition of 'functional' ?
    My case is : I am oscillating between ASIA A and ASIA B. Strictly according to the definition I have just be rated ASIA A, although I had been rated ASIA B [with question mark] some years ago, by another hospital, because of 'some' possible sensitivity in the perineal area [but which was at that time also with a question mark].
    Anyway, I did not recover much in terms of sensation, although things are still changing but not clearly enough to rate it. But I did have, first after 1 month, then after 7 months, then after 2.5 years and even recentely, further to intensive rehab, after 4.5 years, some new muscles I can control below injury level. But all of them are at level 1 [some of them even at 0.5] and are not at all useful, eventhough, I like them and sherisch them a lot !
    Since those muscles are not 'useful' , should I report them as 'new functionalities' or not ? To me, although not useful, they are still the encouraging proof for all of us that things can still change a bit. So how to rate that ?
    thanks in advance. Kind regards. Corinne

  8. #88
    kittim, thanks so much for posting. I am so gald that he is now ASIA D. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by kittim
    My husband was diagnosed with C3/4 sublixation with near complete quadriplegia, was on a ventilator for 10 days. They did not classify him as Asia anything that I can find, but he had no sensation or movement 24 hours post injury. I had to insist that he be transferred to rehab hospital instead of a skilled nursing facility because his doctor said "there is nothing to rehab".

    I do remember when he was transferred to rehab 17 days post that they tested his anal sensation and he reported that he could feel it, I don't recall if he could move there.

    He is now 30 months post. We think he is now classified as Asia D. Is walking with a cane, however extremely limited endurance and speed. Has bowel movements on his own. Difficulty with his bladder, does not void completely, cannot achieve an erection. Can feed, dress and bathe himself and can drive without any specialized controls. His body does not regulate his temperature very well, he is often cold, and we live in southern california. He has moderate spasticity, so it makes it hard for them to score some of his muscles according to his PT. He had solumedrol within 2 hours of injury and has had pretty extensive PT till present. (fighting hard still with insurance to continue it), was and still is extremely motivated and hard working towards his recovery. He is 54 now. He was in very good condition when his injury occured having always been and active person, daily walk/run and lifted weights all his life.

    I continue to see changes and his PT indicates that he is still changing. We hope to make it all the way back, but we are fortunate we are doing as well as we are. We are encouraged that the magic 2 year mark does not seem applicable to incomplete injuries. There is a guy is PT that was shot and had no grip strength, he is 3-4 years post. All of a sudden in the last 2 months he went from 2 lbs to 45 lbs.

    Snowflakes, no two are alike.

  9. #89
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDK513
    My husband was injured December 23, 1999. We were told his injury was complete at T4, his ASIA was A. Two days later he could feel the pinprick on his big toe, but that was all. As of 14 months ago his level had dropped to T7, ASIA B-. Yesterday his Doctor was shocked, not having seen him during the past 14 months to find his level is now T10, ASIA D. His doctor was very encouraged and believes his swimming 2-3 miles a week, nautilaus training and PT has contributed to this improvement. He wants him to step it up even more and walk as much as possible. I was wondering if the program Bruce participated in would be viable for my husband. We are very excited at his continued improvement.
    This is excellent. This gives me a lot of faith. I am a T6 complete 4 months post. I swim 2-3 times a week. I stretch with my trainer 2x a week and I am tryen to stand & glide at least 2 hours a day. KDK you give me much hope. I wish your husband the best of luck in a full recovery. Thank-you for posting.
    Last edited by spidergirl; 03-05-2006 at 11:16 PM.

  10. #90
    To be quite honest I don't think anyone knows how much you will recover and how long it will take. I met a man at Home Depot who was 60 when he was injured as a C4/C5 complete. 7 years later he got all of his function back. Same thing happened to a Sheriff I visited. He was paralyzed for two years and with extensive therapy he also regained all function. He didn't tell me his level just that he was told he would never walk again. I`would love to find a way to get all SCI's that did recover completely to let us know.

    Deb
    "Save the last dance for me!"

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