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Thread: Who misses their old job?

  1. #21
    Senior Member sorefm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefly_Aviator View Post
    Tomorrow I'm turning in my official retirement as a firefighter. I've been a fireman since I was 17 years old. It's all I've ever known and it's a part of my identity. Now I have to let it go. I fought for over a year to get strong enough to go back.. but its just not going to happen. I'm walking much better, but stairs are really tough. I showed them a video of me carrying a 50 pound weighted pack and doing stairs and they were really proud of me. But the part of the video i didn't show, was that I could only do one flight of stairs without really struggling. Some days I can't climb stairs at all. Pretty important stuff to be a fireman. I love this job too much to try and fake and go back to work. I'm afraid I would injure someone or couldnt help them if they needed me. I just wish they could have put me in the training department or something. I'm reallllllly going to miss the whole lifestyle. :-(
    You are only 1 year post injury. YOU have a lot of recovery still coming your way. I'm an L1 burst (fractured t6 and t12 just for good measure...), I'm also walking unassisted and I know the B&B blues also. Things are so much better now than the were at the 1 year point (I'm 28 months post injury), including B&B issues. Hang in there and keep working hard, you may not be rescuing people out of burning buildings anymore but things are still going to get better.

    Fred

  2. #22
    I was a chemist in a hospital lab. I really miss the work and especially the people.

  3. #23
    I was to start a new job 2 days after my injury. I was going to travel the world, manage a sales force both in China and Vietnam. It was my dream job.

    They held it for me for 4 weeks and kept sending me flowers but I ended up letting them know this was going to take a while and they needed to find someone else for the role.

    I don't think much about it because I am focused on getting myself to walk.

    The good news is they did tell me to contact them when I am ready to work.

  4. #24
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    i miss everything about my job i managed apts. so i was always running here and there. i lived there as well so i knew everyone it was a great time in my life.

  5. #25
    Miss it like hell!

    If I only had hands. I couldn't do everything I did but I could still be a Vet Tech...give vaccines, draw blood, scruff & hold for procedures, x-ray, run labs, set IV's, prep for surgery, anesthesia...blah, blah,blah.

    I love life but it would have more meaning if I could just do what I was created to do.

  6. #26
    I do I miss professional painting , cool stuff....

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by tooley View Post
    hell yes. I worked as a tech at a busy Dodge dealership with an awesome group of people. I was flat rate, meaning I got paid the labour rate no matter how quick I got a job done. Routinely clocked 12-15 hours in a 8 hour shift at $35 an hour. Damn rights I am proud of that, my record day was over 25 hours. If I never crashed my MX bike and broke my neck I would have made $100k that year. All by turning wrenches. I look at my huge Snap-On toolbox and just bawl, I wish I never ever saw a dirtbike.
    That's funny, I was a technician at a Ford dealership with a pretty good group of people. I was one of the two guys that did interior trim, electronics and air-conditioning but I was trained bumper-to-bumper on scholarship through Ford. In high school I was in the competition sponsored by Ford where we diagnosed and repaired a Ford Taurus. At the time my autos instructor knew the parts and service director at a very busy Ford dealership. The program started every two years and it was the middle of two years when I graduated high school. I started working at the dealership the day after I turned 18 and worked for a year before I even started going to school. The school was at the community college where I did eight weeks in school and eight weeks in the dealership. It worked out great. I was 22 when I got hurt, not making $35 a flat rate hour, but it was 2000 and it was really rare that I flagged less than 15 hours a day, especially in the summertime in Arizona. I miss the hell out of it. It was a blast, and the money was great. I still give people advice on their cars all the time and walk people through fixing them the best I can. Now they want me to get into mechanical engineering because of my mechanical abilities and I'm pretty good with math I just have to keep myself healthy enough to get through it. I wish I didn't have seizures so I could drive myself to school.
    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Zaphod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rybread View Post
    That's funny, I was a technician at a Ford dealership with a pretty good group of people. I was one of the two guys that did interior trim, electronics and air-conditioning but I was trained bumper-to-bumper on scholarship through Ford. In high school I was in the competition sponsored by Ford where we diagnosed and repaired a Ford Taurus. At the time my autos instructor knew the parts and service director at a very busy Ford dealership. The program started every two years and it was the middle of two years when I graduated high school. I started working at the dealership the day after I turned 18 and worked for a year before I even started going to school. The school was at the community college where I did eight weeks in school and eight weeks in the dealership. It worked out great. I was 22 when I got hurt, not making $35 a flat rate hour, but it was 2000 and it was really rare that I flagged less than 15 hours a day, especially in the summertime in Arizona. I miss the hell out of it. It was a blast, and the money was great. I still give people advice on their cars all the time and walk people through fixing them the best I can. Now they want me to get into mechanical engineering because of my mechanical abilities and I'm pretty good with math I just have to keep myself healthy enough to get through it. I wish I didn't have seizures so I could drive myself to school.
    I'll give you the same advice that another engineer gave me before I stubbornly started my eng degree anyway..... don't. If you're good at math and wanna make some good coin I think certified accountant would be a lot easier degree to get through and a lot surer route to high dollars. First year eng. demanded every second of my attention every day for 8 months and if I was starting again today, I wouldn't do it again.

    If you're like me, and not going to listen, make sure you do the career research and pick a dicipline that will work well for you. It's easy (depending on where you live) to work your a** off for four years and come out with an earning potential lower than the tradesmen you'll supervise I think (this was my engineer friends complaint to me, he was a civil engineer).

    I chose a feild that pays very well (mining) but I know I'm going to have issues finding work initially, junior mining engineers usually spend a fair bit of their time in the mine, surveying, taking samples, whatever. It will be hard to convince an employer to hire me for a midlevel position straight out of school, good thing I'm so charming and attractive! :P

  9. #29
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    I had never been employed pre-injury - I was 18 when I was injured, and had just started college, going for Political Science. I ended up following through on that, but ended up in a completely left-field career by accident and pure dumb luck.

    I'm happy with my job, but it is very demanding of me, both physically and mentally. I have to travel often, which is a hassle in and of itself, but I have the routine down to a science. I put in long hours, make conference calls to Europe and Asia at odd hours for me. I need to stay abreast of 20 situations that need active guidance, management, and decision making. C'est la vie. I need three of me!

  10. #30
    Senior Member TheAbleChef's Avatar
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    I was a chef...I guess many of you know that. But i miss it so much. I've been told to go back and try but it's impossible to cook fine dining cuisine in a wheelchair. I still about the old days when working 12-14 a day was fun.
    Never Give Up!

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