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Thread: Say good-bye to spinal scars, thanks to newly found blood cells

  1. #1

    Say good-bye to spinal scars, thanks to newly found blood cells

    this is great!

    Say good-bye to spinal scars, thanks to newly found blood cells

    Scientists have identified a group of blood vessel cells that might be helpful to repair scars on the spinal cord.

    The team of scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas in Spain are behind the discovery, which is expected to enhance our understanding on how scars are formed in nervous tissue.

    It may shed light on scar formation throughout the body and diseases like fibrosis as well.

    “Scientists have been studying scar formation for over a century”, ABC Science quoted Dr Christian Goritz, who led the research, as saying.




    read...

    http://news.bioscholar.com/2011/07/s...ood-cells.html

  2. #2
    "......Under the microscope, a scar in the spinal cord shows two cell types. There is a core of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts. Outside the core is a layer of cells, called astrocytes."

    I have been wondering for a few years now how is it possible that scientists can't put the scar tissue under a microscope, look at it together & finally agree on what they are seeing.
    It is just me or there is something wrong with researchers?

    Wise please comment if you have time.

    Paolo
    In God we trust; all others bring data. - Edwards Deming

  3. #3
    I really hate the title from bioscholar: (say goodbye to spinal scars)...we need further investigation into whether the modulation of pericytes after CNS injury can stimulate functional recovery. (Not waving goodbye yet!)


    Unexpected Cell Repairs the Injured Spinal Cord

    ScienceDaily (July 7, 2011) — A study from Karolinska Institutet has revealed how scar tissue is formed after damage to the central nervous system. For more than a century, scientists thought that glial cells were responsible for scar formation; now, however, a paper published in Science shows that spinal cord scar tissue largely derives from a completely unexpected type of cell called a pericyte, opening new opportunities for the treatment of damaged nerve tissue.

    Lesions to the brain or spinal cord rarely heal fully, which leads to permanent functional impairment. After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), neurons are lost and largely replaced by a scar often referred to as the glial scar based on its abundance of supporting glial cells. Although this process has been known to science for over a century, the function of the scar tissue has long been disputed. However, there are indications that it stabilizes the tissue and that it inhibits the re-growth of damaged nerve fibres.

    In this present study, Professor Jonas Frisén and his team of researchers show that the majority of scar cells in the damaged spinal cord are not glial cells at all, but derive from pericytes, a small group of cells located along blood vessels. They reveal that these pericytes start to divide after an injury, giving rise to a mass of connective tissue cells that migrate towards the lesion to form a large portion of the scar tissue. Their paper also shows that these cells are needed to regain the tissue integrity, and that in the absence of this reaction, holes appear in the tissue instead of scarring.

    For many years, scientists have tried to modulate scar formation after CNS damage in order to facilitate functional recovery, and have concentrated on glial cells. However, these new findings indicate a critical and previously unknown mechanism for scar formation following damage to the nerve system, and give reason for further investigation into whether the modulation of pericytes after CNS injury can stimulate functional recovery.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0707141155.htm
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 07-12-2011 at 03:25 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    Wonder how this affects Davies' work?
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

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  5. #5
    Well, Decorin dissolves the scar and controls...but I doubt direct competition until they are able to actually control (modulation) of pericytes. (And probably prove which would be more satisfactory.) That's a very good question at this point. I'll be watching this as additional research work is actually done in this area. (that's why I hate the waving goodbye stuff since the work hasn't been completed). Very important work though!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Their paper also shows that these cells are needed to regain the tissue integrity, and that in the absence of this reaction, holes appear in the tissue instead of scarring. If they eliminate the pericytes, then holes appear...so you can see where a lot of work will need to be done.
    Last edited by GRAMMY; 07-12-2011 at 03:54 AM.

  6. #6
    Has anyone got a copy of the paper for this work?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Fly_Pelican_Fly View Post
    Has anyone got a copy of the paper for this work?
    Harvey, I don't have the paper on this one. I can only find this additional information here.


    http://www.abc.net.au/science/articl...08/3264927.htm

  8. #8
    Senior Member 0xSquidy's Avatar
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    I found it but I can't pull it out from my laptop, I have the university credentials in my computer, will be there in a few hours. If anyone else will be faster it's here http://www.sciencemag.org/content/333/6039/238.full
    Don't ask what clinical trials can do for you, ask what you can do for clinical trials.

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  9. #9
    Thanks guys. I managed to get a copy. Interesting paper. Will post in the "scar tissue" sticky thread.

  10. #10
    This is a beautiful paper and makes a strong argument that we have been neglecting the role of pericytes in spinal cord injury. Pericytes are very interesting cells that share several markers with oligodendroglial cells and are believed to be stem cells that organize endothelial cells to form blood vessels. In studies that my colleague Yi Ren has done at the W. M. Keck Center, it is clear that pericytes are essential for blood vessel formation in teratomas and that if she blocked macrophages that secrete a factor called MIF (migration inhibition factor) to reduce pericyte recruitment, teratomas do not form when embryonic stem cells are injected into the spinal cord.

    I am fascinated by the fact that pericytes apparently express NG2, the same marker as oligodendroglial precursor cells. The two cells may be related and perhaps even serve similar functions. Both are amazing cells. Pericytes are like traffic cops, directing herds of endothelial and other cells to organize into blood vessels. Pericytes seem to know when they are needed and where to go. By the way, I have long wondered how the arterial end of a capillary knows where to find the venous end to make a blood vessel. The pericyte probably can do it with its eyes closed (or without eyes).

    Oligodendroglial precursor cells seem to know where demyelination has occurred, migrate to these places, and make oligodendroglial cells that extend as many as 21 processes to wrap around axons to make myelin. By the way, myelin is constantly breaking down and reform in the spinal cord and thus oligodendroglial precursors are very busy all the time. Likewise, blood vessels are constantly being formed and degraded in response to activity, injury, and aging.

    By the way, I am still skeptical about the role of "glial scars" in spinal cord injury. This group, like many others, did sharp cuts of the spinal cord. This is not a typical kind of spinal cord injury that occurs with blunt trauma. So, I don't know how much this work is relevant to spinal cord injury. However, it does point out a much neglected cell in the spinal cord and there is a need for scientists to study the role of pericytes in contused spinal cords.

    Wise.

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