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  1. #1
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    question

    what do you think would happen if I went to a place like medra or beike and specifically asked them to use "hla matched " blood cells to me? Instead of just a shot in the dark? I am sure that they have the resources to do that one little difference?
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  2. #2
    Senior Member 0xSquidy's Avatar
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    They could do whatever the hell they wanted, but they are not in the curing business, they are in the "get rich off desperate people" business. Just deal with it.
    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials.

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  3. #3
    But how they administer the cells also makes a difference.
    They also don't know how many cells to inject. It would
    still be a shot in the dark, unfortunately.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Buck_Nastier View Post
    But how they administer the cells also makes a difference.
    Exactly, it appears that opening the dura is required if the cells are to reach the intended target (injury site)

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    what do you think would happen if I went to a place like medra or beike and specifically asked them to use "hla matched " blood cells to me? Instead of just a shot in the dark? I am sure that they have the resources to do that one little difference?
    lunasicc,

    Nether Medra nor Beike provide HLA-matched cord blood units.

    It is not "one little difference". In order to find a matching cord blood unit, one has to choose from 20,000-30,000 units. Public banks such as New York Blood Bank and Stemcyte spend many years collecting cord blood units that are donated by people for public use. The cost of collecting and storing these units are very high. The prices for such units are set by the National Marrow Donor Program. The current price is close to $30,000 per unit.

    Places like Beike and Medra would not spend the money to buy such HLA-matched units. More important, they wouldn't know how to give the cells. These places know little about spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

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